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BULLETIN 

The University of Georgia 



Volume LI I, No. 10 



May, 1952 



General Catalogue 




Register for 1951-1952 
Announcements for 1952-1953 



Athens, Georgia 



\ 



?3? 



BULLETIN 



The University of Georgia 




OnWo. U^^gtJr 



GENERAL CATALOGUE 
1952-1953 



ATHENS, GEORGIA 



1952 








CALENDAR 










1952 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 






1 


2| 3 


4 


5 






1 


2| 3 


4 


5 








1| 2 


3 


4 


6 


7 


8 


9|10 


11 


12 


6 


7 


8 


9|10 


11 


12 


5 


6 


7 


8| 9 


10 


11 


13 


14 


15 


16|17 


18 


19 


13 


14 


15 


16|17 


18 


19 


12 


13 


14 


15|16 


17 


18 


20 


21 


22 


23|24 


25 


26 


20 


21 


22 


23)24 


25 


26 


19 


20 


21 


22|23 


24 


25 


2,7 


28 


29 


301 






27 


28 


29 


30|31 


- 


,___ 


26 


27 


28 


29|30 


31 














MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




5 


6 


— 1 1 

7| 8 


2 
9 


3 

10 












1 
8 


2 
9 


~2 


3 


4 


— 
5 


- 

6 


7 


1 


4 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


11 


12 


13 


14|15 


16 


17 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


18 


19 


20 


21J22 


23 


24 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


25 


26 


27 


28129 


30 


31 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




31 














30 






































JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


2| 3 


4| 5 


6 


7 




1 


2 


3| 4 


5 


6 




1 


2 


3| 4| 5 


6 


8 


9110 


11|12 


13 


14 


7 


8 


9 


10|11 


12 


13 


7 


8 


9 


10|11|12 


13 


15 


16|17 


18|19 


20 


21 


14 


15 


16 


|17|18 


19 


20 


14 


15 


16 


17|18|19 


20 


2 2 


23|24 


25 |26 


27 


28 


21 


22 


23 


24(25 


26 


27 


21 


22 


23 


24|25|26 


27 


29 


30i 


— 1— 






28 


29 


30 


| 






28 


29 


30 


31 


_ _. 





















1953 








C 


:a 


LE 


END 


A! 


* 










1953 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




5 


6 


-1 1 

7| 8 


2 
9 


3 

10 


5 


— 1— 

6| 7 


1| 2| 3| 4 
8| 9|10|11 








1| 2 
8| 9 


3 

10 


4 


4 


5 


6 


7 


11 


11 


12 


13 


14|15 


16 


17 


12 


13|14 


15|16|17|18 


12 


13 


14 


15|16 


17 


18 


18 


19 


20 


21|22 


23 


24 


19 


20|21 


22|23|24|25 


19 


20 


21 


22)23 


24 


25 


25 


26 


27 


28|29 


30 


31 


26 


27128 


29|30j 


26 


27 


28 


29|30 


31 




FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4| 5 
11 112 


6 
13 


7 
14 










1 

8 


2 

9 








__| 




I 


8 


3 


4 


5 


6| 7 


2 


3 


4 


5| 6 


7 


15 


16 


17 


18|19 


20 


21 


10 


11 


12 


13|14 


15 


16 


9 


10 


11 


12)13 


14)15 


22 


93 


24 


25126 


27 


28 


17 


18 


19 


20|21 


22 


23 


16 


17 


18 


19)20 


21J22 




24 


25 


26 


27|28 


29 


30 


23 


24 


25 


26|27 


28|29 




31 






I 






30 


31 




1 


L_ 




















MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


2| 3 


41 51 61 7 




11 2| 3| 4 


5| 6 






1| 2 


3| 4 


5 


8 


9|10 


11|12|13|14 


7 


8| 9 10)11 


12)13 


6 


7 


8| 9 


10)11 


12 


15 


16|17 


18|19|20|21 


14 


15|16|17|18 


19 [20 


13 


14 


15116 


17)18 


19 


22 


23|24 


25|26|27|28 


21 


22|23|24|25 


26|27 


20 


21 


22123 


24|25 


26 


29 


30|31 


1 1-1 - 


2 8 


29)30) ___. 


-1- 


27 


28 


29)30 


I-- 





June 10-11: 
June 12: 
July 4: 
July 25: 



July 28: 
August 21: 
August 22: 



September 21-27 
September 22: 

September 23: 

September 24: 
September 25-27 

September 29: 
October 11: 
November 27-29 
December 12: 
December 13-18 
December 19: 



January 5: 
January 6: 
February 26: 

March 13: 
March 14-19: 
March 20-23: 



CALENDAR, 1952-1953 

SUMMER QUARTER, 19 52 

First Term 

Registration 
Classes begin 
Legal Holiday- 
Term ends 

Second Term 

Registration and classes begin 

Term ends 

Graduation 

FALL QUARTER, 1952 

Freshman week 

Freshmen get attendance card in lobby of Fine Arts Audi 

torium 9-9:45 a. m. 
Freshmen get registration envelopes 2 to 5 p. m. Assem 

bly at 7 p. m. 
Registration envelopes for all students 
Registration — Freshmen 2 to 4 p. m. on 

classes 8:30 a. m. on the 26th to 10 a 
Classes begin for all students 
Saturday class registration 
Thanksgiving recess and Homecoming 
Classes end 
Examinations 
Christmas vacation begins 

WINTER QUARTER, 19 53 

Registration 
Classes begin 
Constitution examination- 
Academic Building 
Classes end 
Examinations 
Spring recess 



the 25th. Other 
m. on the 27th. 



:30 p. m. Room 212 



March 24: 
March 25: 
May: 

June 2: 
June 7: 
June 3-8: 
June 9: 



June 15-16: 
June 17: 
August 21: 



SPRING QUARTER, 1953 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Annual inspection for Air and Army ROTC and also 

Honors Day held during May. 
Classes end 
Baccalaureate Sermon 
Examinations 
Graduation 

SUMMER QUARTER, 19 5 3 

Registration 
Classes begin 
Graduation 



Entered at the Post Office at Athens, Georgia, as Second Class Matter, May 27, 1946, 

under Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. Issued 33 times each year, once in 

September, twice in October, six times in January, four times in February, six times 

in March, twice in April, six times in May, five times in June and once in August. 



Serial No. 1053 
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CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar, 1952-1953 r 3 

Map of Campus 4 

Board of Regents 8 

Administrative Officers 

General 9 

Educational 10 

Faculty 11 

Library Staff 41 

Graduate Assistants 41 

General Information 

History 43 

Atlanta Division 44 

Grounds and Buildings 44 

Libraries 45 

Laboratories 46 

Admission to Colleges and Schools 

By Certificate 4 7 

By Examination 49 

As Special Students 49 

As Irregular Students 50 

With Advanced Standing 50 

Exemptions for Transfer Students 51 

Graduate and Professional Schools 51 

Registration 51 

Freshman Registration 52 

Fields of Instructional Work 

Degrees Offered 52 

Armed Services 53 

Programs for Veterans 56 

Academic Regulations 

Units of Credit 57 

Grading System 57 

Classification of Students 58 

Work Load 58 

Requirements for Degrees 59 

Miscellaneous Regulations 61 

Probation and Dismissal 62 

Honors and Prizes 64 

Student Life and Activities 

Student Counseling 70 

Student Health Service 71 

[6 ] 



CONTENTS 

Page 
Housing of Students 

University Residence and Dining Halls 74 

Fees and Expenses 

Fees Payable on Registration 77 

Time and Method of Payment 79 

Special Fees and Charges 79 

Fee Refunds 80 

Summary of Expenses 80 

Financial Aid for Students 

Loan Funds 81 

Student Employment 85 

Placement of Graduates _ 85 

Division of General Extension 86 

Other University Activities 

Short Courses, Conferences, Institutes 88 

The University of Georgia Press 89 

Athletic Association 89 

Alumni Society ! 90 

The University Foundation 90 

M. G. Michael Award for Research 91 

Arthur Lucas Memorial Fund 91 

The Graduate School 92 

Master's Degrees 93 

Doctor of Philosophy 99 

Doctor of Education 101 

Fellowships, Assistantships, and Scholarships 102 

Research Program at the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies 103 

The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences 105 

The School of Law 184 

The School of Pharmacy 201 

The College of Agriculture 213 

The George Foster Peabody School of Forestry 271 

The Peabody College of Education ... 281 

The College of Business Administration 317 

The Henry W. Grady School of Journalism 342 

The School of Home Economics 357 

The School of Veterinary Medicine 376 

Degrees Conferred 388 

Index 406 

[ 7] 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA 

20 Ivy Street, S. E. ; Atlanta 

January 18, 1950-January 1 



Mrs. William T. Healey, Atlanta 
State-at-Large 

John J. McDonough, Atlanta 
State-at-Large 

Frank M. Spratlin, Atlanta 
State-at-Large 

Frank D. Foley, Columbus 
State-at-Large 

Carey Williams, Greensboro 
State-at-Large 

James Peterson, Soperton 
First Congressional District 

H. L. Wingate, Pelham 

Second Congressional District 

Cason J. Callaway, Hamilton 
Third Congressional District 

Robert 0. Arnold, Covington 
Fourth Congressional District 

Rutherford L. Ellis, Atlanta 
Fifth Congressional District 

Charles J. Bloch, Macon 
Sixth Congressional District 

C L. Moss, Calhoun 

Seventh Congressional District 

Francis Stubbs, Sr., Douglas 
Eighth Congressional District 

Edgar B. Dunlap. Sr., Gainesville 
Ninth Congressional District 

Roy V. Harris, Augusta 

Tenth Congressional District 



January 1, 1950-January 1 
January 1, 1946-January 1 
January 8, 1952-January 1 
January 10, 1949-January 1 
January 10, 1949-January 1 
January 1, 1947-January 1 
January 1, 1951- January 1 
January 10, 1949-January 1 
January 1, 1947-January 1 
January 7, 1950-January 1 
January 1, 1952-January 1 
January 12, 1950-January 1 
January 3, 1952-January 1 
January 1, 1951-January 1 



"On leave. 



OFFICERS OF THE REGENTS 

Robert O. Arnold, Chairman 
John J. McDonough, Vice Chairman 
Harmon W. Caldwell, Chancellor 
Henry K. Stanford, Assistant Chancellor 
*John E. Sims, Assistant to the Chancellor 
L. R. Siebert, Executive Secretary 
James A. Blissit, Treasurer 



[ 8] 



1953 
1957 
1953 
1956 
195F 
1955 
1954 
1958 
1956 
1954 
1957 
1959 
1957 
1959 
1958 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

GENERAL 

PRESIDENT 

Omer Clyde Aderhold, President 

Jonathan Clark Rogers, President Emeritus 

Joseph Anderson Williams, Assistant to the President 

Sybil Thomas Welden, Secretary to the President 

DEAN OF FACULTIES 

Alvin Blocksom Biscoe, Dean 

Albert Bruce Jones, Assistant to the Dean 

Carolyn Mosteller, Secretary to the Dean 

John Olin Eidson, Director of the Coordinate Campus 

Robert Travis Osborne. Director of the Veterans Guidance Center 

DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 
Joseph Thomas Askew, Dean 
William Tate, Dean of Men 
Edith Langdale Stallings. Dean of Women 
Walter Newman Danner, Jr.. Director of Admissions 
John Lee Cox, Jr., Director of Men's Activities 
*John David Storey, Director of Men's Housing 
Weste Harris Patton, Acting Director of Men's Hov 
Julia Nelle Tumlin, Director of Women's Activities and Housivg 
Dolores Elizabeth Artau, Administrative Counselor 
Birdie Bondurant, Counselor for Coordinate Campus 
Ralph Eriiart Wenzel, M.D., University Physician 
John Hanson Thomas McPherson. Jr., University Surgeon 
Lee Anne Seawell, Director of Placement and Student Aid 
Janie Goolsby Poodry, Director of the Student Union 
Claude Davidson, Jr., Consultant to Student Publications 
Robert Hyman Ayers, University Chaplain 
William Robert Moyle, Assistant University Chaplain 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

William Porter Kellam, Director 

Evelyn Mae Fritz, Associate Director 

Duncan Bl*rnet, Librarian Emeritus, General Library 

COMPTROLLER 

John Dixon Bolton, Comptroller and Treasurer 

Benjamin Clark Kinney, Head of the Department of Plant Operations 

Madge Mildred Lesher, Assistant Treasurer 

Harry Hilliard Thompson, Jr., Assistant Treasurer 

Jenkins Comer Whitehead, Director of the Bureau of Statistics 

REGISTRAR 

Walter Newman Danner, Jr.. Registrar 
Belle Newton Doolittle, Assistant Registrar 



•On leave. 

[ 9] 



Eugene Francis Tragesser, Assistant Registrar 

Agnes Fike Storey, Assistant Registrar 

Jenkins Comer Whitehead, Director of the Bureau of Statistics 

DIVISION OF GENERAL EXTENSION 

Ernest Algernon Lowe, Director 
William Richard Alexander, Assistant Director 
Willis Frank Dobbs, Pharmaceutical Extension Specialist 
Elizabeth Powell, Administrative Assistant and Supervisor, Correspond- 
ence Study and Extension Class Organization. 
James Eugene Welden, Coordinator of Special Services 
Marion Lampkin West, Assistant Coordinator of Special Services 

ATLANTA DIVISION 

George McIntosh Sparks, Director 
Thomas Wilkinson Mahler, Administrative Dean 
J. C. Horton Burch, Acting Dean of General Studies 
George Emanuel Manners, Resident Dean of Business Administration 
James Casper Camp, Dean of Men 
V. V. Lavroff, Comptroller 

John D. Blair, Director of Admissions and Acting Registrar 
♦Ernest Henry Emory, Registrar 

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMED SERVICES 

Wilkle C. Burt, Colonel of Armor, V. S. A., P.M.S.&T. 
Llewelyn Goode Duggar, Colonel U.S.A.F., P.A.S.&T. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Dyar Edwin Massey. Jr.. Director 

Claude Davidson, Jr., Director of the News Bureau 

UNIVERSITY PRESS 

Ralph Haygood Stephens, Director 

GEORGIA ALUMNI SOCIETY 

William Moore Crane, Jr., Alumni Secretary 
Jewell South. Alumnae Secretary 

DIRECTOR OF CONFERENCES, SOCIAL AND PUBLIC FUNCTIONS IN 
THE SUMMER SCHOOL 
Joseph Anderson Williams 

EDUCATIONAL 

GRADUATE SCHOOL— George Hugh Boyd, Dean 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES — Sidney Walter Martin, Dean 

SCHOOL OF LAW — John Alton Hosch, Dean 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY — Kenneth Lee Waters, Dean 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE — Calvin Clyde Murray, Dean 

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY — Donald James Weddell. Dean 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION— John Andrew Dotson, Dean 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION— James Edward Gates. Dean 

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM — John Eldridge Drewry, Dean 

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS — Pauline Park Wilson Knapp, Dean 

SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE— Thomas John Jones, Dean 



*On leave. 

[10] 



FACULTY 

Iba Edward Aabon, A.B.J. , M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education and 
Research Assistant, Bureau of Educational Studies and Field Services. 

Vibgil Emerson Adams, B.S., Assistant Editor, Agricultural Extension. 

William Eugenius Adams, B.S., M.S.A., Associate Agronomist, Research Divi- 
sion, Soil Conservation Service, U.S.D.A. 

Jules Cesar Alciatore, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of French. 

Emory DeWitt Alexander, B.S.A., M.S.A., Agronomist, Agricultural Exten- 
sion. 

James Wagner Alexander, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Classics 
and Head of the Department of Classics. 

Leland Rogers Alexander, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Associate Professor of Insti- 
tution Management. 

Lorenzo Eugene Allgood, B.S., M.Ed., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in the Demonstration School. 

♦John Fletcher Allums, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political 
Science. 

Eulala L. Amos, B.S.Ed., M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Frances Leonora Anderson, B.S.H.E., District Agent. Agricultural Exten- 
sion. 

•John Hilmer Anderson. B.M., M.M., Assistant Professor of Music. 

Robert Floyd Anderson, B.S., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Experiment, 
Georgia. 

James Whitmore Andrews, B.A., M.F.A., Temporary Assistant Professor of 
Drama. 

John Scott Andrews, B.S., M.S., Sc.D., Parasitologist, Tifton, Georgia, 
U.S.D.A. 

Mary Jane Appleby, A.B., Instructor in English. 

Emoby Dugas Appling, B.S.A., Soil Technician, Soil Testing Service. 

Ada Elizabeth Abmstbong, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Assistant Professor of Cloth- 
ing and Textiles. 

Alida Stevenson Abmstbong, B.S.H.E., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in the Demonstration School. 

Joseph Thomas Askew, Ph.B., M.A., LL.D., Associate Professor of Political 
Science and Dean of Student Affairs. 

Robebt Hyman Ayebs, A.B., B.D., Assistant Professor of Religion, Acting Head 
of the Department of Religion, and University Chaplain. 



•On leave. 

[ 11 ] 



12 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

John Edward Bailey, B.S.A., Associate Horticulturist and Superintendent of 
the Mountain Experiment Station, Blairsville, Georgia. 

Louise Green Bailey. B.S.H.E., Instructor in Education and Ci'itic Teacher 
in Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

Ralph Swinton Bailey, Agricultural Aid, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Wallace Kincaid Bailey, B.S., M.S., Horticulturist, Experiment, Georgia, 
U.S.D.A. 

*** Wesley Bailey, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Derwood McVey Baird. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Animal Husbandman, 
Experiment, Georgia. 

Wilfred Wickes Ballard, Agronomist, Experiment, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Leighton Milton Ballew, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Drama and Head 
of the Department of Speech and Drama. 

James Ammerman Barnes, B.Ed., Ph.M., Assistant Professor of Geography 
and Geology. 

Aurelius Pharr Barnett, B.S.A.E., Research Associate in Agricultural Engi- 
neering and Agricultural Engineer, Soil Conservation Service, U.S.D.A. 

Thomas Albert Barr, Jr., B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

David Francis Barrow, A.B., B.S.C.E., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Earl Edward Beach. B.S.M., M.A., Associate Professor of Music. 

Alice Beall, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Associate Professor of Education in Home 
Economics. 

Charles Allen Beaumont, A.B., Instructor in English. 

Edwin Gottlieb Beck, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

*Theodore Toulon Beck, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of Modern Foreign 
Languages. 

Clifford Myron Beckham, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Entomologist. Head of the De- 
partment of Entomology, and Chairman of the Division of Entomology, 
Experiment, Georgia. 

Wightman Samuel Beckwith, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

Charles Elwood Bell, Jr., B.S.A., Associate Animal Husbandman, Agricul- 
tural Extension. 

Ida Lou Bell, B.S.H.E., District Agent, Agricultural Extension. 

Marion Steele Bell, B.S., Major, Infantry, Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 

♦♦Frederick William Bennett, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Dairy. 



♦On leave. 

**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 
♦♦•Died April 14, 19r>i. 



THE FACULTY 13 



Herbert William Bennett, B.S.A., Associate Poultryman, Agricultural Ex- 
tension. 

Elwin Everett Bennington, B.S., Ph.D., Temporary Assistant Professor of 
Biology. 

Charles Benson, B.A., Temporary Instructor in Physics. 

Philip Edward Berk. B.S., B.J., M.A.. Temporary Assistant Professor of 
Journalism. 

Joe Marion Beutell, Jr.. B.B.A., First Lieutenant, USAF. Assistant Professor 
of Air Science and Tactics. 

Margaret Alice Bicklev. B.S.H.E.. Instructor in Child Development. 

Harrison Agnew Birchmore, A.B., M.A., LL.B., Part-time Instructor in Law. 

Alvin Blocksom Biscoe, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Dean 
of Faculties. 

George Norman Bishop, B.S.F., M.S.F., Professor of Forest Protection. 

♦Homer Augustus Black, B.B.A., M.B.A., C.P.A.. Associate Professor of Ac- 
counting. 

William Edward Black, B.S., Captain, USAF, Assistant Professor of Air 
Science and Tactics. 

Margaret Harris Blair. B.S.H.E., MA., Professor of Clothing and Textiles. 
Acting Head of the Department of Clothing and Textiles, and Chairman 
of the Division of Clothing and Textiles. 

Edwin Kingsley Blanchard, B.M., M.M., Assistant Professor of Music. 

Ernestine Bledsoe, A.B., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education. 

♦Joseph Cullie Bledsoe, A.B.Ed.. M.S.Ed.. Assistant Professor of Education 
and Research Assistant, Bureau of Educational Studies and Field Ser- 
vices. 

James Warner Boddie, B.S.For., Major, USAF, Assistant Professor of Air 
Science and Tactics. 

♦John Wyatt Bonner. Jr.. B.S.Ed., A.B. in L.S.. Assistant Professor and Head 
of the Acquisitions Division, Libraries. 

Huey Ingles Borders, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Plant Pathologist, Tifton, Georgia, 
U.S.D.A. 

Arthur Gibbon Bovee, Ph.B.. Certificat de l'Association Phonetique Interna- 
tionale, Professor of the Teaching of French. 

Roy Alva Bowden, B.S.A., M.S., Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

Calhoun Austin Bowen, A.B., Captain, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics. 

George Hugh Boyd. A.B., M.S., Sc.D., Professor of Zoology, Head of the De- 
partment of Biology, Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences, 
and Dean of the Graduate School. 



♦On leave. 



14 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Hudson Lester Boyd, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Agronomist. 

Nellie Clyde Boyd, B.S., M.S., Associate Home Economist-Nutrition, Agri- 
cultural Extension. 

Clyde Irwin Boyer, Jr., D.V.M., Associate Veterinarian, Tifton, Georgia. 

Lytton Wesley Boyle, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist, Experi- 
ment, Georgia. 

Vivian Branch, A.B., A.B. in L.S., Instructor and Reference Librarian. 

Frances Hoff Brandon, A.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of History. 

Blake Bridges Brantley, Jr., B.S., M.S., Assistant Horticulturist, Experi- 
ment, Georgia. 

Donald LeRoy Branyon, B.S.A., M.S.A., Associate Agronomist, Agricultural 
Extension. 

*Erwin Millard Breithaupt, B.F.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

William Thomas Brightwell, B.S., M.S.A., Associate Horticulturist, Tifton, 
Georgia. 

Alfred Lenneth Britt, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Pathology 
and Parasitology. 

Ruth Tuck Broach, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Associate Home Economist — Food 
Preservation, Agricultural Extension. 

Kathleen Drake Broadhurst, B.S. Ed., A.M.Ed., B.S. in L.S., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education and Education Librarian. 

Charles Joseph Brockman, B.A., Ch.E., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Carl William Brockseker, Research Assistant in Agricultural Engineering, 
U.8.D.A. 

Dvon Brogan, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist, Experiment, Georgia. 

♦Orien Leffretts Brooks, B.S., Associate Agronomist. Blairsville, Georgia. 

Robert Preston Brooks, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Emeritus 
Dean of Faculties. 

**Acton Richard Brown, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agron- 
omy. 

Calvin Smith Brown, A.B., B.A. (Oxon.), M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Harry Lowrance Brown, B.S.A., D.Sc, Dean Emeritus of the College of Agri- 
culture and Director Emeritus of the Experiment Station. 

**Robert Henry Brown, B.S.E.E., B.S.A.E., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of 
Agricultural Engineering. 

Walter Scott Brown, B.S.A., Professor in Extension Service and Associate 
Director of the Agricultural Extension Service. 

Edmund Broadus Browne, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Plant Breeding 
and Resident Director of the College Experiment Station. 

*On leave. 
**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE FACULTY 15 



Sibyl Browne, A.B., B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Art. 

James Albert Browning, B.S., Part-time Instructor in Chemistry. 

William Mercer Bruce, B.S.A.E., Research Associate in Agricultural Engi- 
neering and Agricultural Engineer, U.S.D.A. 

Anne Wallis Brumby, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of French. 

*Charles James Bryant, B.S.A., Associate Agricultural Economist, Agricul- 
tural Extension. 

James Garlin Bryant, B.S.A., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Edu- 
cation. 

Charles Merlyn Buess, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

James Whitney Bunting. B.S., M.A.. M.B.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics 
and Director of the Bureau of Business Research. 

John Francis Burke, B.B.A., M.B.A., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting and 
Assistant Director of the Bureau of Business Research. 

James Herbert Burkhalter, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Walter Clinton Burkhart, B.S., D.V.M., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Duncan Burnett, Professor Emeritus, Libraries. 

Reba Mae Bubnham, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Betty Jean Burns. B.S.H.E., Instructor in Institution Management and Di- 
rector of the Home Economics Tea Room. 

Robert Emmett Burns, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Plant Physiologist, Experiment, 
Georgia, U.8.D.A. 

Wilkie Collins Burt. Colonel. U.S.A., Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics. 

Glenn Willard Burton, B.S.A., M.A., Ph.D., Principal Geneticist and Chair- 
man of the Division of Agronomy, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

James Lee Butler. B.S., M.S.. Assistant Agricultural Engineer. Experiment, 
Georgia. 

Marion Tyus Butler, A.B.J., M.A., Associate Professor of Journalism. 

James Wallace Butts, Jr., A.B., Associate Professor of Health and Physical 
Education, Head Football Coach, and Director of Intercollegiate Ath- 
letics. 

Elon Eugene Byrd, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Woodrow R. Byrum, B.S. in Pharm., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy. 

Harmon Eldred Calkins, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriol- 
ogy. 

Iris Callaway, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 
Matilda Callaway, B.S.H.E.. M.A.. Associate Professor of Home Economics 
and Acting Head of the Department of Management and Economics. 



'On leave. 



16 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Albert Byron Calloway, A.B., B.S., M.A., Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Edu- 
cation. 

Paul Alfred Camp, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Drama. 

William Andrew Campbell, B.S., A.M., Ph.D., Research Associate in Forest 
Pathology and U.S.D.A. Pathologist. 

Gertrude Ellington Cantrell, A.B.Ed., A.M., B.S. in L.S., Instructor and 
Cataloguer, Libraries. 

Annie Carlton, Instructor Emeritus, Libraries. 

William Marion Carlton, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Joseph Pledger Carmiciiael. A.B.J.. Associate Editor, Agricultural Extension. 

James Lavery Carmon, B.S.A., M.S., Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 

John Russell Carreker, B.S., M.S., Research Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering and Agricultural Engineer, Soil Conservation Service, U.S.D.A. 

Robert Leonidas Carter, B.S.C., M.S., Soil Scientist, Tifton, Georgia. 

William Clifton Carter, B.S.A., Associate Agricultural Economist, Agri- 
cultural Extension. 

Samuel Reber Cecil, B.S., Associate Food Technologist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Rollin Chambliss, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 

Sidney Grigsby Chandler, B.S.A., District Agent, Agricultural Extension. 

John Elmer Champion, B.B.A., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Claude Chance, A.B., M.A., Professor of French. 

Francis Chapix, B.S., Visiting Professor of Art. 

Paul Wilber Chapman, B.S.A., B.S.Ed., M.S.A., Sc.D., Professor of Agricul- 
ture and Associate Dean of Instruction of the College of Agriculture. 

Walter Lonnie Chapman, B.S.F., Assistant Forester, Agricultural Extension, 
Tifton, Georgia. 

A. Aldo Charles, B.S., LL.B., M.Ed., D.Ed., Professor of Economics. 

Noble Dooly Clark, B.S.H.E., Instructor in Child Development. 

Ernest Jackson Claxton, Jr., B.S., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in Industrial Arts in the Demonstration School. 

Thomas Milburn Clyburn, B.S.A.. Assistant Animal Husbandman, Tifton, 
Georgia. 

"♦Carlisle Cobb, Jr., A.B., B.S.A.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

Kate McKinley Cobb, Illustrator, Agricultural Extension. 

Samuel Jefferson Cobb, Sr., B.B.A., M.B.A., Statistician. Bureau of Business 
Research. 

**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE FACULTY 17 



Howaed Templeton Coggin, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemis- 
try and Adviser to Pre-Medical Students. 

Alonzo Clifford Cohen, B.S., M.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

Sigmund Albert Cohn, J.D., Professor of Law. 

Lurline Cot.t.teb, B.S.H.E., State Home Demonstration Agent and Chairman 
of the Division of Home Economics, Agricultural Extension. 

Mobbis William Hollowell Collins, Jr., B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of 

Political Science. 

♦♦Willl\m Olix Collins. B.S.A.. Professor of Agronomy and Head of the De- 
partment of Agronomy. 

Chables Dewey Cooper, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Donald Elmer Cooperrider, D.V.M., M.Sc, Associate Professor of Veterinary 
Pathology and Parasitology. 

Otis Bryant Copeland, B.S.A., Editor, Agricultural Extension. 

Ellis Merton Coulter, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Litt.D., Regents' Professor of His- 
tory, Head of the Department of History, and Chairman of the Division 
of Social Sciences. 

Fred Frazier Cowart, B.S., Ph.D., Horticulturist and Resident Director of 
the Georgia Experiment Station, Experiment, Georgia. 

♦Johnnie V. Cox, B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Sadie Menzies Craig, B.L., B.S., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in Science and Mathematics in the Demonstration School. 

♦Julian Pryor Craigmii.es, B.S., M.S.. Associate Agronomist, Experiment, 
Georgia. 

Paul Augustus Crawford, Jb., B.S.A.E., Assistant Agricultural Engineer, 
Agricultural Extension. 

Mary Ethel Cbeswell, B.S.H.E.. Dean Emeritus of the School of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

**Otis Everett Cross. B.S.A.E.. M.S.A.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering. 

Loy Van Crowder. B.S., M.S., Ph.D.. Associate Pasture Specialist. Experiment. 
Georgia. 

♦♦Arthur Edison Cullison. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
Head of the Department of Animal Husbandry, and Chairman of the Di- 
vision of Animal Husbandry. 

**Lawrence Cowlex Curtis. B.S.. Ph.D.. Professor of Horticulture. 

Walter Newman Danner, Jr., B.S.A.E., M.S.A., Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering, Registrar, and Director of Admissions. 



*On leave. 
**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



18 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Arthur Franklin Darden, B.S.C., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Agri- 
cultural Extension. 

♦Forrest Neal Davenport, B.S.A., Assistant Dairyman and Creamery Super- 
intendent. 

Uriah Harrold Davenport, B.S., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

William Wallace Davidson, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

Walter James Davies, Major, U.S.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

James Franklin Deal, B.S.A., Assistant Dairyman and Dairy Farm Manager. 

♦Katherine Imogene Dean, B.S., M.Ed., Instructor in Sociology. 

William Lee Deck, B.B.A., Major, USAF, Assistant Professor of Air Science 
and Tactics. 

Ocie Thomas Dekle, B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in the Demonstration School. 

Wymberley Wormsloe DeRenne, A.B., Assistant Professor and Archivist, 
Libraries. 

Earl Hoyt DeVane, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Agronomist, Tifton, Georgia, 
U.8.DA. 

Lee Bryan DeYoung, B.S., Technical Assistant to the Coordinator, Regional 
Primary Plant Introduction Station, Experiment, Georgia. 

James Lewis Dickerson, A.B., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of Education, 
Director of Student Teaching, and Principal of the Demonstration School. 

Vincent Jean Dieball, B.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Ellis Howard Dixon, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
and Head of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. 

Willis Frank Dobbs, B.S., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Coordinator 
Special Services, Division of General Extension. 

Lamar Dodd, L.H.D., Regents' Professor of Art and Head of the Department 
of Art. 

Inez Dolvin, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education and Member of 
the Staff, Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service. 

Harry Gordon Doran, Jr., B.S., D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 
Medicine and Surgery. 

♦William Clark Doster, A.B., M.A., Instructor in English. 

John Andrew Dotson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education and Dean 
of the College of Education. 

Willie Vie Dowdy, B.S.H.E., Home Economist — Home Improvement, Agricul- 
tural Extension. 

John Ayman Downs, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of French. 
•On leave. 



THE FACULTY 



Alice Gorton Drake, B.S.H.E., District Agent, Agricultural Extension. 

♦♦Leland Overby Drew, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering. 

John Eldridge Drewry, A.B., B.J., A.M., Professor of Journalism and Dean 

of the School of Journalism. 

* :: Rudolph Henry Driftmler, B.S.A.E., M.S., A.E., Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering. Head of the Department of Agricultural Engineering, and 
Chairman of the Division of Agricultural Engineering. 

Marion Derrelle DuBose, A.B., M.A., Professor Emeritus of German. 

Llewellyn Goode Duggar, B.S.. Colonel, USAF, Professor of Air Science and 
Tactics. 

♦♦♦Thomas Glenn Dulin, A.B., Assistant Chemist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Marie Francis Dumas, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of English and Co- 
ordinator of Freshman English. 

Nolee May Dunaway, A.B., Instructor in Music. 

Amon Ocyrus Duncan, B.S.A., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of Agricultural 
Education. 

♦Talmadge Edward Duncan, B.S.A.E., Agricultural Engineer, Experiment, 
Georgia. 

Wilbur Howard Duncan, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

William Land Duncan, B.A., B.S. in L.S., M.S., Instructor and Cataloguer, 
Libraries. 

James Elton Dunn, B.S. A.. Temporary Part-time Instructor in Agricultural' 
Education. 

Linton Reese Dunson, B.S.A., Assistant State J t -H Club Leader, Agricultural 
Extension. 

Minter DuPree, Assistant Entomologist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Weldon Ellis DuPree, Assistant Food Technologist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Patrick DuVal, B.Sc, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Hilda Gunter Dyches, B.S., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in 
the Demonstration School. 

Clarence Dorsey Dyer, B.S.F., Associate Forester, Agricultural Extension, 
Tifton, Georgia. 

**Irwin Allen Dyer, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Animal 
Husbandry. 

Margaret Dykes, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Assistant Professor of Nutrition and 
Institution Management. 



♦On leave. 

**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 
'♦♦Died August 16, 1951. 



20 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Charles Broughton Earnest, B.S.A., Assistant Nutritionist, Agricultural Ex- 
tension. 

David Lewis Earnest, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Linton Webster Eberhardt, B.S.F., District Agent, Agricultural Extension. 

Stacy Knight Ebert, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in Elementary Education in the Demonstraiton School. 

Austin Southwick Edwards, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Dorothea Ann Edwards, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Instructor in Education and 
Critic Teacher in the Demonstration School. 

John Olin Eidson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English, Director of the 
Coordinate Campus, and Editor of the Georgia Review. 

Mamie McRee Elliott, A.B., M.A. Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

Carlton Case Ellis, B.S., M.S., D.V.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Veteri- 
nary Pathology and Parasitology. 

John Charles Elrod, B.A., M.S., Associate Agricultural Economist, Experi- 
ment, Georgia. 

Julius Mitchell Elrod, B.S., M.S., Associate Agronomist, Experiment, Geor- 
gia. 

Robert David Entenberg, B.S.B.A., M.S.B.A., Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics. 

Clara Eppes Evans, A.B., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in Ele- 
mentary Education in the Demonstration School. 

Edwin Mallard Everett, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English, Head of the 
Department of English, and Chairman of the Division of Language and 
Literature. 

William T. Ezzard, B.S.A., Captain, AUS, Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 

John~William Fanning, B.S.A., M.S.A., Extension Economist and Chairman 
of the Division of Agricultural Economics. 

Louise Lesly Fant, A.B.Ed., B.S. in L.S., M.A., Assistant Professor and Head 
of the Documents Division, Libraries. 

Lloyd Edward Farmer, B.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Exten- 
sion. 

David Meade Feild, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

George Henry Firor, B.S.A., Horticulturist, Agricultural Extension. 

John William Firor, B.S., M.S.A., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. 

Frank Williams Fitch, B.S.A., Dairyman, Agricultural Extension. 

**Attie Anderson Fleming, B.S.Ag.Ed., M.S.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
of Plant Pathology. 



'Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE FACULTY 21 



♦Kenneth Eldo Ford, B.S., M.S., Associate Agricultural Economist, Experi- 
ment, Georgia. 

♦James Fletcher Forehand. B.S.A.E., Assistant Agricultural Engineer, Agri- 
cultural Extension. 

♦Carolyn Vance Foreman. A.B.. M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. 

Tomlinson Fort, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Regents' Professor of Mathematics and 
Head of the Department of Mathematics. 

John W. Foster, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Hygiene. 

Wayne Henry Freeman, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Agronomist, Tifton, Georgia, 
U.S.D.A. 

A Lee French. B.S.A.. M.S.A.. Captain, USAF, Assistant Professor of Air 
Science and Tactics. 

Evelyn Mae Fritz, A.B., A.B. in L.S., M.A., Associate Professor and Asso- 
ciate Director of Libraries. 

^Robert Lawrence Froemke, B.S.. M.S.. Assistant Professor of Business Ad- 
ministration. 

Byard Owens Fry, B.S., Associate Horticulturist, Experiment, Georgia. 

James Teasley Frye. B.B.A., M.B.A.. Temporary Instructor in Business Ad- 
ministration. 

Henry Lester Feller. B.S.. M.S.. Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Poultry Hus- 
bandry and Associate Poultry Husbandman. Branch Experiment Station. 

William Thomas Fullii.ove. B.S.A.. Agricultural Economist and Head of tTie 
Department of Agricultural Economics. Experiment. Georgia. 

John Gordon Futral. B.S.. Associate Agricultural Engineer and Head of the 
Department of Agricultural Engineering, Experiment, Georgia. 

Bramwell W. C. Gabrtelsen, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of Health and 
Physical Education. 

John Gordon Gaines, B.S., M.S., Plant Pathologist, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Arthur Francis Gannon, B.S.A., M.S., Poultryman, Agricultural Extension. 

Charles Gordon Garner, B.S.A., M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Agricul- 
tural Extension. 

Warren Edwin Garner, B.S.A.E., Research Assistant Professor of Agricul- 
tural Engineering. 

Karl Claudius Garrison, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

James Edward Gates, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Dean of the 

College of Business Administration. 
Edmond Joseph Gibson, B.S., Associate Pathologist and Superintendent, Shade 

Tobacco Station, Attapulgus, Georgia. 

Joel Edwin Giddens, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Assistant Soil Scientist and Di- 
rector of Soil Testing Service. 



'On leave. 



22 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

♦Boyce Moultrie Gilbert, Ph.G., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy. 

Denzell Leigh Gill, B.S.A., Ph.D., Horticulturist, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

John Howard Girardeau, Jr., B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Apiculturist, Tifton, 
Georgia. 

Raymond Lee Givens, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

Robert Lewis Givens, B.S.A.E., M.S., Research Associate in Agricultural Engi- 
neering and Agricultural Engineer, U.S.D.A. 

Ulys Roy Gore, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Agronomist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Rubin Gotesky, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy. 

Bishop Franklin Grant, B.S.F., M.S.F., Professor of Forest Utilization and 
Director of the Summer Camp. 

E. Louise Grant, R.N., B.S., M.A., Professor of Nursing Education and Head 
of the Department of Nursing Education. 

Benjamin Blanton Gray, Assistant Animal Husbandman and Farm Manager, 
College Experiment Station. 

John Stanley Gray, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Thomas Fitzgerald Green, Jr., A.B., LL.B., J.S.D., Professor of Law. 

James Edward Greene, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education and Chair- 
man of the Division of Graduate Studies, College of Education. 

Pauline Eupiia Griffin, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Instructor in Education and Li- 
brarian in the Demonstration School. 

Louis Turner Griffith, A.B.J., M.A., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 

Edward Scott Hagood, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Plant Physiologist, Experiment, 
Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Marion Hall, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Modern Foreign Languages. 

Lowell Keith Halls, A.B., M.S., Range Conservationist, Tifton, Georgia, 
U.S.D.A. 

Clara Eddy Hamilton, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

John Robert Hamilton, B.S.F., M.S.F., Associate Forester, Experiment, Geor- 
gia. 
*Leon Abraham Hargreaves, Jr., B.S.F., M.S.F., Instructor in Forestry. 

Dorothy Louise Harmer, A.B., B.A. in L.S., A.M. in L.S., Assistant Professor 
and Head of the Catalogue Division, Libraries. 

Silas Albert Harmon, B.S., Associate Horticulturist, Tifton, Georgia. 

Harold Jones Harpe, B.S.A., Temporary Part-time Instructor in Agricultural 

Education. 
Walton William Harper, B.S., M.S., Associate Agricultural Econoinist, Ex- 

periment, Georgia. 



♦On leave. 



THE FACULTY 23 



Haskell Byard Harris, B.S., M.S., Assistant Agronomist, Experiment, Geor- 
gia. 

♦John Thomas Harris, B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Experiment, 
Georgia. 

Roland Russell Harris, B.S.A., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering. 

Martha Roberts Harrison, B.S.H.E., Associate State 4-H Club Leader, Agri- 
cultural Extension. 

Oval Stanley Harrison, B.S., M.A., Ed.D., Professor of Industrial Arts. 

Robert Ivy Harrison, B.F.A.. Juilliard Graduate School, Part-time Associate 
Professor of Music. 

Allie Carroll Hart, A.B., M.A., Instructor and Cataloguer, Libraries. 

*John Fraser Hart, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography and 
Geology. 

Charles William Hartman, B.S. Pharm., Instructor in Pharmacy. 

Barney Stewart Hawkins, B.S., M.S., Assistant Agronomist, Experiment, 
Georgia, U.8.D.A. 

Dean Dillard Hayes, B.S.A., Superintendent of Branch Experiment Station, 
Calhoun, Georgia. 

Harold Milton Heckman, B.S.C., M.A., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting. 

George Edwin Henderson, B.S.A., Professor of Agricultural Engineering and 
Coordinator of the Southern Association of Agricultural Engineering and 
Vocational Agricultural Educators. 

♦♦Herbert Blair Henderson, B.S., M.S., Professor of Dairy, Head of the 
Dairy Department, and Chairman of the Dairy Division. 

William McLendon Henderson, A.B., LL.B., LL.M., Associate Professor of 
Law. 

Linvtjlle Laurentine Hendren, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of 
Physics and Astronomy and Emeritus Dean of Faculties. 

Bertram Hegbie Hendrickson, B.S., Project Supervisor, Southern Piedmont 
Conservation Experiment Station, Watkinsville, Georgia. 

Guider Foreman Henry, B.S.A., M.S.A., Agronomy Farm Manager. 

Robert Gilbert Henry, A.B., M.S., Associate Professor of Physics and Astron- 
omy. 

Opie C. Hester, B.S., M.S., Agricultural Economist. U.S.D.A. 

Mary Irma Hicks, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Clothing and Textiles. 

Lucile Alice Higginbotham, B.S.H.E., Assistant Home Economist — Clothing, 
Agricultural Extension. 



•On leave. 
••Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



24 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Bascombe Bbitt Higgins, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Plant Pathologist and Head of 
the Department of Botany, Experiment, Georgia. 

Pope Russell Hill, B.S.A., M.S., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

♦William Lawrence Hitchcock, B.S.A., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Educa- 
tion. 

Hugh Hodgson, B.S., Regents' Professor of Music, Head of the Department 
of Music, and Chairman of the Division of Fine Arts. 

Newton C. Hodgson, B.A., M.A., Visiting Professor of Education and Mem- 
ber of the Staff, Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service. 

Roberta Hodgson, A.B., M.A., Instructor Emeritus in History and Political 
Science. 

Alfred Hebeb Holbbook, A.B., L.L.B., Lecturer in Art and Curator of the 
Georgia Museum of Art. 

Kirk Theron Holley, B.S., Chemist and Head of the Department of Chemis- 
try, Experiment, Georgia. 

Annie May Holliday, B.S., Associate Professor of Art. 

Louise Hollingsworth, A.B., B.S., Instructor and Fine Arts Librarian. 

Maude Pye Hood, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Ph.D., Professor of Foods and Equip- 
ment, Chairman of Home Economics Research, School of Home Eco- 
nomics and College Station, Chairman of the Division of Housing and 
Equipment, and Head of the Department of Housing and Equipment. 

John Alton Hosch, B.S.C., M.A., LL.B., Professor of Law and Dean of the 
School of Law. 

Charles Franklin Hudgins, B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of Educa- 
tion. 

William Eugene Hudson, B.S.A.E., M.S.A.E., Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

Gerald Boone Huff, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Lawrence Huff, A.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Melvin Clyde Hughes, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political 
Science. 

*Till Monroe Huston, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Professor of Poultry Hus- 
bandry. 

Willis Earl Huston, B.S.A.E., Assistant Agricultural Engineer, Agricultural 
Extension. 

Henry Grady Hutcherson, B.S.Ed., M.A., Instructor in English. 

George Alexander Hutchinson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of 
Sociology. 

Hugh Alexander Inglis, B.S.A., M.S.A., Associate Agronomist — Seed Certifi- 
cation, Agricultural Extension. 



*On leave. 



THE FACULTY 25 



Catheeine Fbancis Jackson, A.B., A.B. in L.S., Instructor and Cataloguer, 
Libraries. 

Lyle Wendell Redveese Jackson, B.S.F., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Silvicul- 
ture. 

Donald Leboy Jacobs, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Edwin James, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Coordinator, Regional Primary Plant Intro- 
duction Station, Experiment, Georgia. 

William Thomas James, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Milton Pbeston Jabnagin, B.S., M.Agr., Sc.D., Animal Husbandman, Agri- 
cultural Extension. 

Julian G. Jenkins, Agronomist, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

James Hobabt Jenkins, B.Sc, M.Sc, Part-time Instructor in Forestry. 

*Edvabd Abthub Johnson, B.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Glenn Ibvin Johnson, B.S.A.E., Agricultural Engineer, Agricultural Exten- 
sion. 

John Ralph Johnson, B.S., Assistant Agronomist, Agricultural Extension. 

Joseph Calbebt Johnson, Jb., B.S., M.S.. Assistant Dairy Husbandman, Tif- 
ton, Georgia. 

Lillian Brown Johnson, A.B., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in English and Social Studies in the Demonstration School. 

""Francis Elliott Johnstone, Jr., B.S., M.S.. Ph.D.. Professor of Horticulture, 
Head of the Department of Horticulture, and Chairman of the Division 
of Horticulture. 

Albebt Bruce Jones, A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law and Assistant 
to the Dean of Faculties. 

David Jefferson Jones, Agricultural Aid, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Emily Jones, A.B., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in Ele- 
mentary Education in the Demonstration School. 

♦Garrett Jones, B.S.A., Assistant Dairy Husbandman, Tifton, Georgia. 

Len Stuckey Jones, B.S., Assistant Soil Chemist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Thomas John Jones, B.S.A., D.V.M., M.S.A., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary 
Medicine and Surgery and Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine. 

Wilbur Devereux Jones, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Floyd Jordan, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education and Coordinator of 

the Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service. 
Howard Sheldon Jordan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of French and Head of 

the Department of Modern Foreign Languages. 
Frank Kaley, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in the 

Demonstration School. 



*On leave. 
**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



26 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Abe B. Kamine, Ph.G., D.V.M., Associate Professor of Veterinary Physiology 
and Pharmacology. 

Arthur Kaplan, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Classics. 

Despy (Skourlas) Kaklas, B.A., Juilliard Graduate School, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Music. 

Effie Lou Keaster, B.A., M.Ed., Associate Professor of Health and Physical 
Education. 

Rufus LaFayette Keener, B.S.A., M.S.A., Professor of Horticulture. 

William Porter Kellam, A.B., A.M., A.B. in L.S., Professor and Director of 
Libraries. 

Edgar William Keller, B.S.A., M.S.A., Major, USAF, Assistant Professor of 
Air Science and Tactics. 

Arthur Randolph Kelly, A.B.. M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Anthropology and 
Archaeology and Head of the Department of Anthropology and Archae- 
ology. 

Luctle Kimble, A.B., Associate Professor of Music. 

**Drayton Tucker Kinard, B.S.A.E., M.S.A.E., Associate Professor of Agri- 
cultural Engineering. 

Roger E. Kindig, Lieutenant Colonel, USAF, Assistant Professor of Air Science 
and Tactics. 

Frank Pickett King, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Agricultural Economist and Resi- 
dent Director of the Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station, Tifton, 
Georgia. 

George Harris King, B.S.A., M.S.A., Research Professor of Agriculture and 
Associate Director of Experiment Stations. 

William Anson King, B.S.A., Associate Agricultural Economist, Agricultural 
Extension. 

Albert L. Kleckner, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Hygiene, Head 
of the Department of Veterinary Hygiene, and Director of Veterinary 
Research. 

Pauline Park Wilson Knapp. B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Home Eco- 
nomics, Dean of the School of Home Economics, and Coordinator of the 
Extension and Research. 

William Arnold Knapp, Jr.. D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Medi- 
cine and Surgery. 

Franklin Ezra Knox, A.B., Biochemist, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Sallie Sue Koon, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Management. 

Frederick Edward Kopp, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Music. 

*Walter Kornfeld, B.S.A., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Physiology 
and Pharmacology. 



♦On leave. 
'♦Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE FACULTY 



George Miloslav Kozelnicky, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Plant Pathologist. 

Rudolph Kratina, Part-time Associate Processor of Music. 

Martha LaBoon, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Instructor in Child Development. 

Elisabeth LaBoone, A.B., A.B. in L.S., Assistant Professor and Head of the 
Public Service Division, Libraries: 

Leo Francis Labyak, B.S.F., M.F,. D.F., Temporary Instructor in Forestry. 

James Frederick Lahey, Ph.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of Geography and 
Geology. 

Delmon William LaHue, B.S., M.S., Entomologist, Tifton, Georgia, U.8.D.A. 

Sarah Bailey Lamar, Instructor and Coordinate Campus Librarian. 

William Bryan Land, B.S.A.E., B.S.M.E., Research Assistant in Agricultural 
Engineering and Agricultural Engineer, Soil Conservation Service, 
U.S.D.A. 

Leicester Llwellhynn Landon, B.S., D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veteri- 
nary Medicine and Surgery. 

Katherine Dreese Lanier, B.S.H.E., Home Economist — Food Preservation, 
Agricultural Extension. 

Lonnie Richard Lanier, B.S.A., District Agent, Agricultural Extension. 

Joseph Paul LaRocca, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy. 

Harbin Bailey Lawson, B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Assistant Professor of Health and 
Physical Education. 

Gabriel Anton Lebedeff, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Agronomist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Mildred Pierce Ledford, B.S.Ed., M.A., Assistant Home Economist — Home 
Industries, Agricultural Extension. 

James Jefferson Lenoir, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.B., LL.M.. Professor of Laic. 

Robert Jules Levit, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Clifford Gray Lewis, B.S. in Phys. Ed., M.A., Assistant Professor of Health 
and Physical Education. 

Robert Lorenz, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

Horace Odin Lund, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Entomology and Chairman 
of the Department of Biology. 

Everett Stanley Luttrell, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist, Ex- 
periment, Georgia. 

Martha Irvine McAlpine, A.B., Home Economist — Child Development and 
Parent Education, Agricultural Extension. 

William Conner McCormick, B.S.A., M.S.A., Associate Animal Husbandman, 
Tifton, Georgia. 

Kathryne Moore McCraney, B.S.H.E., Laboratory Instructor in Child De- 
velopment. 



28 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Roy Julian McCraney, B.S.A.E., Research Assistant in Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

Marshall Edward McCullough, B.S.A., M.S. A., Assistant Dairy Husband- 
man, Experiment, Georgia. 

Earl Stuart McCutchen, B.F.A., M.A., Assistant Processor of Art. 

*William Worth McDougald, A.B., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 

John Edwin McGowan, B.S.A., Assistant Dairyman, Agricultural Extension. 

Thomas Hubbard McHatton, B.S., M.Hort., D.Sc, Professor Emeritus of 
Horticulture. 

William Hardy McKinney, B.S.A., Assistant Animal Husbandman, Blairs- 
ville, Georgia. 

Walter Floyd McLendon, D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Sur- 
gery and Head of the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery. 

♦Chalmers Alexander McMahan, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Sociology. 

Thomas Leverett McMullan, B.S.A., Administrative Assistant, Agricultural 
Extension. 

Margaret Elizabeth McPhaul, B.S.H.E., M.A., Associate Professor of Child 
Development. 

John Hanson Thomas McPherson, A.B., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of His- 
tory and Political Science. 

Neal Duncan McRainey, B.S.A., Superintendent of the Branch Experiment 
Station, Americus, Georgia. 

Ellen Rhodes McWhorter, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

♦Hezzie Boyd McWhorter, B.S., A.M., Instructor in English. 

Robert Ligon McWhorter, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Wesley Augustus Mackenzie, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 
Medicine and Surgery. 

John Henry Machmer, A.B., Associate Nematologist, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

James Henry Madden, B.F.A., M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

James Nelson Maddux, B.S., M.S., Assistant Animal Husbandman, Tifton, 
Georgia. 

Eugene Pennington Mallary, B.L., LL.B., M.A., Associate Professor Emeri- 
tus of Philosophy. 

Laura Powers Marbut, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education and 
Critic Teacher in Social Science in the Demonstration School. 

Warren Harding Marchant, B.S.A., Assistant Agronomist, Tifton, Georgia. 

♦James Edwin Martin, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Physics. 



*On leave. 



THE FACULTY 29 



Sidney Walter Martin, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of History and Dean of 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Eugene Richard Martini, B.F.A. in L.A., Visiting Critic, Department of Land- 
scape Architecture. 

Bernard Stephen Martof, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Temporary Assistant Professor 
of Biology. 

John Hubert Masset, B.S., M.S., Soil Technician, Blairsville, Georgia. 

Eugene Mather, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geography and 
Geology. 

Susan Josephine Mathews, A.B., B.S., M.A,. Home Economist — Nutrition, 
Agricultural Extension. 

John Frank Mauldin, B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Agricul- 
tural Extension. 

John Cassius Meadows, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 

Helen Virginia Michaelis, A.B., A.B. in L.S., Assistant Professor and South 
Branch Librarian. 

Cora Ann Miller, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation. 

**Julian Howell Miller, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., Regents' Professor of Plant 
Pathology and Plant Breeding, Head of the Department of Plant Path- 
ology and Plant Breeding, and Chairman of the Division of Plant Path- 
ology. 

**Russell Lee Miller, B.S.A., Temporary Instructor in Agronomy. 

Sara Josephine Miller, B.S., Assistant Home Economist, Experiment, Geor- 
gia. 

Francis Ford Mlllikan, B.S.Pharm., M.S.Pharm., M.S.Chem., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy. 

Lionel Woodrow Mills, B.S.A., Temporary Instructor in Food Technology. 

Thomas Hamilton Mllner, Jr., LL.B., Lecturer in the School of Veterinary 
Medicine, Clinics and Medicine. 

Leonora Mirone, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nutrition and Head 
of the Department of Foods and Nutrition. 

James Harris Mitchell, B.A., Associate Professor of Music and Adivser to 
B.F.A. Students. 

John Herbert Mitchell, M.S.Ed., Asssitant Supervisor of Agricultural Itin- 
erant Teacher Training. 

William Grant Mitchell, Jr., A.B., Assistant Editor, Experiment, Georgia. 

Horace Montgomery, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of History and 
Adviser to A.B. Students. 



'Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



30 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Pearl Campbell Moon, B.S.H.E., M.A., Associate Professor Erneritus of Home 
Management. 

Flobide Moobe, B.S.H.E., M.S., Associate Professor of Teacher Education in 
Home Economics. 

Audbey Matilda Morgan, B.S., District Agent, Agricultural Extension. 

Loy Weston Mobgan, B.S., M.S., Assistant Entomologist, Tifton, Georgia. 

♦♦Harold Donald Morris, B.S.. M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

John Morris, A.B., M.A., B.L., Professor Emeritus of German. 

>l Van Cleve Morris, A.B., M.A., Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education and 
Research Assistant in Bureau of Educational Studies and Field Services. 

♦♦Spencer Horton Morrison, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dairy. 

Matthew McIlhenny Murphy, Assistant Horticulturist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Calvin Clyde Murray, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy, Dean of the 
College of Agriculture, and Director of the Experiment Stations and Ex- 
tension Service. 

Lawrence John Nachtrab, B.S.A.E., C.A.A. Rated, C.E., Associate Professor 
of Business Administration. 

Ivan Neas, B.S., M.S., Agronomist, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Walter Edward Neville, Jb., B.S.A., M.S., Assistant Animal Hiisbandma7u 
Experiment, Georgia. 

Walter Edward Neville, Sr., Apiculturist, Agricultural Extension. 

Catherine Lowrance Newton, B.S.H.E., M.A., Professor of Foods and Nu- 
trition and Assistant to the Dean of the School of Home Economics. 

Charlotte Newton, B.A., M.A. in L.S., Part-time Instructor and Cataloguer, 
Libraries. 

Theodore Edward Nichols, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Abit Nix, A.B., LL.B., LL.D., Part-time Instructor in Law. 

Victob Chalmers Nix, B.S.Ed., Instructor in Industrial Arts Education. 

Cliffobd Newell Nolan, B.S.A., Soil Technician, Tifton, Georgia. 

John E. Noland, B.S.A., Captain, AUS, Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

Clio Cbosby Noebis, A.B., Assistant Director of the Bureau of Business Re- 
search. 

Willimenta Norris, B.S.H.E., Technician. Department of Food Technology. 

John William Nuttycombe, B.S.Chem., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Annie Ida Obenshain, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

Eugene Pleasants Odum, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 



'Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE FACULTY 31 



George Ligon O'Kelley, Jr., B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Agricultural Education. 

Jane Oliver, B.A., B.L.S., Assistant Professor and Law Librarian. 

Edna Howard Olson, B.S., Librarian, Experiment, Georgia. 

Lawrence Carroll Olson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Boil Chemist, Experiment, Geor- 
gia. 

Rorert Travis Osborne, A.B., M.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psy- 
chology and Director of the Veterans Guidance Center. 

**Hubert Bond Owens, B.S.A., M.A., Professor of Landscape Architecture, 
Head of the Department of Landscape Architecture, Chairman of the Di- 
vision of Landscape Architecture, and Director of the Founders Memorial 
Garden. 

Jack Roles Palmer, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Medicine and 
Surgery. 

Anne Olivia Palmour, A.B., M.A., Instructor in English. 

Stith Anderson Parham, B.S.A., Agronomist and Head of the Department 
of Agronomy, Tifton, Georgia. 

Eldon Joseph Parizek, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography 
and Geology. 

Edward Milton Parker, B.S., M.S., Assistant Pasture Specialist, Experiment, 
Georgia. 

Myron Bart Parker, B.S., Assistant Agronomist, Blairsville, Georgia. 

Sammie Bell Parkman, B.S.A., M.S., Assistant Agronomist, Tifton, Georgia. 

Edd Winfield Parks, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Archie Edgar Patterson, B.S., M.A., Professor of Forest Management. 

Joseph John Paul, Ph.B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Elinor Pearson, B.S., M.S., Associate Home Economist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Newton Mack Penny, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Agricultural Economist, Experi- 
ment, Georgia. 

Henry Frank Perkins, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Agronomist. Soil Testing 
Service. 

Dorothy Perry, B.S. in Phys. Ed., M.A., Instructor in Health and Physical 
Education. 

Helen Loftis Perry, B.S., M.Ed., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

John Samuel Peters, B.S., Assistant Professor of Journalism and Head of 
the Printing Department. 

Johnnie Inez Peterson, A.B., M.A., Instructor in Spanish. 

Paul Eugene Pfeutze, B.S., M.A., B.D., Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and 
Head of the Department of Philosophy. 



♦•Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



32 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Hazel Philbrick, Instructor and Reserve Book Librarian. 

George Edwin Philbrook, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Thomas Austin Pickett, B.S., M.S., Associate Chemist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Paul Laverne Piercy, D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Physiology and Phar- 
macology and Head of the Department of Veterinary Physiology and 
Pharmacology. 

William Carter Pollard, B.A., Instructor and Business Administration Li- 
brarian. 

♦John McFerrin Pollock, B.S., B.A.A., M.S., Assistant Professor of Industrial 
Arts. 

♦James Edwin Popovich, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Drama. 

Merritt Bloodworth Pound, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Political Science 
and Head of the Department of Political Science. 

Frank Taylor Powell, B.S.Ed.. M.S.Ed., Part-time Instructor in Education. 

**John Joseph Powers, B.S.. Ph.D., Associate Professor of Food Technology 
and Acting Head of the Department of Food Technology. 

John Preston, B.S.A., M.S. A., Assistant Agronomist, Agricultural Extension, 
Tifton, Georgia. 

**Roy Estes Proctor, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics and Acting Head of the Department of Agricultural Economics. 

Merle Charles Prunty, Jr., B.S., A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Geography 
and Geology and Head of the Department of Geography and Geology. 

Edwin Davis Pusey, A.B., M.A., LL.D., Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Elmo Ragsdale, B.S.A., Horticulturist, Agricultural Extension. 

Willard Edgar Allen Range, A.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of Political 
Science. 

Harvey Walter Rankin, B.S.A., M.S.A., Plant Pathologist, Tifton, Georgia. 

Einar Rasmussen, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Business Administration. 

Bernard Michael Reges, B.S., Biological Aid, Experiment, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Charles Erskine Rice, B.S.A.E., M.S., Assistant Agricultural Engineer, Tif- 
ton, Georgia. 

Albert Goldwin George Richardson, Professor Emeritus of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

Joel Condor Richardson, B.S.A., Distrcit Agent, Agricultural Extension. 

Robert James Richardson, B.S.A., Associate State Jf-H Club Leader. 

Elizabeth Riley, A.B.Ed., A.B. in L.S., Instructor and Gift and Exchange 
Librarian. 

Alfred Ernest Ritchie, B.S., M.S., Assistant Chemist, Experiment, Georgia. 



•On leave. 
**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE FACULTY 33 



Fbank Telford Ritchie, B.S., State Soil Scientist, Soil Conservation Service, 
U.S.D.A. 

Horace Bonab Ritchie, A.B., M.A., Professor of Education. 

>^ Gebald Buens Robins, B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Instructor in Distributive Education. 

Bubett Pbesley Robinson, B.S., M.S., Turf Sppecialist, Tifton, Georgia. 

Vibgil Benton Robinson, D.V.M., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Veterinary Path- 
ology and Parasitology and Head of the Department of Veterinary Path- 
ology and Parasitology. 

Paul Dean Rodgers, A.B., B.S.M.E., M.S.A.E., Associate Agricultural Engi- 
neer. 

K. ♦Costic Roman, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Business Administration. 

Charles Monboe Rose, B.S.A., M.Ed., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in Agricultural Education in the Demonstration School. 

Ila Rooks, A.B., M.Ed,. Temporary Part-time Instructor in Education. 

Eddye Belle Ross, B.S.H.E., District Agent, Agricultural Extension. 

♦♦Waldo Swinton Rowan, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Economics. 

Eileen Russell, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation. 

Rachel Joyce Rutherford, B.S., M.S., Instructor in Housing and Equipment 
and Research Assistant in Home Economics. College of Agriculture. 

Wiley DeVere Sanderson, Jr., B.F.A., M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Fred Bradley Saunders, B.S.A., M.S.A., Instructor in Agricultural Economics. 

♦James Russell Saunders, D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Medicine and 
Surgery. 

Earl Frederick Savage, B.S., Ph.D., Horticulturist and Head of the Depart- 
ment of Horticulture, Experiment, Georgia. 

Albert Berby Saye, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 

Julia Schnebly, B.M., M.M., Temporary Instructor in Music. 

Henby William Schoenbobn, A.B., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Alfbed Withebspoon Scott, B.S., Ph.D., Terrell Professor of Chemistry, Head 
of the Department of Chemistry, Chairman of the Division of Physical 
Sciences, and Faculty Chairman of Athletics. 

♦Donald Chables Scott, B.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

Maby Hughie Scott, B.S., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in Ele- 
mentary Education in the Demonstration School. 

William Owen Nixon Scott, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Educa- 
tion. 



•On leave. 
••Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



34 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

William Clifton Seabs, BJL, M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

William Hulse Seabs, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Archaeology. 

Gbegob Sebba, Dr. of Pol. Sci., Dr. of Law, Professor of Economics. 

Robebt Taylob Segbest, B.S.C., M.S.C., Professor of Economics and Associate 
Dean of the College of Business Administration. 

Edwabd Scott Sell, B.S.A., M.S.A., Professor Emeritus of Geography. 

Otto Edwin Sell, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Pasture Specialist and Head of the De- 
partment of Animal Industry, Experiment, Georgia. 

Ebza Lee Sellebs, B.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

James Halle Shands, B.S., Assistant Pasture Specialist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Karl Eastman Shedd, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 

Elbebt Thedbick Shellhobse. B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Ag- 
ricultural Extension. 

Ethyl Shelob, B.S.H.E., Assistant Food Technologist, Experiment, Georgia. 

*James Livingston Shepherd, B.S.M.E., B.S.A.E.. Agricultural Engineer, Tif- 
ton, Georgia. 

**John Joseph Sheubing, B.S.. M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dairy. 

Lynn Shtjfelt, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor of Education and Member of 
the Staff, Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service. 

Saba Weaveb Siewebt, B.S.H.E., Assistant Food Technologist, Experiment, 
Georgia. 

♦♦Joseph Winslow Simons, B.S.A.E., M.S.A.E.. Research Professor of Agri- 
cultural Engineering and Agricultural Engineer, U.S.D.A. 

Flobence Alice Simpson, A.B.Ed., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in Mathematics in the Demonstration School. 

Stanton James Singleton, A.B. Ed., M.A., Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Edu- 
cation. 

William Lawbence Sippel, B.S., M.S., D.V.M., Animal Pathologist, Head of 
the Department of Animal Diseases, and Chairman of the Division of 
Animal Diseases, Tifton, Georgia. 

Louis Ibytn Skinneb, B.S.A., Professor in Extension Service and Assistant 
Director, Agricultural Extension. 

Jesse Sidney Sloan, D.V.M., Assistant Veterinarian, Tifton, Georgia. 

♦Clabence Jay Smith. Jb., A.B., M.A., Instructor in History. 

Doba 0. Smith, B.S., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in the Demon- 
stration School. 

Doyne Muncy Smith. B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Elizabeth Anne Smith, B.A., M.S., Instructor in Libraries. 



•On leave. 
••Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE FACULTY 35 



Ebnest Bethleham Smith, B.S., M.A., Professor of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation, Head of the Department of Health and Physical Education for 
Men, and Chairman of the Division of Health and Physical Education. 

Howabd Ross Smith, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

James Aubbey Smith, Assistant Editor — Visual Education, Agricultural Ex- 
tension. 

Jennie Belle Smith, B.M., Associate Professor of Music and Supervisor of 
Music in the Demonstration School. 

Lloyd Leboy Smith, B.S.A.E., Research Associate in Agricultural Engineer- 
ing and Agricultural Engineer, U.S.D.A. 

Pebby Maxwell Smith, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant to the Coordinator, Regional 
Primary Plant Introduction Station, Experiment, Georgia. 

Richabd E. Smith, B.S.Ed., Administrative Assistant. Agricultural Extension. 

Thomas Hudson Smith, B.S., M.Ed., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Tuttle Foote Smith, B.Ph., Lieutenant Colonel, U.S.A., Assistant Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics. 

Vivian Mabguebite Smith, B.M., Instructor and Order Librarian. 

Maby Ella Lunday Soule, A.B., M.A., Professor of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation and Head of the Department of Health and Physical Education 
for Women. 

Bybon Lesteb Southwell, B.S.A., M.S.A.. Animal Husbandman and Head of 
the Department of Animal Husbandry, Tifton. Georgia. U.S.D.A. 

Melba Inez Spabks, B.S.H.E., District Agent, Agricultural Extension. 

Geobge Nobth Spabbow, B.S.C.E., Project Supervisor and Research Associate 
in Agricultural Engineering, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Stephen Johnson Speck, B.S., M.S., Assistant Dairyman and Acting Superin- 
tendent of the Creamery. 

Maby Speibs, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Home Economist and Head of the Department 
of Home Economics. Experiment. Georgia. 

Chables Raymond Spell, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Ibwin Vincent Spebry, A.B., M.A., Ed.D.. Professor of Family Development, 
Head of the Department of Family Development, and Chairman of the 
Division of Family Development. 

Gabth Hibam Spitleb, B.S., Assistant Entomologist, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D^A.. 

Lee Spbowles, A.B., M.A., Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education and Re- 
search Assistant in the Bureau of Education Studies and Field Services. 

Samuel Vaude Stacy, B.S., M.S.. Agronomist and Head of the Department 
of Agronomy, Experiment, Georgia. 

Edith Lanqdale Stallings, B.S., B.A., M.A., Associate Professor and Dean 
of Women. 



3G THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

William Edward Stallings, Plant Manager of the Poultry Plant and Super- 
visor of the Georgia National Egg Laying Contest. 

Hugh Smiley Stanley, A.B., A.M., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Oscae Steanson, B.S., M.S., Associate Agricultural Economist, Experiment, 
Georgia. 

♦♦Matthias Stelly, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy. 

James Louis Stephens, B.S.A., M.S. A., Senior Agronomist. Tifton, Georgia, 
U.S.D.A. 

Ralph Haygood Stephens, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor and Director of the 
University Press. 

Ronald David Stephens, B.S.A., Associate Editor — Radio, Agricultural Ex- 
tension. 

Roswell Powell Stephens, A.B., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 
and Dean Emeritus of the Graduate School. 

Edward Donald Stoddard, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Veterinary Anatomy 
and Histology. 

Anita Durand Stone. B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Physiology 
and Pharmacology. 

James Aaron Strickland, B.B.A., M.Ed., Instructor in Education. 

Lura Belle Strong, A.B., Instructor Emeritus in Health and Physical Edu- 
cation. 

Warren Murray Strong, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Hygiene. 

David Boyd Strother, A.B., M.A., Temporary Assistant Professor of Speech. 

***Henry Perkins Stuckey, B.S., Sc.D., Director Emeritus, Experiment, Geor- 
gia. 

Reynold Poy Suman, B.S., Range Conservationist, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Glenn Wallace Sutton, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Finance. 

Rachel Sibley Sutton, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Stella Caudlll Sutton, B.S., Librarian, Tifton, Georgia. 

William Aener Sutton, B.S.A., State 4-H Club Leader, Agricultural Exten- 
sion. 

Emeliza Swain, A.B., M.S.Ed., Part-time Assistant Professor of Psychology 
and Assistant Director of the Veterans Guidance Center. 

John Erwin Talmadge, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Journalism. 

William Tate, A.B., A.M., Associate Professor of English and Dean of Men. 

Jack Taylor, B.S.A., M.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist, Blairsville, Georgia. 

Richard Bonnell Taylor, A.B., B.S., Assistant Professor of Landscape Archi- 
tecture. 

••Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 
•••Died June 14. 1951. 



THE FACULTY 37 



Andrew Ezell Terry, B.Ph., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of German. 

Richard William Tews, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Health and Physi- 
cal Education. 

Ernest Henry Thomas, B.S.A., Associate Agronomist, Agricultural Exten- 
sion. 

Howard Wilbur Thomas, Professor of Art. 

John Henry Thomason, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

Clara Mildred Thompson, A.B., A.M., LL.D., Ph.D., Professor of History. 

**George Edward Thompson, B.S.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Plant Path- 
ology and Plant Breeding. 

Jack Thomas Thompson, B.S., Assistant Agronomist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Mary Jane Tingle. A.B., M.A., Assistajit Professor of Education and Assistant 
Principal of the Demonstration School. 

John Laurens Tison, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Elizabeth Todd, Ph.B., M.A., Professor of Education in Home Economics. 

Ralph Harmon Tolbert, A.B., B.S.A., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of Agri- 
cultural Education and Acting Chairman of the Division of Vocational 
Education. 

Sylvester Lloyd Toumey, B.S., First Lieutenant, USAF, Assistant Professor 
of Air Science and Tactics. 

Forrest Grady Towns, B.S.Ed., Assistant Professor of Health and Physical 
Education. 

Chester Coleman Travelstead, A.B., M.M.Ed., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Education and Research Assistant in the Bureau of Education Studies 
and Field Services. 

Kenneth Treanor, B.S.A.. Superintendent of Southeast Georgia Experiment 
Station, Midville, Georgia. 

Emel Samuel Troelston, B.S., A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

James Oliver Tucker, B.S., M.S., D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary 
Pathology and Parasitology. 

Charles Eugene Turner, B.F.A., Instructor in Agricultural Engineering and 
Illustrator, Southern Association of Agricultural Engineering and Voca- 
tional Agricultural Educators. 

♦John Hancock Turner, Jr.. B.S.A., Agronomist, Tifton, Georgia. 

Harry G. Ukkelberg, B.S.A., M.S., Associate Horticulturist, Tifton, Georgia. 

Frank Van Haltern, B.S., M.S., Associate Plant Pathologist, Experiment, 
Georgia. 



'On leave. 

►Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



38 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Mabtin Luther Van Winkle, Ph.B., B.S.A., M.S., Assistant Recreationist, 
Agricultural Extension. 

Halsey Hugh Vegobs, A.B., Parasitologist, Experiment, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

John Chalmers Vinson, A.B., M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
History. 

Laurence Henry Walker, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Part-time Acting Professor of Eco- 
nomics. 

Lester Carl Walker, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Temporary Assistant Professor 
of Art. 

Marion Skinner Walker, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Assistant Professor of Housing 
and Household Equipment. 

Roosevelt Pruyn Walker, A.B., M.A., Professor of English. 

Charles Augustus Wall, Jr., Ph.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Frances Louise Wallis, A.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

John Couse Walters, Scientific Aid, Tifton, Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Tommy Laurice Walton, Jr.. B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Agri- 
cultural Extension. 

Antonio Johnston Waring, Jr., B.A., M.D., Research Associate in Anthro- 
pology and Archaeology. 

Byron Hilbun Warner, B.S., Associate Professor of Music. 

**Edward Perrin Warren, B.S.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Animal 
Husbandry. 

Kenneth Lee Waters, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy and Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Luke Stephens Watson, B.S.A., District Agent, Agricultural Extension. 

Donald James Weddell, B.S.F., M.S., Professor of Forestry and Dean of the 
School of Forestry. 

♦Ralph Lee Wehunt, B.S.A., M.S.A., Research Assistant Agronomist. 

James Leroy Weimer, A.B., Ph.D., Senior Plant Pathologist, Experiment, 
Georgia, U.S.D.A. 

Branson Edwin Welbobn, B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Agri- 
cultural Extension. 

Harmon Keener Welch, Jr., B.S.A., Assistant Dairyman, Agricultural Exten- 
sion. 

Harold George Wescott, B.E., M.A., Associate Professor of Art. 

Henry Haynes West, B.S., LL.B., Lecturer in Law. 

Robert Hunter West, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Edison Collins Westbrook, B.S.A., M.S.A., Agronomist, Agricultural Exten- 



"*A1ro on College Experiment Station Staff. 
♦On leave. 



THE FACULTY 39 



Lloyd Claxboubne Westbbook, B.S.A., District Agent, Agricultural Exten- 
sion. 

Clifford Westerfield, B.S., M.S.A., D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Anatomy 
and Histology and Head of the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and 
Histology. 

Jonathan Jackson Westfall, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Botany and Head 
of the Department of Botany. 

James William Whatley, B.S., Assistant Professor of Health and Physical 
Education. 

Mary Lou Whatley, B.S., Assistant Home Economist, Experiment, Georgia, 

Lee Roy Wheeler, Agricultural Aid, Tifton, Georgia, U.8.D.A. 

♦♦Robert Stevenson Wheeler, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry, 
Head of the Department of Poultry Husbandry, and Chairman of the 
Poultry Division. 

♦♦Harold Douglas White, B.S.A.E., M.S.A.E., Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

Harry Alton White, B.S., M.S., Cooperative Agent — Farm Management, Ag- 
ricultural Extension, U.8.D.A. 

♦Thomas Hillyer Whitehead, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Brooks Edward Wigginton, A.B., B.F.A., M.L.A., F.A.A.R., Professor of Land- 
scape Architecture. 

Cecil Norton Wilder, B.S.A., M.S.A., Associate Professor of Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

Barnett Osborn Williams, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Head 
of the Department of Sociology. 

John Dowell Williams, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish. 

Joseph Anderson Williams, A.B., M.S., M.Ed., D.Ed., Professor of Education 
and Assistant to the President. 

Ralph Otto Williams, B.S., Assistant Animal Husbandman, Agricultural 
Extension, Tifton, Georgia. 

Thomas Griffith Williams, Jr., B.F.A., Assistant Landscape Architect, Ag- 
ricultural Extension. 

Charles Micaijah Williamson, B.F.A., M.F.A., Instructor in Education, 
Critic Teacher in Art Education in the Demonstration School, and Visit- 
ing Teacher, Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service. 

Violet Marlowe Williamson, B.S.H.E., Part-time Instructor in Education 
in Home Economics. 

Charles Christopher Wilson, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bot- 
any. 



*On leave. 
♦•Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



40 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Robert Gumming Wilson, Ph.G., Dean Emeritus of the School of Pharmacy. 
♦Howard Henry Woeber, B.S., M.S., Associate Chemist, Experiment, Georgia. 

Annie Virgil Womack, B.F.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Modern Foreign 
Languages. 

Otis Woodard, B.S.A., Horticulturist and Head of the Department of Horti- 
culture, Tifton, Georgia. 

Jasper Guy Woodroof, B.S.A., M.S. A., Ph.D., Food Technologist, Head of the 
Department of Food Technology, and Chairman of the Division of Food 
Technology, Experiment, Georgia. 

William Davis Woodward, B.S.A., M.S. A., Assistant Horticulturist, Tifton. 
Georgia. 

♦Albert Cadwallader Worrell, B.S.F., M.S., Assistant Professor of Forest 
Mensuration. 

James Emmett Yearty, First Lieutenant, USAF, Assistant Professor of Air 
Science and Tactics. 

Florene Young, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Acting Head 
of the Department of Psychology. 

Howard B. Young, B.S.A., Part-time Acting Assistant Superintendent of the 
Creamery. 

Bratislav Zak, B.S., Research Associate in Forest Pathology and U.S.D.A. 
Junior Pathologist. 

May Zeigler, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Wilbur Zelinsky, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Geography and Geology. 

Ann Elizabeth Zellner, B.S.H.E., Assistant State !f-H Club header, Agricul- 
tural Extension. 

John Jacob Zimmerman, Ph.B., M.A., Instructor and Bibliographer, Libraries. 



*(>n leave. 



LIBRARY STAFF 



William Porter Kellam, Director of Libraries. 
Evelyn Mae Fritz, Associate Director. 
Irene Noell, Assistant to the Director. 



John Wyatt Bonner, Jr., Head of the Acquisitions Division. 

Vivian Branch, Reference Librarian. 

Kathleen Drake Broadhurst, Education Librarian. 

Gertrude Ellington Cantrell, Cataloguer. 

Wymberly Wormsloe DeRenne. Archivist. 

William Land Duncan, Cataloguer. 

Louise Lesly Fant, Head of the Documents Division. 

Dorothy Louise Harmer, Head of the Catalogue Division. 

Allie Carroll Hart, Cataloguer. 

Louise Hollingsworth, Fine Arts Librarian. 

Catherine Frances Jackson, Cataloguer. 

Elizabeth LaBoone, Head of the Public Service Division. 

Sarah Bailey Lamar, Coordinate Campus Librarian. 

Helen Virginia Michaelis, South Branch Librarian. 

Charlotte Newton, Cataloguer. 

Jane Oliver, Law Librarian. 

Hazel Philbrick, Reserve Book Librarian. 

William Carter Pollard, Business Administration Librarian. 

Elizabeth Riley, Gift and Exchange Librarian. 

Elizabeth Anne Smith, Cataloguer. 

Vivian Marguerite Smith, Order Librarian. 

John Jacob Zimmerman, Bibliographer, Libraries. 

ASSISTANTSHTPS 

Donald Elmer Barnett, English. 

Roy Beaty, Jr., Education. 

Stephen Joshua Branen, Agricultural Economics. 

Robert Kent Butz, Mathematics. 

Jimmie Harris Bridges, Animal Husbandry. 

William Randolph Brown, Education. 

Bobbie June Cavender, Education. 

John Constable, Jr., Journalism. 

Leonard Anthony DeLonga, Art. 

James Walter Dobson. Agronomy. 

[ 41 ] 



42 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Mary Catherine Dunn, Biology. 

Robert B. Flanders, Chemistry. 

Phyllis Lucile Grandy, Music. 

John Milward Griner, Animal Husbandly. 

Bradford Frank Hadnot, Mathematics. 

Robert Anderson Hight, Jr., Mathematics. 

Alfred Thomas Hind, Jr., Mathematics. 

Bill Maurice Jones, Chemistry. 

Robert Lee Kenney, Chemistry. 

Mary Frances Kramer, Home Economics. 

Edward Julian Kuenzler, Biology. 

Earnest Cosby Land, Psychology. 

Malcolm Dallis Lockhart, Education. 

Joyce B. Lorentzson, English. 

Terry Allen McGowan, Biology. 

Everett Sllvey McKibben, Art. 

Eugene Joseph McLaughlin, Business Administration. 

Finley Aloysius McLaurin, Political Science. 

Arthur Riley Macon, Chemistry. 

James Calder Major, Biology. 

Harold David Meltzer, Biology. 

Morris Layfayette Miller, Jr., Forestry. 

James Owen Moore, Modern Foreign Language. 

Alvin Franklin Moreland, Education. 

Alberta Loyd Newbanks. Home Economics. 

Tyre Alexander Newton, Mathematics. 

Oscar Shelby Neyi.ans. Biology. 

Jeanne Lee Nichols, English. 

Dan Edwin Pratt. Food Technology. 

Vincent Nils Schroder, Botany. 

Katherine Sciple, English. 

Fred Harrison Smith, Plant Pathology. 

William Hux Spell, Chemistry. 

Anthony Henderson Thompson, Psychology. 

Edward Paul Torrey. Geography. 

David Tutherly Walker, Mathematics. 

James Graham Wall, Mathematics. 

Mary LaNelle Wardlow. Education. 

Harold Mn/roN Windlan, Dairy. 

Rolf Sidney Woolan, Mathematics. 

Bevan K. Youse, Mathematics. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

THE UNIVERSITY 

HISTORY 

The University of Georgia was incorporated by an Act of the General 
Assembly on January 27, 1785. In the preceding year the General Assembly 
had set aside 40,000 acres of land to endow a college or seminary of learn- 
ing. Georgia was the first state to provide for the establishment of a state- 
supported university. 

The first meeting of the Board of Trustees was held in Augusta on Febru- 
ary 13, 1786. At this meeting the Trustees selected Abraham Baldwin as 
president of the University. Baldwin, a native of Connecticut and a gradu- 
ate of Yale University, had come to Georgia in 1784. It was he who drafted 
the charter adopted by the General Assembly. 

The University was not actually established until 1801. In that year a 
committee of the Board of Trustees selected a site for the new institution. 
John Milledge, later a governor of the state, purchased the site chosen — a 
tract of 633 acres on the banks of the Oconee River in Northeast Georgia 
— and gave it to the Board of Trustees. In the fall of 1801 Josiah Meigs 
was named president of the University and work was begun on the first 
building. This building, originally called Franklin College in honor of 
Benjamin Franklin, is still standing and is now known as Old College. The 
University opened its doors to students in 1801 and graduated its first 
class in 1804. 

During the early part of the nineteenth century the curriculum of the 
University of Georgia — or of Franklin College as it was then frequently 
called — embraced only courses in traditional classical studies. In 1843 the 
scope of the work of the institution was broadened by the offering of courses 
in law. The activities of the University were broadened still further in 
1872 when the institution was designated to receive Federal funds provided 
for instruction in agriculture and the mechanical arts. 

After the turn of the century the activities of the University expanded 
rapidly to meet the demands for various types of professional and technical 
training. The teaching and research work of the University is now carried 
on by eleven colleges and schools and by two divisions that are integral parts 
of the University. These colleges and schools and the dates of their estab- 
lishment as separate administrative units are as follows: College of Arts 
and Sciences, 1801; School of Law, 1859; School of Pharmacy, 1903; College 
of Agriculture, 1906; School of Forestry, 1906; College of Education, 1908; 
Graduate School, 1910; College of Business Administration, 1912; School of 
Journalism, 1915; School of Home Economics, 1933; School of Veterinary 
Medicine, 1946. The Atlanta Division and the Division of General Extension 
were incorporated into the University July 1, 1947. 

In 1931 the General Assembly of Georgia placed all publicly supported 
schools and colleges, including the University of Georgia, under the jurisdic- 

V - [43] 



44 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

tion of a single board. The organization set up by the Act of 1931 is known 
as the University System of Georgia and the governing board of the System 
is called the Board of Regents. The executive officer of the Board of Regents, 
known as the Chancellor, exercises a general supervisory control over all 
institutions of the University System. Each one of the institutions com- 
prising the University System has its own executive officers and faculty. 

ATLANTA DIVISION 

By action of the Board of Regents the former University System of Georgia 
Center in Atlanta was integrated with the University on July 1, 1947. This 
Center had operated as a separate unit in the University System since 1932. 
The courses are scheduled for hours that will accommodate residents of 
the Atlanta metropolitan area who are employed full or part-time. The pro- 
gram is planned to serve four purposes: (1) a two-year junior college curricu- 
lum with residence credit; (2) a four-year curriculum leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Business Administration; (3) extension courses to enable 
a student to complete the equivalent of a third year of work; and (4) exten- 
sion courses to meet the needs of adults for professional or cultural improve- 
ment. 

Admission requirements, degree requirements, fees, and general policies 
are the same for both the Atlanta Division and the University in Athens. 
Course offerings and general information concerning the Atlanta Division 
are contained in the bulletin published by that Division. Communications 
regarding the courses or admission should be addressed to the Atlanta 
Division, University of Georgia, 24 Ivy Street, S. E. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The first buildings of the University were constructed in the primeval 
forest of North Georgia, far distant from any town of consequence. About 
the University community the town of Athens grew up. Although Athens 
i» now one of the larger and more important cities of the state, it retains 
much of the beauty and charm of the Old South. 

The North Campus of the University lies in the very heart of Athens. 
On this campus are located buildings that house the College of Arts and 
Sciences, the School of Law, the School of Pharmacy, the College of Educa- 
tion, the College of Business Administration, and the School of Journalism. 
Here also are a dining hall and five dormitories for men students. Thirty- 
two principal buildings are located on this campus. Among these buildings 
are Old College (1801), New College (1832), Demosthenian Hall (1824), the 
University Chapel (1832), and Phi Kappa Hall (1834). 

Surrounding the Landscape Architecture Building is the Ladies' Garden 
Club Founders Memorial Garden, consisting of a series of formal and natu- 
ralistic developments. 

On the South Campus, which is separated from the North Campus by 
a wooded ravine, are situated the buildings that house the College of Agri- 
culture, the School of Forestry, the School of Home Economics, and the 
School of Veterinary Medicine. One portion of this campus is set aside for 



GENERAL INFORMATION 45_ 

buildings that are used by junior and senior women students. There are 
twenty-two major buildings on the South Campus. 

Dormitories and classroom buildings for freshman and sophomore women 
are located on a campus (Coordinate Campus) that lies on the west side of 
Athens about two miles from the North Campus of the University. This cam- 
pus, which was the home of the old Georgia State Teachers' College, has ten 
principal buildings. 

The University also utilizes as a dormitory for junior and senior women 
the historic antebellum structure once used by the Lucy Cobb Institute. 

The campuses of the University and the adjacent lands used by the Col- 
lege of Agriculture and the School of Forestry embrace approximately 3,500 
acres. 

LIBRARIES 

On May 31, 1951 the Libraries of the University contained 269,029 catalogued 
volumes besides many uncatalogued manuscripts, maps, and pamphlets. Ma- 
terial is being constantly added in the support of current teaching and re- 
search. During recent years grants from educational foundations and special 
allocations of funds have contributed to the general strengthening of the col- 
lections and to the expansion of resources for graduate study. 

The collections of particular value are the famous DeRenne Library of 
Georgia and southern historical material, containing the original Consti- 
tution of the Confederate States; the Moore collection of southern history; 
some early Georgia colonial manuscripts which were once the property of 
the Earl of Egmont, first president of the Trustees of the Georgia Colony; 
and the mathematical collection which, as the result of acquiring the 13,000- 
volume library of the American Mathematical Society in 1951, is one of the 
best in the country. 

The University Libraries serve as a depository for publications of the 
United States government and maps issued by the Army Map Service. The 
document collection has been augmented by acquisition of many publications 
of the states and by the publications of the League of Nations and of the 
United Nations. 

Current subscriptions are maintained for more than 2,100 periodicals and 
newspapers. Many of the publications of the important universities and 
scholarly societies are also received. 

In addition to the facilities of the General Library, special services are 
provided for the Colleges of Agriculture and Business Administration, the 
Schools of Forestry, Home Economics, Law, and Veterinary Medicine, and 
the Division of Fine Arts. The Alexander C. King Law Library is located 
on the second floor of Hirsch Hall and contains approximately 28,000 well- 
selected volumes. The branch on South Campus houses some 28,000 volumes, 
and serves the various teaching departments on that campus. 

The Business Administration Library is housed in the Commerce-Jour- 
nalism building and serves the students and faculty of the College of Busi- 
ness Administration. A specialized collection is maintained for the use of 



46 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

the Division of Fine Arts. The library on Coordinate Campus contains a 
collection of books fitted especially to the needs of that campus. 

The Schools of Journalism and Pharmacy, the Division of Biological 
Sciences, and the Department of Chemistry have collections of books and 
journals for use by their faculties and graduate students. A map collection 
is housed in the Department of Geography and Geology. 

The resources of all branches are catalogued in the General Library and 
the resources of all units are available on equal terms to the students and 
faculties of all colleges and schools. Located in the General Library is a 
union catalogue of all books in the major libraries of Atlanta, Inter-library 
loan services are possible with these libraries as well as with many others 
throughout the country. 

Rules and regulations governing the use of books are designed to achieve 
the greatest usefulness of the collections to the University community. The 
stacks are open to all members of the faculty and to students engaged in ad- 
vanced work. Most books, except reference works, periodicals, and material 
used in class assignments, are lent for two weeks. 

Books and pamphlets which are used as collateral reading are located in 
the Reserve Library, the South Campus Branch, the Coordinate Library, 
and the Business Administration Library. These titles are usually restricted 
to use in the buildings and to overnight loans in order that all students may 
have ample opportunity to use them. 

The main library is open from 8:00 A. M. to 9:45 P. M. Monday through 
Friday, and from 8:00 A. M. to 6:00 P. M. on Saturday. The hours of the 
Reserve Book Room are 7:45 A. M. to 9:45 P. M. Monday through Friday, 
7:45 A. M. to 6:00 P. M. on Saturday, and 2:00 P. M. to 9:00 P. M. on Sun- 
day. While the hours of the branch libraries vary to meet the particular 
needs of the clientele, they are open approximately the same total time, ade- 
quately providing for examination and use of material not available for use 
outside the building. 

LABORATORIES 

The Departments of Bacteriology, Botany, Chemistry, Physics, Plant 
Pathology, Psychology, and Zoology have laboratories that are well equipped 
for instruction and original research. There are several private laboratories 
for the use of professors and advanced graduate students. The School of 
Pharmacy, the College of Agriculture, the School of Forestry, the School of 
Home Economics, and the School of Veterinary Medicine have extensive 
laboratory facilities for the use of their students and faculties in their work 
in the fields of applied science. The College of Business Administration has 
recently acquired many business machines of the latest type for use in courses 
in accounting and business procedures. The School of Journalism maintains 
a press room and radio studio as a means of offering practical training to 
its students. 

THE COLLEGE YEAR 

The college year is divided into four quarters of approximately eleven 
weeks each. The fall quarter begins the latter part of September and ends 
at the Christmas holidays. The winter quarter begins during the first week 



GENERAL INFORMATION 47 

in January and extends to the middle of March. The spring quarter begins 
in March and ends in the early part of June. The summer quarter begins 
in June and closes in the latter part of August. The exact dates on which 
quarters begin and end will be found in the University Calendar. 

New courses are begun each quarter. It is possible, therefore, for students 
to enter the University at the beginning of any quarter. 

Degrees are conferred at the close of the spring quarter in June and 
at the close of the summer quarter in August. Students completing their 
work in December or March will, on their request, be given a certificate 
to the effect that all degree requirements have been satisfied. Such students 
receive their diploma in June following the completion of their work. 

ADMISSION TO COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 
OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Men and women who are at least sixteen years of age and of good moral 
character are eligible to apply for admission to the undergraduate schools 
and colleges of the University. Admission may be obtained in any one of 
four ways: 

1. By presenting a certificate of graduation from an accredited high 
school. 

2. By passing entrance examinations, provided the applicant has not 
been in an accredited high school the previous year. 

3. By qualifying as an adult special student. 

4. By submitting evidence of studies successfully pursued at another 
college or university. The University of Georgia accepts only those students 
who can furnish an honorable dismissal from the college previously attended. 

Students who plan to enter the University on the basis of high school 
or college transcripts should ask that official credentials be sent directly 
from the institution previously attended to the Director of Admissions at 
the University soon after the close of the school year in June. The Director 
of Admissions will communicate with the applicant regarding his admis- 
sion. If the credentials are not received until the week before the opening 
of the University, it may not be possible for the Director of Admissions 
to notify the applicant of his status before his arrival on the campus. 

Although students may enter at the beginning of any one of the four 
quarters of the academic year, they will find it to their advantage to enter 
in September. 

BY CERTIFICATE 

To be admitted by certificate an applicant must be a graduate of an 
accredited secondary school. The certificate should be made on an official 
blank that is supplied by the University and it should be signed by the 
superintendent or principal. If the applicant is a graduate of a four-year 
high school, he must show that he has completed at least fifteen units of 
acceptable secondary school work. If the applicant is a graduate of a 
three-year senior high school, he must present not less than fifteen units 



48 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

and must show that at least twelve of those units of work were taken in 
the senior high school and not more than three were completed in the 
junior high school. 1 

A unit course of study in secondary school is a course covering an 
academic year and including not less than the equivalent of 120 class 
periods of sixty minutes each. Two hours of work requiring little or no 
preparation outside the class are considered as equivalent to one hour of 
prepared classroom work. 

The fifteen units of secondary school work that an applicant presents for 
admission to the University must include the following: 

1. English 2 3 units 

2. Social Studies (history, civics, economics, sociology) 2 units 

3. Mathematics (one unit must be algebra) 3 2 units 

4. Science (biological or physical) 1 unit 

5. Four units from English, social studies, mathematics, science, 

or foreign language 4 4 units 

6. Three units that may be selected from any subjects which are 
accepted by an accredited high school toward its diploma and 
which meet standards of accrediting agencies 5 3 units 

Certificates will not be accepted for less than one year's attendance in 
the school issuing the certificate. Fractional credits of a value of less than 
one-half unit will not be accepted. Not less than one unit of work will be 
accepted in a foreign language. 

For purposes of admission of students by certificate, the University recog- 
nizes the following classes of schools as being fully accredited: 

1. Schools accredited by the High School Commission of Georgia. 

2. Schools accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Sec- 
ondary Schools. 



1 The transcript of credits certified by the senior high school must show any credit 
accepted from the junior high school. 

2 English — Any student whose high school preparation in English Composition is in- 
adequate may be required to take a non-credit course. 

3 Mathematics — It is recommended that the units in mathematics include one in plane 
geometry. For those students who expect to become candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, or Bachelar of Science in Agri- 
cultural Engineering, one unit of plane geometry is essential. Students who expect to 
take Agricultural Engineering must offer three units of mathematics, consisting of 
algebra or trigonometry, or both, 2 units, and plane geometry, 1 unit. Solid geometry 
also is strongly recommended. 

* Foreign Language — Although foreign language is not definitely required for admis- 
sion, it is advisable for a student to present at least two units of a foreign language 
if he expects to become a candidate for a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, 
the School of Law, the School of Pharmacy, the School of Journalism, or if he in- 
tends to register for the pre-medical course. If a student plans to become a candi- 
date for the Bachelor of Arts degree, he should present at least two units of Latin. 
A student who plans to register for the combined curriculum in science and medicine 
leading to the B.S. and M.D. degrees will find it difficult to meet the requirements 
in one year of residence unless he submits two units of foreign language from high 
school. 

One unit in a foreign language taken in high school cannot be credited towards the 
combined high school and college requirements for any degree unless it is followed in 
college by at least one course in the same language. College credit will not be given 
for a language course previously completed in high school. 

5 The University recognizes the obligations of high schools to serve the needs of all 
their students. It believes, therefore, that high schools should offer courses in such 
fields as art, commerce, home economics, industrial arts, and music. The University 
accepts these courses as a partial satisfaction of its admission requirements because 
it regards them as studies that tend to prepare students for college work. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 49 

3. Schools accredited by other recognized accrediting agencies or by other 
state or regional associations of colleges and secondary schools. 

The University reserves the right to reject any applicant whose low record 
indicates that he is not adequately prepared to do college work even though 
he may meet the entrance requirements set forth above. 

BY EXAMINATION 

Applicants for admission who do not present acceptable certificates from 
secondary schools may be admitted to the University upon passing entrance 
examinations in the number and kinds of units as specified in the preceding 
section. It is the general policy of the University, however, not to admit 
to entrance examinations applicants who have been in an accredited high 
school the previous year. 

Examinations are held at the University and may be taken at anytime. 
It is preferable for prospective entrants to present themselves for examina- 
tion in June. 

These admission examinations are also open to graduates of accredited 
high schools who may be deficient in certain subjects and who, therefore, 
are unable to take full advantage of the certificate plan of admission. 

A student who plans to take the entrance examinations should send to 
the Director of Admissions a statement of his academic training and experi- 
ence. The Director will notify the applicant of the exact date of the exam- 
inations and of the scope and character of the examination that he must 
take. 

AS SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Persons over twenty-one years of age may be admitted as special students 
in the undergraduate colleges of the University, provided they secure the 
recommendation of the instructor whose work they wish to take and the 
approval of the dean of the college concerned. They must give evidence 
that they possess the requisite knowledge and ability to pursue profitably 
their chosen subjects and they must meet any special requirements that 
may be prescribed by the college in which they wish to enroll. 

A person registered as a special student in one college and desiring to 
take a course in another college of the University must obtain the approval 
of the dean of the latter college. 

A special student is not eligible to take part in student extracurricular 
activities or to be initiated into a fraternity or sorority. 

No one may enroll as a special student in any school or college of the 
University for more than two years. Before beginning his third year, a 
student admitted on an adult basis must have fully satisfied all entrance 
requirements. When all entrance requirements have been thus met, a stu- 
dent may continue work in the University, will receive regular classification, 
and may be accepted as a candidate for a degree. 



50 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

IRREGULAR STUDENTS 

The policy of the University is not to allow students who can meet the 
entrance requirements (especially those under 21 years of age) to take 
irregular programs of work. In particular the University does not offer 
two-year terminal programs in vocational or professional work; all curricula 
are organized on a 12- or 13-quarter basis except in graduate programs, law, 
and nursing education. However, the first six quarters of all undergraduate 
curricula are designed, as far as practicable, to give the student who drops 
out after that time an educational program of value. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

Students from accredited colleges and universities who have pursued 
college courses equivalent to those of the University of Georgia and who 
have made satisfactory records and been granted honorable dismissal from 
their former institutions may be admitted to the University. Former stu- 
dents of such institutions cannot be received as freshmen on the basis of their 
high school records. 

Applicants for admission who have had any work in another institution, 
regardless of whether or not they wish credit for it, must submit complete 
credentials of both their high school and college work to the Director of 
Admissions. 

The amount of credit that the University will allow for work done in 
another institution within a given period of time will not exceed the normal 
amount of credit that could have been earned at the University during that 
time. A maximum of 96 academic quarter hours from a junior college may 
be applied toward a degree. 

At least ninety per cent of the hours earned must carry grades above the 
lowest passing grade at that institution. Credit for courses with the lowest 
passing grades may be given upon successful completion of a validating 
examination taken under University regulations. Application to take these 
examinations should be made to the Registrar. 

Since the University requires that at least the work of the senior year 
be taken in residence, students may not receive credit toward a degree for 
more than three years of work in another institution. 

A student who has been dropped from another institution because of 
poor scholarship or for disciplinary reasons may not enter the University 
the following quarter. Such student will not be admitted to the University 
until he is eligible to return to the institution from which he was dismissed 
and has been removed from probation. 

Credit for work done outside the University is given only when the 
work has been done at institutions approved by the Director of Admissions 
and the Committee on Admissions. Such institutions are divided by the 
committee into two groups: (1) institutions approved for credit on tran- 
script of record; (2) institutions approved for credit based on the validation 
of the transcript record by formal examinations. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 51 

Correspondence with reference to advanced standing should be addresssed 
to the Director of Admissions or to the dean of the college or school in which 
the prospective student wishes to register. 

EXEMPTIONS FROM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR 
TRANSFER STUDENTS 

The first two years of a number of University curricula include general 
courses: History 110 x-y, History of Western Civilization; English 22 x-y, 
Survey of European Literature; Mathematics 101 x-y, Algebra and Trigo- 
nometry; Physical Science 1, Survey of Elementary Astronomy and Physics; 
and Human Biology 1-2. 

Students who transfer with less than junior standing and without credit 
for these general courses will be required to take them here if they are 
requirements for the degree for which they are working, but if they have 
credit for courses of equal value in the same fields they may be exempted 
from the courses. 

Id the case of students who transfer with junior standing from standard 
colleges without these general courses, provisions are made for substitu- 
tions of courses in the same fields. 

Students who transfer to the University with junior standing are exempt 
from the requirement of Military Science 1-2 or Air Science 5-6, and Physical 
Education 1-2 (for men and women). 

The junior-senior courses are arranged so that a student who has com- 
pleted the freshman and sophomore years at a standard institution with 
satisfactory grades can complete the degree requirements, for all except the 
more technical degrees, in six quarters. 

In some degrees certain modifications are made in required courses for 
transfer students. For these modifications see Degree Requirements. 

TO THE GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 

The foregoing regulations regarding admission of students are applicable 
to all schools and colleges of the University. Additional regulations apply to 
the Graduate School, the School of Law, and the School of Veterinary Medi- 
cine. The admission requirements of these schools are set forth in the sec- 
tions of this catalogue devoted to them. 

REGISTRATION AND PENALTIES FOR LATE REGISTRATION 

A student who fails to register on the days set aside for that purpose will 
be subject to the following penalties: For the first day beyond the scheduled 
dates, $5 and for each succeeding day up to and including the fourth day, 
$2; or a total of $11. 

No student will be admitted after the expiration of the fourth day beyond 
the scheduled registration days. 

An applicant for admission whose credentials have been passed upon 
favorably by the Director of Admissions should present himself at the 
Registrar's office. The applicant will receive from the Registrar a state- 



52 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ment showing the procedure for registration. A student will not be per- 
mitted to attend classes in a course for which he is not registered. 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

All new students (freshmen and transfers) with the exception of those 
entering only for summer sessions, must have physical examinations by their 
family physician during the two months before registration. The physical 
examination blanks, obtainable at the Infirmary or Registrar's Office, should 
be mailed to the Gilbert Memorial Infirmary before registration or delivered 
in person at the time of registration. Physical examinations will not be 
given at the University during registration. 

All students will be required to have chest X-rays which are free of charge, 
made during the Fall Quarter at the appointed time. 

FRESHMAN REGISTRATION 

The opening week of the fall quarter registration period in September is 
called "Freshman Week." It is an orientation period, designed to introduce 
freshmen to the University. This period will be devoted to physical exami- 
nations, aptitude tests, lectures and chapel exercises, conferences with ad- 
visers, and registration. 

Since freshmen must attend all exercises held during the week set aside 
for them, it is desirable that all details incident to admission be attended 
to as early as possible. Students who graduate from high school and who 
plan to come to the University should notify their principals of their inten- 
tion and ask that the necessary certificates be prepared and sent to the 
Director of Admissions. 

Students who desire to live in a University dormitory should write to 
the Director of Men's Housing or the Director of Women's Housing. 

CLASSES FOR FRESHMEN WOMEN 

Classes for all freshman women and certain sophomore women will be 
scheduled on the West (Coordinate) Campus because they will be assigned 
dormitory space on that campus. Upon completion of the new dormitory on 
the South Campus classes will be scheduled on that campus or the adjacent 
North Campus. In each dormitory there is a resident house director. 

FIELDS OF INSTRUCTIONAL WORK 
OF THE UNIVERSITY 

DEGREES OFFERED BY COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 
OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The University offers courses of instruction leading to the following 
degrees: 

1. In the Graduate School the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Arts 
in Journalism, Master of Science, Master of Science in Agriculture, Master 
of Science in Agricultural Engineering, Master of Science in Business Ad- 
ministration, Master of Science in Chemistry, Master of Science in Educa- 
tion, Master of Science in Forestry, Master of Science in Home Economics, 



GENERAL INFORMATION 53 

Master of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Agriculture, Master of Business 
Administration, Master of Education, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Fores- 
try, Master of Home Economics, Master of Laws, Master of Music Education, 
Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy (in Mathematics and in 
Zoology). 

2. In the College of Arts and Sciences, the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Chemis- 
try, and Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education. 

3. In the School of Law, the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

4. In the School of Pharmacy, the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy. 

5. In the College of Agriculture, the degrees of Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture, Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering, Bachelor of 
Science in Landscape Architecture, and Bachelor of Landscape Architecture. 

6. In the School of Forestry, the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry. 

7. In the School of Education, the degree of Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation. 

8. In the College of Business Administration, the degree of Bachelor of 
Business Administration. 

9. In the School of Journalism, the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Jour- 
nalism. 

10. In the School of Home Economics, the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Home Economics. 

11. In the School of Veterinary Medicine, the degree of Doctor of Veteri- 
nary Medicine. 

A graduate of any course may receive the baccalaureate degree of any 
other course by completing the additional studies required in that course 
and by meeting residence requirements for the second baccalaureate degree. 
Two baccalaureate degrees cannot be awarded in the same year. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMED SERVICES 

There are Army and Air Force units of the Senior Division, Reserve Offi- 
cers' Training Corps at the University. The Army Unit consists of Armor 
and Infantry; the Air Force Unit consists of Comptrollership, Administra- 
tion and Logistics, and Flight Operations. The Army and Air Units con- 
stitute a regular department of instruction within the University known 
as the Department of the Armed Services. All training in this department 
is conducted in accordance with directions and programs promulgated by 
the Department of the Army and the Department of the Air Force. Under 
the post-war program, the Commanding General, Army Ground Forces, 
through appropriate Army Commanders, and the Commanding General, Con- 
tinental Air Command, through appropriate Air Force Commanders, are 
charged with necessary action to carry out Department of the Army and 
Department of the Air Force policies as pertain to their respective ROTC 
units. 



54 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The staff of the Department of the Armed Services consists of the Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and Tactics, Professor of Air Science and Tactics, 
other assigned officers of the Army and Department of the Air Force, and 
non-commissioned officers and airmen who perform administrative, mainte- 
nance, and assistant instructor duties. 

The mission of the Senior Division ROTC is to produce junior officers who 
have the qualities and attributes essential to their progressive and continued 
development as officers in the Army and Air Force of the United States. 

Training is divided into two parts, First and Second Basic Courses and 
First and Second Advanced Courses. For First Year Basic in the Army 
Unit, the training is branch immaterial, that is, all the subjects are com- 
mon to both Infantry and Armor. However, in the Second Basic and Ad- 
vanced courses a large part of the subjects is peculiar to the branch unit. 

All men students who are citizens of the United States and have not 
reached junior class status and are not exempted for physical or other 
reasons must take the basic courses in Military or Air Science unless proof is 
submitted of completion of basic training in one of the armed services and 
honorable discharge therefrom. In such case the veteran who has had one 
year or more of active service in World War II in the Army, Navy, Air Force, 
Marine Corps, or Coast Guard is, if otherwise qualified, eligible to enroll in 
the advanced course. Students who have had previous military service or 
training will receive such credit toward completion of the basic course as the 
Professor of Military or Air Science and Tactics and designated University 
officials may determine as authorized by current University regulations. 
Once entered, the basic courses, Military Science 1 and 2 or Air Science 5 
and 6, must be continued until completed or until standing as a junior is 
obtained at the end of the school year. Students contracting to pursue the 
advanced courses must complete such course as a requirement for gradua- 
tion unless excused by proper authority. 

Women students are invited and encouraged to enroll in Air Force courses 
at either the basic or advanced level. Although formal Air Force recog- 
nition is not at the present time authorized, women completing advanced 
courses receive 3 credit hours quarterly as an elective credit towards a de- 
gree. 

Under the provisions of the Universal Military Training and Service Act, 
Public Law 51, 82nd Congress, opportunities for deferment from induction 
into service are afforded outstanding students enrolled in First Y'ear Basic 
Air ROTC or Army ROTC. The purpose of this deferment is to enable stu- 
dents to complete their college education and to complete both the basic 
and advanced ROTC training program thus culminating in a Reserve Com- 
mission in either the Army or the Air Force. Students who decline, after 
consultation with appropriate ROTC and University officials, to fulfill the 
terms of their ROTC deferment agreements pertaining to undergraduate 
work at the Institution will be permanently dismissed immediately. 

During December of each academic year a board, composed of members 
of the Department of Armed Services and the University Faculty, is con- 
vened and recommends approximately 80% of the First Year Basic stii- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 55 

dents for deferment. This deferment remains in effect as long as the stu- 
dent is enrolled in ROTC, either basic or advanced, and maintains high aca- 
demic standards. 

For statements about fees, uniforms and textbooks see pp. 7S-79. 

SUBSISTENCE ALLOWANCE 

Students contracting to pursue the advanced courses are paid a monthly 
monetary allowance in lieu of subsistence at a daily rate equal to the value 
of the commuted ration, which for the fiscal year 1952 is 90 per day. 

SUMMER CAMP 

Students contracting to pursue the advanced courses are required to at- 
tend ROTC summer camp, normally between the two academic years of the 
advanced courses. Students attending this camp are messed and quartered, 
paid at the rate of a soldier or airman of the 1st grade, and given a travel 
allowance of 5c per mile from institution to camp and return. 



ARMY COURSE 

1 a-b-c. Military Science and Tactics. First year basic course in Armor 
and Infantry consists of three hours of classwork and two hours of drill and 
outdoor instructions per week. The course includes leadership, drill, and 
exercise of command; military policy of the United States National Defense 
Act, and ROTC; evolution of warfare; individual weapons and marksman- 
ship; military problems of the United States; military organization; maps 
and aerial photographs; and first aid and hygiene. 

2 a-b-c. Military Science and Tactics. Second year basic course in Armor 
and Infantry consists of three hours of classroom work and two hours drill 
and outdoor instruction per week. The course includes leadership, drill, and 
exercise of command; and tactics and techniques as pertain to each particu- 
lar branch. 

350 a-b-c. Military Science and Tactics. The first year advanced course 
in Armor and Infantry consists of four hours classroom work and two hours 
drill and outdoor instruction per week. The course includes leadership, drill 
and exercise of command; and tactics and techniques as pertain to each par- 
ticular branch. 

351 a-b-c. Military Science and Tactics. The second year advanced 
course in Armor and Infantry consists of four hours classroom work and 
two hours drill and outdoor instruction per week. The course includes lead- 
ership, drill and exercise of command; military administration; geographi- 
cal foundations of National Power; military teaching methods; military 
law and boards; psychological warfare; and tactics and techniques as per- 
tain to each particular branch. 



56 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

AIR FORCE COURSE 

5 a-b-c. Air Science and Tactics. First year basic course in Air Science 
consists of two hours classroom work and three hours of drill and outdoor 
instruction per week. The three quarters of classroom instruction is devoted 
to world political geography. 

6 a-b-c. Air Science and Tactics. Second Year Basic course in Air Science 
consists of two hours of classroom work and three hours of drill and out- 
door instruction per week. The three quarters of classroom instruction is 
devoted to aerodynamics and propulsion, meteorology, navigation, personal 
maintenance, maps, aerial photography, air force organization, and applied 
air power. 

355 a-b-c. Am Science and Tactics. First year advanced course in Air 
Science consists of four hours of classroom work and two hours of drill and 
outdoor instruction per week. In the classroom, air operations is a common 
subject; then the course is specialized into three options. For students in 
the school of Business Administration the Comptrollership option includes 
program standards, statistical services, analysis presentation, budget plan- 
ning, USAF disbursement system, cost control system, and the Auditor. For 
students physically qualified and interested in later flight training the 
Flight Operations option includes Major USAF Commands, air navigation, 
meteorology, principles of flight, aircraft engineering, and instruments. The 
Administration and Logistics option includes administration, transportation, 
and supply. 

356 a-b-c. Air Science and Tactics. Second year Advanced course in Air 
Science consists of four hours of classroom work and two hours of drill and 
outdoor instruction per week. Military law, military teaching methods, per- 
sonnel management, The Inspector General, logistics, and career develop- 
ment are the common subjects; then a continuance of the specialized train- 
ing in the selected options of Comptrollership, Flight Operations, and Ad- 
ministration and Logistics. 



PROGRAMS FOR VETERANS 

In May 1944, the University established a Veterans Division, the par- 
ticular responsibility of which is the planning for and supervision of special 
needs for former service men and women in the University. The United 
States Congress has passed two Acts under which veterans may apply for 
compensation to attend an educational institution, the Serviceman's Re- 
adjustment Act of 1944, Title II, Public Law 346, and Public Law 16. Pub- 
lic Law 16 provides for disabled veterans and 346 (G. I. Bill of Rights) 
provides for all other service men and women who were in the armed forces 
more than ninety days. Veterans applying under Public Law 346 should 
secure and fill out Rehabilitation Form 1950 and forward it to the Veterans 
Administration so that they may secure a Certificate of Eligibility and En- 
titlement which will admit them to college training. 

The University has provided a Director to assist veterans in securing ad- 
mission to the University of Georgia and in counseling with them about 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



personal matters and problems. Many counselors connected with the schools 
and colleges assist the Director of the Veterans Division in working out 
programs of education to fit the needs of the applicants. 

On the campus is located a Veterans Guidance Center, a joint enterprise 
of the Federal government and the University. Occupational tests and 
guidance are afforded all students enrolled under Public Law 346 after they 
have secured a Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement. All students under 
Public Law 16 are required to take this counseling service. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

UNITS OF CREDIT 

The unit of credit is the quarter hour. A quarter hour represents one 
hour of class work per week for one quarter or its equivalent in other 
forms of instruction. Two or sometimes three hours of laboratory work 
are considered as the equivalent of one hour of class work. The majority 
of the courses offered in the University meet five times per week for one 
quarter; such courses carry a credit of five quarter hours. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Quarter grades are reported by alphabetical letter only, although they 
are commonly based on averages of numerical grades given on daily work 
and final examinations. The scale of letter grades is as follows: 

A-f Exceptional 

A Excellent 

B+ Very Good 

B Good 

C-f- Average 

C Fair 

D+ Poor 

D Very Poor 

E Condition 

F Failure. No credit unless course is repeated. 

I Incomplete. This grade indicates that a student although doing 

satisfactory work was, for some reason beyond his control, un- 
able to complete the course. 

W This grade indicates that the student was permitted to withdraw 
from the course and that no grade was assigned. 

WF This grade indicates that the student was permitted to withdraw 
from the course while doing unsatisfactory work. The dropping 
of a course under these circumstances is equivalent to a failure. 

CHANGES IN GRADES 

A grade in a course reported by the instructor to the Registrar and 
reeorded cannot be changed except in the following circumstances: 

E may be changed to D if so reported by the instructor within twelve 
months. 



58 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

I may be changed to any grade if so reported by the instructor within 
twelve months. 

Any grade will be changed upon a written statement by the instructor 
that the grade reported was a factual error. 

A senior in line for graduation who makes a grade of F or D in his senior 
year in a course numbered 200 or above necessary for his degree will have 
the privilege of one re-examination, provided there is no opportunity to re- 
peat the course. Grades in not more than two courses may be thus changed. 
Permits for a re-examination should be obtained from the Registrar's Office. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

In the undergraduate schools and colleges of the University a student will 
be classified as a freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior, according to the 
number of quarter academic hours of work he has completed with an average 
grade of C or better. A student who has completed less than 37 hours of 
the number of hours required for graduation will be classified as a fresh- 
man. A student will be entitled to register as a sophomore when he has 
completed at least 37 hours; as a junior when he has completed at least 
84 hours; and as a senior where he has completed at least 131 hours. 

The classification under which a student registers at the beginning of the 
academic year will continue throughout that year. 

Registration for Courses. Any student classified as a junior or senior 
must give priority at registration to all uncompleted freshman and sopho- 
more courses required for his degree before continuing the major subjects 
or electives. 

COURSE NUMBERS 

Courses numbered from 1 to 199 are designed for freshman and sopho- 
more students; those numbered from 200 to 399 are offered primarily for 
junior and senior students; courses taken by juniors and seniors along 
with graduate students carry the numbers 400 to 599 for undergraduates 
and 600 to 799 for graduate students. Courses numbered 800 to 999 are of- 
fered for graduate students only. 

With the approval of the dean of his college or school, a student may 
include in his sophomore program as much as one-third of his work in 
courses falling within the junior-senior group; with the same approval 
a student may include in his junior-senior program as much as one-third 
of his work in courses falling within the freshman-sophomore group. 

NORMAL LOAD OF WORK 

The normal load of work for freshman and sophomore students is 15 
hours per quarter, exclusive of Military Science 1-2 or Air Science 5-6, and 
Physical Education 1-2. The normal load of work for junior and senior stu- 
dents is 15 hours per quarter except where otherwise stated in the published 
degree requirements. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 59 

VARIATION FROM THE NORMAL LOAD OF WORK 

The dean of a school or college may, at his discretion, authorize the fol- 
lowing variations from the normal work load: 

1. A minimum load of 10 hours. 

2. An increase of from 1 to 3 hours: (1) When advanced military science 
is taken or when difficulty in making a practical schedule or a satis- 
factory program demands it; (2) students who had an average of B 
on the work of the three preceeding quarters may have this privilege 
during the succeeding three quarters; (3) students who had an average 
of B in the preceding quarter may have this privilege the succeeding 
quarter. 

3. A maximum of 21 hours may be permitted: (1) students on the cur- 
rent Dean's List; (2) students not on the Dean's List but who had 
an average of "A" on the work of the preceding quarter; (3) first 
year transfer students who received an average grade of "A" on their 
last year's work in the institution from which they transferred; (4) 
students having 90 academic hours credit with no grade lower than 
"C" for the preceding quarter and having no "F," "WF," "E," or un- 
removed I for the preceding three quarters. (No student with less 
than 15 hours in residence is eligible.) 

4. An increase of 10 hours (distributed over their last three quarters) 
for seniors who, at the beginning of any quarter, can, with this privi- 
lege, graduate in three quarters. 

Under no circumstances is any student permitted to receive credit for 
more than 21 hours per quarter, exclusive of Military Science 1-2, Air Science 
5-6, or Physical Education 1-2. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Residence. The minimum residence requirement for a baccalaureate de- 
gree is three quarters, during which time a candidate must earn credits in 
courses numbered 200 or above of at least 45 hours with an average grade 
of "C" or better. It is required that at least thirty hours of the last three 
quarters' work before graduation be taken in residence and be in courses 
numbered 200 or above. It is also required that at least half the courses 
constituting a student's major study be taken in residence. 

If a student elects to satisfy the requirement for the B.S. degree by 
substituting the first year's work in the Medical College of Georgia for his last 
year's work in the University, the residence rule as stated in the preceding 
paragraph is modified to the extent of reducing from 45 to 30 hours the 
credits he must earn in courses numbered 200 or above after admission to 
senior division standing. 

For candidates for the B.S. Nursing Education degree, "residence" is inter- 
preted to include the Atlanta Division of the University as well as the Athens 
Campus. 

Credits and Grades. Each candidate for a degree must secure credit in 
approved courses totaling at least the number of quarter hours required 
for a degree by the school or college in which he is registered, exclusive 
of courses in Military Science 1-2 or Air Science 5-G, and Physical Education 
1-2. In securing this credit each candidate must have an average grade of 
not less than "C" in all grades received, excluding those in basic military 



60 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

science and physical education, and must not have grades below "C" in more 
than one-fourth of the total number of quarter hours earned. 

The College of Arts and Sciences and several other colleges and schools 
require for graduation 185 quarter hours, exclusive of Military Science 1-2 
or Air Science 5-6 and Physical Education 1-2. Some of the schools re- 
quire a larger number of hours. Under the sections devoted to the several 
colleges and schools will be found statements of their exact requirements. 

Correspondence and Extension Work. Not more than one-fourth of the 
work counted toward a degree may consist of courses taken by correspondence 
or extension. 

Military and Air Science. All men students in the freshman and sopho- 
more classes who are citizens of the United States and who are not physically 
disqualified or otherwise exempted must take the basic courses in military 
or air science and tactics. The basic courses are Military Science 1-2 and 
Air Science 5-6. 

Physical Education. All non-veteran freshman and sophomore men and 
all freshman and sophomore women are required to complete, with passing 
grades, Physical Education 1 and 2. Students physically or organically handi- 
capped will be assigned to special Physical Education classes. Students who 
have finished freshman and sophomore requirements in approved institu- 
tions will not be required to take Physical Education 1 and 2. 

Examination on the Constitutions. Examinations on the Constitution 
of the United States and that of the State of Georgia, required of all persons 
receiving a degree from the University unless exempted by credit in courses 
dealing with these Constitutions, are given annually on the first Thursday 
after Washington's birthday and the first Thursday after the Fourth of 
July, at 3:30 in Room 212 of the Academic Building. A series of lectures 
to aid students in preparing for these examinations is offered during the 
two weeks preceding the examination in February. Special examinations for 
students having failed on or been absent from the regular examinations are 
offered on the first Thursday in May and the first Thursday in November, 
and in exceptional cases upon other dates. 

Special Requirements. Candidates for degrees from the University must 
show that they have met all general University requirements with respect 
to such matters as registration and payment of fees and the special require- 
ments of the colleges or schools in which they have been registered as 
students. 

All candidates for degrees should check with the Registrar and dean of 
their school or college their program for graduation three quarters prior 
to the date of graduation. Students who fail to perform this duty will 
forfeit any equity in the adjustment of errors or omissions made in their 
programs. 

A candidate for a degree, unless excused in writing by the secretary of 
the faculty, must attend the graduation exercises at which he expects a 
degree to be conferred upon him. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 61 

The University reserves the right to withhold the diploma of a student who 
has completed all academic requirements if he is guilty of conduct which 
is morally reprehensible or is of such disorderly nature that could have been 
disciplined by expulsion. 

MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS 

High School Subjects Not to be Duplicated. No University credit will 
be granted for work in mathematics, foreign language, or other courses 
taken at the University when such work is a repetition of studies already 
completed in high school. 

Forfeiture of Credit. By registering for a course for which he has already 
received credit either by work at the University or by transfer of credits 
from another institution, a student forfeits the previous credit in that 
course. The student's final grade in the course will be the one made on the 
repetition. 

No Extension Work by Residence Students. Extension or correspondence 
work for University credit may not be taken by a student while registered 
as a resident student, except in extraordinary cases and when authorized 
by the dean of the college or school as a part of the student's normal load 
of work. 

Changes in Courses. Changes in a student's program of courses may be 
made only with the approval of the dean of the college or school in which 
the student is registered. Changes will not be permitted unless requested 
during the first four days of the quarter. A service fee of $2 may be assessed 
for each change, though no charge will be imposed for changes made neces- 
sary by University regulations. 

Dropping of Courses. A student may not drop a course without the per- 
mission of the dean of his college or school. 

Admission to Examination in a Course Taken in the University. No 
student who has not registered for the course will be admitted to the final 
examination, and only under extraordinary circumstances will he be admitted 
to the examination unless he has attended at least 50 per cent of the total 
class and laboratory exercises held in the course. 

Special Course in Reading and Study Skills, Designated Psychology 99. 
This course is required of all freshmen designated on the basis of Place- 
ment Tests. Designated freshmen will not be admitted to second quarter of 
freshman English until satisfactory completion of this course is reported by 
the instructor. With the approval of the instructor, students not included 
on this list, but referred by faculty members, may register for the course. 
Such students will not exceed one-fourth the size of the class. 

Class Attendance. All students are expected to attend regularly the 
meetings of classes in courses for which they are registered. A student who 
incurs an excessive number of absences may be placed on probation or 
dismissed from the University. 

Absences From Classes Before and After Holidays. A student who is 
absent from any class or regular University exercise on the day before or 



62 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

the day after a holiday period and who has no valid excuse for such absence 
may be required to pay to the University treasurer a fine of $2 for each of 
the days on which an absence occurred. Validity of the excuse will be de- 
termined by the registrar. 

Student Conduct. A student is expected to show under all circumstances 
a proper respect for order, morality, and the rights of others, and such 
sense of personal honor as is demanded of good citizens. 

Social Probation. For any serious or repeated infraction of regulations. 
a student or group may be placed on social probation which indicates that 
any further infraction of regulations may cause suspension from the Uni- 
versity. 

The University reserves the right to exclude at any time students whose 
conduct is deemed improper or prejudicial to the interests of the University 
community. 

Withdrawal From the University. No student is permitted to withdraw 
from the University after registration for a term without notifying the 
Dean of Men or Dean of Women, who shall notify the Registrar and the stu- 
dent's parents. Veterans receiving allowances under any of the acts of Con- 
gress must also notify the Director of the Veterans Division. Refunds will 
be based on the date of such notification. 

A student against whom charges are pending will not be permitted to 
withdraw from the University until such charges shall have been adjudicated. 

In general a student voluntarily withdrawing may return later if scholasti- 
cally eligible. 

Reports to Parents. At the close of each quarter reports of students' 
grades will be mailed to parents or guardians. In the case of freshmen, a 
report will be made at the end of the first six weeks of the fall quarter. 

Reports will also be made to the parent regarding any official action that 
has the effect of placing a student on probation or of excluding him from 
the University. 

SCHOLASTIC PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 

Probation. A student who fails to pass in any quarter at least ten hours 
of work (exclusive of basic military or air science and physical education) 
shall be placed on scholastic probation. A student remains on scholastic 
probation until he passes 15 hours** of work in one quarter. No student will 
be credited with the completion of the requirements for graduation while on 
probation unless he passes every course taken during that quarter. 

Dismissal. 

1. A student, other than a first quarter freshman,* MUST pass at least 
five** hours of work in any one quarter or be dismissed from the Univer- 
sity. 

2. A first quarter freshman who passes less than five hours of work MUST 
be dismissed from the University but he will be permitted to apply for re- 



*A first quarter freshman refers to a student who has had no previous university 
or college work. 

**Exclusive of basic military or air science and physical education. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 63 

admission for the following quarter. If he elects this privilege he must, 
prior to his registration, go through the testing and advisement procedure 
provided by the counseling organization in the administration of the Dean 
of Faculties. His readmission shall be decided upon by a committee com- 
posed of his academic Dean, the Dean of Faculties and the Director of 
the University Guidance Center. If the freshman is readmitted he shall 
repeat at least five hours of the work he failed during the first quarter. 
These five hours plus an additional five academic hours (exclusive of re- 
medial courses) shall be the work which, in accordance with Item 3 below, 
he must pass or be dismissed. 

Whether or not the freshman elects this privilege, a scholastic dismissal 
will be entered on his record and the next scholastic dismissal will become 
final. 

3. A student on scholastic probation must pass 10 hours** of work in one 
quarter or be dismissed. 

4. A student on scholastic probation for three consecutive quarters must 
be dismissed. 

Counseling. Every quarter students with poor scholastic records should 
be advised that unless their record improves markedly in the next quarter 
they should withdraw from the University. Such students should be warned 
that they may be dismissed. 

Dismissed Students Readmitted on Probation. No dismissed student may 
be readmitted before the expiration of one quarter. As a condition precedent 
to readmission, the student must go through the testing and advisement 
procedure provided by the counseling organization under the administration 
of the Dean of Faculties. Should the counseling officers report that the stu- 
dent is competent to carry on college work, the dean of his college may re- 
admit him. If a dismissed student should be readmitted by the dean of his 
college or school he shall be on scholastic probation until he has passed fif- 
teen hours** work in one quarter. 

Dismissal for Declining to Fulfill ROTC Agreement. Students who de- 
cline, after consultation with appropriate ROTC and University officials, to 
fulfill the terms of their ROTC deferment agreements pertaining to under- 
graduate work at the institution will be permanently dismissed immediately. 

Admission to Another College or School. A student dismissed from a 
college or school may not transfer to another college or school until after 
the expiration of his period of dismissal, and then only with the consent 
of the deans of the two colleges or schools involved. The dean of the col- 
lege to which admission is sought should take the initiative in the matter 
of transfer by conferring with the dean of the college from which the student 
was dismissed. 

Permanent Dismissal. If under the operation of these rules a student 
should be dismissed a second time, the dismissal shall be permanent. 

Eligibility for Student Activities. A student who is on scholarship 
probation is not eligible for participation in any extra-curricular activity 



'Exclusive of basic military or air science and physical education. 



64 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

or to represent the University or student body in any official capacity. This 
includes members or managers of athletic teams, debating teams, glee clubs, 
dramatic clubs, student publications, campus leaders, officers of the fra- 
ternity and sorority council, officers of student government, officers of any 
other activities, which, in the judgment of the Dean of Men or Dean of 
Women, should be included. A student who is ineligible because of a con- 
ditional grade which placed him on probation may become eligible by remov- 
ing this conditional grade. Students on conduct probation are ineligible to 
participate in such activities as those above mentioned. 



HONORS 

The University strives to promote excellence in scholarship by giving 
official recognition to those students whose scholastic work is of a superior 
character. It also recognizes outstanding ability in speaking, writing, and 
other forms of scholarly activity. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

The University awards degrees with honors to candidates who achieve speci- 
fied scholastic records. Not more than 45 quarter hours taken at other insti- 
tutions may be applied to the degree with honors requirements. Such trans- 
ferred hours that are used must have a grade of A or A+. The specified 
scholastic records and honors are: cum laude for an average of 90.0 to 92.9; 
magna cum laude for an average of 93.0 or better; summa cum laude for 
a record with all grades A or A+. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

A junior or senior student of superior scholastic standing who wishes to 
pursue independent study in a particular subject may do so upon the recom- 
mendation of his major professor and the approval of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

VALEDICTORIAN 

In the spring of each year the Registrar prepares a list of the names 
of the five members of the graduating class who have the highest averages 
on the work done in the University of Georgia. From this list the members 
of the senior class choose a valedictorian. A student is not eligible for 
this honor unless all of the work of his junior and senior years is taken 
in residence at the University. 

HONOR FRATERNITIES AND SOCIETIES 

Several honor fraternities and societies at the University extend recogni- 
tion to students on the basis of scholarship and good character. There are 
chapters of Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, and of many college, 
school, and departmental honor societies. Membership in these societies is 
highly prized in educational circles. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 65 

HONOR LIST 

After the close of the college year, an Honor List is made up for all 
classes on the basis of the work of the year. The first group on this list 
constitutes the Dean's list and consists of those who have made an average 
grade of 90 or whose grades place them in the upper five per cent of their 
class. The second group in the Honor List consists of those whose grades 
place them in the upper ten per cent of their class but whose names are 
not included in the Dean's List. In the case of freshmen and sophomores, 
the Honor List is made on the basis of the total enrollment in all of the 
schools and colleges of the University. 

One day of each year is set aside as an occasion for according special recog- 
nition to those students whose names appear on the Honor List and those who 
have been elected to the Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, or other 
honorary scholastic societies. 

UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS. HONORS. AWARDS 
AND PRIZES 

Unless otherwise specified these scholarships, honors, awards, and prizes 
are open to both men and women. 

Agricultural Engineering Faculty Award. Each year the faculty of the 
Department of Agricultural Engineering gives special recognition to those 
students in the department whose accomplishments have been outstanding. 
The awards are made on the basis of scholastic attainment, character, and 
leadership. The names of those selected are engraved on a bronze plaque. 
Each student selected receives a one-year membership in the American 
Society of Agricultural Engineering. 

Alpha Kappa Psi Prize. The Alpha Kappa Psi national commerce fra- 
ternity awards annually a gold pin to that member of the junior class of 
the College of Business Administration, who, in the opinion of the faculty 
of the College, has made the best record during the year. The award is 
based on scholarship and character. 

Art Students' League Awards. Awards are given for the outstanding works 
of art shown in the students' exhibition at the end of the school year after 
the Shorter Awards are given. The art faculty and a committee of Art 
Students' League members form a jury to select the work. 

The University of Georgia Art Students' League gives to a student in the 
Art Department an award called the Lamar Dodd Award for outstanding 
work and service. Usually, but not necessarily, this award is given to a 
senior. The award consists of the students name being engraved on a 
cup which remains the property of the Art Department. Students and fac- 
ulty of the department make the selection. 

Shorter Awards. Five purchase prizes of $20 each are offered by Edward 
S. Shorter, Columbus, Georgia. These prizes are given to students of the 
Art Department for work of outstanding merit selected by the faculty of 
the department. Works receiving these awards will remain the property 
of the department. 



66 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Gustav H. Niemeyeb A wabd. Mr. Gustav H. Niemeyer, President of Handy 
& Harman, awarded the Department of Art $100 in 1951. This stimulus is 
extended over four years, with twenty-five dollars going to the student who 
does the best silver work throughout each year. 

Bryan Prize. The late William Jennings Bryan gave to the University 
the sum of $250 and directed that the income of this amount be awarded 
annually as a prize to that student who writes the best essay on the demo- 
cratic form of government. Essays are submitted to the Head of the De- 
partment of Political Science and are judged by a committee of the faculty 
of this department. 

Edward A. Burdette Memorial Medal. This medal is offered by Mrs. 
L. G. Daingerfield in memory of her son, Edward A. Burdette. It is awarded 
to that member of the senior class, who, in the judgment of the faculty of 
the English Department, has done the best work as a major student in the 
field of English. 

Nathan Burkan Memorial Competition. The American Society of Com- 
posers, Authors, and Publishers annually offers a cash award of $100 to 
that student of the graduating class who submits the best paper on Copy- 
right Law. Selection is made by Law faculty. 

Chi Omega Prize. The Mu Beta Chapter of the Chi Omega Society offers 
a prize of $25 to the outstanding woman student in sociology, economics, 
psychology, and political science in rotating order. For the year 1952-1953 
the prize will be awarded in economics. In order to be eligible for this prize, 
a student must take at least three courses per quarter throughout the year. 

Joe Brown Connally Prize. This prize of $100 was established by his fam- 
ily in memory of Joe Brown Connally. It is awarded annually to that mem- 
ber of the junior class who is most proficient in Georgia history. Selection 
made by Head of the History Department in consultation with the instructor 
of the class in Georgia History. 

Dairy Products Judging Award. Trophies and products are given by 
various commercial companies to encourage interest in the Dairy Products 
Judging Contest, which is open to all students interested in judging dairy 
products. 

Debators Medal. The University awards annually a key to each of the 
six members of the freshman class who are selected by the Debate Council 
for membership on the Freshman Debate Team. 

Delta Air Lines Scholarship in Aeronautical Administration. Created 
in 1951 by a principal gift of $5,000 from Delta Air Lines, Inc., it is adminis- 
tered by the University of Georgia Foundation and provides for an annual 
award of $300 to a selected student majoring in aeronautical administration, 
available for both junior and senior years for the winner. 

Delta Delta Delta War Scholarship. A fund set up by the local chap- 
ter of the Delta Delta Delta Sorority and the national organization to aid 
a junior or senior woman to continue her studies. Application blanks may 
be secured from the Secretary of Scholarship Committee. Recommendations 



GENERAL INFORMATION 67 

are made to the national sorority by a local committee; final awards are made 
by National Office of Delta Delta Delta. 

Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key. The Delta Sigma Pi national com- 
merce fraternity awards annually a gold key to that member of the senior 
class of the College of Business Administration, who, in the opinion of the 
faculty of the College, has made the best record during the year. The 
award is based on scholarship and character. 

The Felton Fund. This fund was established by the will of Rebecca Lati- 
more Felton in memory of her children, and is to be used to educate and 
assist in the education of men students. The fund is administered by the 
First National Bank of Atlanta. 

Harrison Prize. The Harrison Company, law-book publishers of Atlanta, 
Georgia, offers as a prize to that member of the law graduating class who 
makes the highest average during his senior year a copy of Powell's Action 
for Land. Selection is made by the Law faculty. 

Walter B. Hill Prize in Ethics. The late Judge Horace Russell estab- 
lished an annual prize of $50 that is awarded to the student who writes the 
best essay on a subject in the field of Ethics assigned by the Professor of 
Philosophy. Award is made by a committee chosen by the faculty of the 
Philosophy Department. 

Prize in Georgia Colonial History. The Athens Town Committee of the 
Georgia Society of Colonial Dames of America offers annually a prize of $50 
for the best paper on some topic of colonial Georgia history, written by 
any University student. 

Junior Orator's Prize. The University awards annually a silver loving 
cup to that member of the junior class who delivers the best original 
oration. Sponsored by Demosthenian and Phi Kappa Literary Societies, 
judged by members of University faculty. 

Kroger Company Scholarship. Four scholarships of $200 each are awarded 
by the Kroger Company to Georgia high school graduates who enter the Col- 
lege of Agriculture and the School of Home Economics the Fall Quarter. 
Application blanks may be obtained from the Dean of the College of Agri- 
culture and the Dean of the School of Home Economics and must be filed 
by July 1. 

Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Company Prize. The Lawyers Co- 
operative Publishing Company offers as a prize to that member of the class 
in Legal Bibliography who makes the highest grade a copy of Ballentine's 
Law Dictionary. Selection is made by Law faculty. 

Isaac Meinhard Memorial Award. A fund of one thousand dollars from 
which the net annual income is used to provide an annual prize for the 
student who has the highest average grade for all of his law work. Selected 
by Law faculty. 

Quimby Melton-Griffin News Prize. A prize of twenty-five dollars given 
by Quimby Melton, editor and publisher of the Griffin News, to the winner 
of an essay contest, the subject of the essay and the number of words 



68 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

determined by the donor. A committee of judges is appointed by the Dean 
of the School of Journalism and Mr. Melton. 

Hamilton McWhorter Prize. Hamilton McWhorter of the class of 1875 
provided for the award annually of a medal to that member of the fresh- 
man class of the University having the highest scholastic average on the 
year's work. 

Bert Michael Scholarship. The family of the late Bert Michael of the 
class of 1912 gave to the University a fund of $1,000. The income of this 
fund is awarded annually as a prize to that member of the junior class 
who is selected by a committee of the faculty. In making the award the 
faculty committee considers scholarship, qualities of character, and also 
financial need. 

Music Scholarship. Private donations to the Music Department to pro- 
vide small scholarships for outstanding students. Correspondence concern- 
ing the scholarships should be addressed to Hugh Hodgson, Head of the 
Music Department. 

Omicron Delta Kappa Prize. The Omicron Delta Kappa honorary fra- 
ternity awards annually a silver loving cup to that male student in the 
University who makes the highest scholastic average during the academic 
year. In order to be eligible for this prize, a student must have been in 
residence at the University for three quarters. 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers two 
scholarships of the value of $50 each per quarter, or $200 each per year of 
four quarters. These scholarships are awarded to men and women in the 
upper one-third of the graduating class who are in need of financial assist- 
ance and who can present proper letters of recommendations. For informa- 
tion on these scholarships, prospective applicants should write the Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Georgia Scholastic Press Association Scholarships. Two scholarships 
yearly to high school graduates equivalent in value to the matriculation 
fee. The winners are chosen by the faculty of the School of Journalism 
through the GSPA upon recommendation of the faculty advisers of the 
various high school publications of the state. Correspondence concerning 
these scholarships should be addressed to John E. Drewry, Dean of the 
School of Journalism. 

Purina Mills Scholarship. The Purina Mills Company of St. Louis gives 
a scholarship that consists of paying the recipient's expenses for one month 
of study in the factories and laboratories of the company and a leadership 
course on Lake Michigan to an outstanding member of the junior class in 
Animal Husbandry. The staff of the Animal Husbandry Department makes 
the selection. 

Redfearn Prize. Mr. D. H. Redfearn, '09, of the Miami bar offers a prize 
of $50 to the law student writing the best article on Suggested Changes in 
the Remedial Laics of Georgia. Selected by Law faculty. 

The Neel Reid Memorial Scholarship Loan Fund. The Peachtree Garden 
Club of Atlanta in 1947, as a memorial to Neel Reid, established a fund, the 



GENERAL INFORMATION 69 

income of which is to be awarded to a student in the Department of Land- 
scape Architecture at the end of the freshman year. This gift, the corpus 
of which is $7,000, is administered by the University of Georgia Foundation. 

Mary Rosenblatt Aet Scholarship Fund. Mr. and Mrs. William L. F. 
Rosenblatt in 1949, as a memorial to their daughter, Mary Lillian Rosen- 
blatt, a member of the Art Staff of the University from 1929 through 1934, 
established a trust fund with the University of Georgia Foundation. The 
income is to be used to aid worthy students in the Department of Art. Ap- 
plication should be made with the Head of the Department of Art. 

Horace Russell Prize in Psychology. The late Judge Horace Russell 
established an annual prize of $50 that is awarded to the student who writes 
the best essay on a subject in the field of psychology assigned by the Pro- 
fessor of Psychology. 

Jessie Woodrow Sayre Prize. The Jessie Woodrow Sayre Scholarship 
Foundation provides $100 annually to be used as a prize for the student 
of the College of Arts and Sciences who submits the best paper on World 
Relations. Papers are submitted to the Head of the Department of Political 
Science and are judged by a committee of the faculty of the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

Sigma Delta Chi Scholarship Awards. The Sigma Delta Chi national 
journalistic fraternity awards annually a certificate and key to the out- 
standing male senior in journalism. He is selected by a committee com- 
posed of the president of the local chapter of Sigma Delta Chi, the faculty 
adviser of the chapter, and one alumni member. 

Sigma Delta Chi Scholarship Awards. The Sigma Delta Chi National 
journalistic fraternity awards annually certificates of distinction to those 
graduates of the School of Journalism who stand in the upper ten percent 
of their class. 

Sophomore Declamation Prize. The University awards each year a silver 
loving cup to that member of the sophomore class who is adjudged to be 
the best declaimer. Sponsored by Demosthenian and Phi Kappa Literary 
Societies, judged by members of the University faculty. 

Special Scholarship Awards. From various sources the University has 
funds available for scholarship grants which may be awarded according 
to the provisions of the donations. These scholarships range in amounts 
from tuition and fees to all necessary expenses to attend the University. 

Swift and Company Scholarship. Swift and Company of Chicago offers 
a scholarship that consists of paying the recipient's expenses in Chicago 
for one week of intensive instruction in livestock marketing to the student 
who writes the best essay on some phase of livestock marketing. This 
scholarship is administered by the Animal Husbandry Department. 

U. D. C. Scholarships. Yearly scholarships, equivalent in value to the 
matriculation fee. Recipient, who is selected by the Laura Rutherford 
Chapter of the U. D. C. of Athens, Georgia, must be a lineal descendant 
of a Confederate veteran. Correspondence concerning this scholarship should 
be addressed to the Laura Rutherford Chapter of the U. D. C. 



70 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

A similar scholarship is awarded a student named by the national or- 
ganization of the United Daughters of the Confederacy under its rules gov- 
erning the award. Correspondence concerning this should be addressed to 
the National Office of the U. D. C. 

Watson Scholarship. Colonel J. D. Watson, of Winder, Georgia, has 
provided scholarships similar in value to the matriculation fee for a number 
of his nieces, nephews, and other relatives. 

The Willcox Prize in French. This prize was founded in 1896 as a me- 
morial to their father by the sons of Professor Cyprian Porter Willcox, who, 
from 1872 until his death in 1895, filled with great distinction the chair of 
Modern Foreign Languages at the University. It will be offered to a stu- 
dent who has, in the opinion of the department, achieved excellence in 
French at the intermediate level. The nature of the award will be an- 
nounced by the Department of Modern Foreign Languages during the course 
of the academic year. 

The Willcox Prize in German. This prize was founded in 1896 as a 
memorial to their father by the sons of Professor Cyprian Porter Willcox, 
who, from 1872 until his death in 1895, filled with great distinction the chair 
of Modern Foreign Languages at the University. It will be offered to a stu- 
dent who has, in the opinion of the department, achieved excellence in Ger- 
man at the intermediate level. The nature of the award will be announced 
by the Department of Modern Foreign Languages during the course of the 
academic year. 

R. C. Wilson Award. Created in 1947 by I. Z. Harris of the class of 1915 
in honor of Robert C. Wilson, Dean Emeritus of the School of Pharmacy, this 
annual award of at least $50 goes to the "outstanding Pharmacy senior" 
elected by Pharmacy students. This fund is administered by the University 
of Georgia Foundation. 

Xi Sigma Pi Award. The Forestry Club of the University offers a prize 
of $10 to that member of the freshman class of the School of Forestry 
who does the most outstanding work during the year. Selected by a com- 
mittee from the organization. 

For further information concerning any of the above scholarships, write 
to the Director of Placement and Student Aid. 

Fellowships, scholarships, and prizes for graduate students will be found 
under Graduate School. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

STUDENT COUNSELING 

The University maintains certain counseling and guidance services for 
all of its students. Each academic dean either personally or through ap- 
pointed assistants guides each student in his academic problems, especially 
in arranging schedules, the satisfaction of degree requirements, problems 
about probation and other problems of an academic character. In addition 
counseling and guidance services of other sorts are available. The Dean of 



GENERAL INFORMATION 71 

Men and Dean of Women and their staffs are especially concerned with prob- 
lems which do not lie entirely in the academic field. Attached to these staffs 
are counselors to men and women students. The Guidance Center has testing 
and clinical services, designed chiefly for veterans but also available for 
certain testing programs and for special cases of any nature referred to it 
by the other counseling units, whether the student is a veteran or not. The 
staff of the Psychology Department has been active in the counseling of 
students. The College of Education has a counseling clinic especially for its 
students set up as part of its teaching program. The Office of Placement 
and Student Aid offers financial and vocational guidance service to all stu- 
dents, especially for seniors or those seeking work either on or off the cam- 
pus. 

The University is attempting to maintain close personal relations between 
the students and the faculty members; and a part of each teacher's duties 
is personal conferences and the personal guidance of students, whether 
formal or informal in nature. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 
The Department of Student Health was established for the protection and 
care of the health of students attending the University. In 1940 Judge 
Price Gilbert gave to the University funds for the erection of a new in- 
firmary. This building is known as Gilbert Memorial Infirmary. 

A part of the fees paid by each student goes into a fund for the support 
of the infirmary. The doctor is in the infirmary from 9 A. M.-l P. M. and 2-5 
P. M. weekdays and until noon on Saturday. The nursing staff is on duty 
constantly and will be in contact with the doctor at all times. Physical exami- 
nations are to be done by the home physician and sent to the infirmary. 
Students desiring first aid or who are ill are seen by the doctor or nurse in 
the order in which they arrive and emergencies are seen at once. Students 
requiring hospitalization are admitted and treated in the infirmary, except 
for some contagious diseases and for surgical operations. A charge of $1.50 
per day is made to cover costs of meals and bed linen for patients admitted. 
Routine X-ray and laboratory facilities are available at the infirmary; more 
specialized procedures must be referred to the proper department of either 
of the local hospitals. 

The University does not attempt to provide the services of various special- 
ists, dental care, special nursing, or other unusual treatment as a regular 
part of its health program. When such services become necessary, the Uni- 
versity physician (preferably after consultation with the parents of the 
student involved) refers the case to a local specialist or consultant. The. 
infirmary fee does not cover the cost of such special services. In case of 
an operation or certain types of contagious diseases the specialist will place 
the student in one of the two local hospitals, at the expense of the student, 
or if able to travel the student will be sent to the home physician. 

UNIVERSITY LECTURE SERIES 

A portion of the fees paid by students is set aside in a special fund to 
provide financial support for the University Lecture Series. Each year 
several distinguished speakers and artists are brought to the University. 



72 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The object of these programs is to offer to the students the advantages of 
cultural entertainments. Every student during the period of his residence 
at the University has the opportunity to see and hear some of the most 
renowned figures in the artistic, literary, and scientific worlds. 

ART, DRAMA, AND MUSIC ACTIVITIES 

The Art Department presents exhibitions of the work of both old and 
contemporary artists in a constantly changing series. The Art Students' 
League sponsors painting and sketching trips, auctions and exhibitions of 
student work as well as other related art activities which are open to stu- 
dents of the entire University. 

The University Theatre of the Department of Speech and Drama produces 
either one or two major productions each quarter. All students of the Uni- 
versity are eligible to participate in any phase of these productions. 

The Department of Speech and Drama, in conjunction with the Univer- 
sity Theatre, brings outstanding professional companies to the campus of 
the University of Georgia during the year. 

Music activities include the Men's Glee Club, the Women's Glee Club, 
the A Cappella Choir, the Madrigal Group, the Symphony Orchestra, the 
University Band, and a dance orchestra. The Men's Glee Club makes at 
least one tour each year. 

Occasionally students particularly qualified for the band or orchestra 
have the opportunity of earning a small amount for their services to these 
groups. This opportunity is often spoken of as a student activity scholar- 
ship but in reality it is part-time work. 

Music Appreciation Hour, conducted every Thursday by the head of the 
Music Department, is designed to teach students to enjoy good music. This 
hour has been very popular with the students and with the people of Athens. 

ATHLETIC PROGRAM 

The University appreciates the interests and needs of men and women 
students in the field of sports activities. To develop the interests and fulfill 
these needs the University sponsors a program of intercollegiate athletics 
and intramural sports activities for men and intramural sports activities 
for women. 

The intercollegiate athletic program includes football, basketball, baseball, 
track, tennis, golf, swimming, cross country, and rifle marksmanship. 

The men's intramural sports program includes touch football, basketball, 
softball, golf, tennis, track, badminton, swimming, horseshoes, volleyball, 
and bowling. 

The women's intramural sports program, sponsored by the Department 
of Physical Education for Women and the Women's Athletic Association, in- 
cludes volleyball, swimming, horseshoes, golf, basketball, bowling, table 
tennis, badminton, softball. tennis, archery, and others. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



FORENSIC ACTIVITIES 

True to the traditions of southern oratory and debate, the University 
offers four debating societies to the students: Demosthenian Literary Society 
and Phi Kappa Literary Society (for men), Pioneer Club (for women), 
and Agricultural Club (for agricultural students). Throughout the year 
intersociety debates and orations maintain unusual interest in the societies. 

Apart from the literary societies the University sponsors debating teams 
open to men and women students. The teams engage the outstanding col- 
leges of the South and of the nation. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Student publications include two of a campus-wide nature. The Red and 
Black (weekly newspaper) and Pandora (the University year book). In ad- 
dition to these campus-wide publications there are certain student publica- 
tions sponsored by the various schools and colleges or by organizations on 
the campus. Among these are: Georgia Agriculturist (monthly magazine 
in the College of Agriculture). Cypress Knee (publication of the School of 
Forestry). The Georgia Clover Leaf (year book of 4-H Clubs), Georgia Agri- 
cultural Engineer (year book of the Department of Agricultural Engineer- 
ing), The Georgia Dairyman (publication of the Dairy Science Club), and 
The Georgia Pharmacist (quarterly publication in the School of Pharmacy). 

STUDENT UNION 

The Student Union in Memorial Hall conducts a wide variety of recrea- 
tional programs and activities. The Union is operated by a director and 
a board of students. Table tennis and billiard tables are available as well 
as a large lounge with phonograph and radio. Special musical and film 
programs and student socials are offered. 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATION 

The University maintains a Chaplain and Assistant Chaplain for the spiri- 
tual guidance of its students. Under the direction of the Chaplain's office 
is the general non-denominational religious organization, the University of 
Georgia Religious Association. Operating largely through its student offi- 
cers, the Religious Association holds religious programs each week through- 
out the regular sessions. The Association also cooperates with the local 
church student groups in assisting them with special projects and in pro- 
moting major religious events for the campus. 

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

Social organizations on the campus include men's Greek letter fraternities 
and women's Greek letter sororities. The organizations, as well as many 
clubs and societies of a social nature, provide the campus with many social 
functions during the year. 



74 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

HOUSING OF STUDENTS 

Residence halls situated on the University campus accommodate approxi- 
mately twenty-two hundred students. Additional housing facilities at fra- 
ternity and sorority houses, religious student centers, YMCA and YWCA 
are also available to students. Private homes and boarding houses list 
available space for single and married students with the University Hous- 
ing Offices. The University does not reserve this housing since arrange- 
ments for it are made by personal interview between home owner and the 
individual applicant. Communications on housing should be addressed to 
Director of Men's Housing or Director of Women's Housing. 

RESIDENCE HALLS FOR MEN 

A reservation fee of $15.00 is required in advance for the Fall Quarter to 
assure space in any one of the men's dormitories on the campus. A reserva- 
tion fee is not required the Winter, Spring, or Summer Quarter on any 
dormitory- The above fee must accompany the application for housing. DO 
NOT SEND CASH. Make check or money order payable to the University of 
Georgia. 

First, file application for room with the Director of Men's Housing; then 
if space is available a room assignment will be made. The amount of the 
reservation fee will be deducted from room charges payable at time of regis- 
tration. REFUND OF RESERVATION FEE CANNOT BE MADE after 
August 15 preceding the Fall Quarter. Notice of withdrawal of room assign- 
ment with request for refund must be given IN WRITING to Director of 
Men's Housing. 

If a student does not appear to occupy a room, or if official notification 
of a delay is not filed within the first five days of a quarter, the University 
reserves the right to cancel the reservation and to assign the room to an- 
other student. 

All entering freshmen are required to live in the dormitory that is desig- 
nated as the "Freshman Dormitory." 

The room rate on dormitories listed below is $42 per quarter including 
flat work laundry. The laundry is picked up from the dormitory and returned 
once a week. Optional laundry consisting of wearing apparel is offered at an 
additional charge. 

All rates are based on occupancy of two or more students per room. Rate 
for single occupancy will be an additional $18 per quarter. The Director 
of Housing reserves the privilege of granting or assigning single occupancy. 

North Campus Dormitories are Candler Hall, *Clark Howell Hall, Joe 
Brown Hall, Law Dormitory, Milledge Hall, Milledge Annex, and Reed Hall. 
Convenient dining facilities are at Denmark Hall. Rate for meals is approxi- 
mately $120 per quarter. 

South Campus Dormitories are Dudley Hall, Fain Hall, and Griggs Hall. 
Convenient dining facilities are at Denmark Hall. Rate for meals is approxi- 
mately $120 per quarter. 



*Frejshman dormitory until the completion of Reed Hall. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 75 

RESIDENCE HALLS FOR WOMEN 

The importance of convenient and suitable living arrangements for women 
students is fully realized by the University, which provides residence halls 
for all women students not living in town with their families. Women stu- 
dents are required to live in University dormitories. The only exceptions 
are: Married students, graduate students, those living with close relatives 
or faculty families and those who are 23 years of age who have parental per- 
mission and a clear conduct record. 

Housing preference forms will be mailed directly to students who have 
been officially admitted to the University by the Director of Admissions. 
RESERVATION FEE of $15, payable by check or money order to the 
order of the University of Georgia, must be attached to Housing Preferance 
Form. (DO NOT SEND CASH). NO DORMITORY ASSIGNMENT CAN BE 
MADE UNTIL RESERVATION FEE IS RECEIVED. The amount of reserva- 
tion fee will be deducted from room charges payable at time of registration. 
REFUND OF RESERVATION FEE CANNOT BE MADE after August 15 
preceding the Fall Quarter, or after December 10 preceding the Winter 
Quarter, or after March 5 preceding the Spring Quarter. Notice of with- 
drawal of room assignment with request for refund must be given IN WRIT- 
ING to the Director of Women's Housing. 

If a student does not appear to occupy a room, or if official notification 
of a delay is not filed within the first five days of a quarter, the University 
reserves the right to cancel the reservation and to assign the room to an- 
other student. 

Lucy Cobb Hall, located on North Milledge Avenue, has accommodations 
for 96 junior and senior women students and has a residence dining hall. 

Mary Lyndon Hall, Rutherford Hall, and Soule Hall are located on 
South Campus and have accommodations for 107, 125, and 110 upperclass 
women students, respectively. 

Jennie Belle Myers Hall is scheduled for completion by September, 1952.* 
The North and South wings will accommodate a total of 325 freshman women 
while 143 senior and graduate women students may be accommodated in the 
Center Section. 

The Room Rate for womens' dormitories is $44.00 per quarter including 
flat work laundry. Laundry allowance per week for women is one spread, 
two sheets, one pillow case, six towels and two wash cloths. 

Dining Facilities are conveniently located. All freshman women students 
residing in University residence halls will have their meals in University 
dining halls. The rate for meals is approximately $120.00 per quarter and 
will be added to room charges payable at registration. 

All rates are based on occupancy of two or more students per room. Rate 
for single occupancy will be an additional $19.50 per quarter. Rate for a pri- 
vate bath will be an additional $10 per quarter. Rate for those occupying 



♦If construction is delayed, temporary housing will be provided until the 
building is ready for occupancy. 



76 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

suites will be an additional $5 per quarter. The Director of Housing re- 
serves the privilege of granting or assigning single occupancy. 

Dormitory Facilities for Men and Women Students. University-operated 
residence halls are opened on the afternoon of the day prior to the first day 
of registration and are closed on the day following the last scheduled date of 
examinations at the end of a quarter. 

All rooms in the residence halls are furnished with single beds or double 
deckers, chairs, study tables, clothes cabinet or closet, and dressers or chest 
of drawers. Students are expected to furnish pillows, bed linens, blankets, 
and towels. It is suggested that students bring study lamps, dresser scarfs, 
and small rugs. Use of extra electrical heat appliances such as pressing irons, 
hot plates, heaters, etc., is not allowed in student rooms. 

Housing for Married Students. Emergency housing has been established 
on the University campus; 137 units for married students without children, 
and 223 units for those with children. These units include trailers, efficiency 
apartments, one-, two- and three-bedroom prefabricated units. Assignments 
to these units are made from a waiting list which is established according 
to date of application filed with Director of Men's Housing. Preference is 
given to veterans. 

Dining Halls. There are five University-operated dining halls situated 
conveniently to serve all the resident students. Each dining hall is super- 
vised by a trained dietitian. 

Laundry Service. The University operates a laundry as a convenience to 
its students and as a safeguard to their health. The quarterly charge made 
for dormitories includes the cost of flat work laundry. 

Room and Board Refunds. A student withdrawing from the University 
will be charged a daily rate for room and board from the beginning of the 
quarter to the date of withdrawal. After deductions for these charges have 
been made, the balance of the student's payments will be refunded to him 
at the end of the quarter. 

Payments for room and board will not be refunded to a student who, while 
continuing as a student in the University, moves to a private home or to 
a sorority or fraternity house, or who ignores a room assignment. 

Room and Board in Fraternity and Sorority Houses. The majority of 
the local chapters of fraternity and sorority organizations at the University 
maintain a house which provides room and board for its members. There 
are fourteen sororities and twenty fraternities at the University. 

All fraternity and sorority houses are under the general supervision of the 
office of the Dean of Student Affairs and his associates. All sorority houses 
and several of the fraternity houses have house directors who exercise an 
immediate supervision over the activities of the houses. Only those women 
students who have lived on the campus for at least one quarter, and who 
are of sophomore standing or above will be permitted to live in sorority 
houses. 

Reservation of Right to Change Fees. The University reserves the right 
to make changes in its fees and charges at the beginning of any quarter 
and without previous notice. This right will be exercised cautiously. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 77 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

FEES PAYABLE ON REGISTRATION 

Matriculation Fee. Resident Students. Each student who is a resident 
of the State of Georgia is required to pay during the registration period at 
the beginning of each quarter a matriculation fee of $57.50. 

Non-Resident Tuition. Every non-resident student shall pay during the 
registration period at the beginning of each quarter a non-resident tuition 
fee of $100 in addition to the regular matriculation fees charged resident 
students. 

Matriculation Fee fob Law Students. Students taking professional work 
in law are required to pay $12.50 more per quarter than regular students. 
Students who are residents of Georgia must pay a quarterly fee of $70 and 
non-resident students are required to pay a non-resident tuition fee of $100 
in addition to the $70 charged resident students. 

Matriculation Fee fob Veterinary Medicine Students. Students taking- 
professional work in veterinary medicine are required to pay $27.50 more 
per quarter than regular students. Students who are residents of Georgia 
must pay quarterly a matriculation fee of $85, and non-resident students 
are required to pay a non-resident tuition fee of $100 in addition to the $85 
charged resident students. 

Health Service Fee. Each student is required to pay during the regis- 
tration period at the beginning of each quarter a health service fee of $2.50. 

Student Nurses. The University of Georgia basic student nurses will be 
charged $10 a quarter while they are having their clinical nursing in- 
struction at the hospitals, except in Public Health for which the fee will 
be $57.50. This fee covers registration and supervision by the University 
Department of Nursing Education. 

Matriculation Fee for Students With Less Than Twelve Quarter Hours. 
Students who are permitted to register for less than twelve quarter hours of 
work must pay a matriculation fee of $4.00 for each quarter hour except 
students in Law whose rate is $5.00 per quarter hour and those in Veterinary 
Medicine whose rate is $6.00. Basic military shall count as 2 hours per quarter 
in assessing fees. In addition to the quarter hour matriculation rates charged 
to resident students, non-resident students must pay a non-resident tuition 
fee of $7.00 for each quarter hour of work taken. 

DEFINITION OF LEGAL RESIDENCE 

To be considered a legal resident of Georgia for the purpose of registering 
at the University of Georgia, a student must present evidence as follows: 

(a) If under 21 years of age, that the supporting parent (or guardian) 
has been a bona fide resident of the State of Georgia for at least one year 
next preceding the registration date. 

In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as the guardian 
of a non-resident minor, such minor does not become a resident until the 
expiration of one year from the date of appointment, and then only upon 
proper showing that such appointment was not made to avoid the non-resident 
fee. 



78 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

(b) If over 21 years of age, that bona fide residence in the State of Georgia 
has been established for at least one year next preceding registration and 
that he is eligible to become a registered voter. No person shall be deemed 
to have gained or lost residence while a student at the University of Georgia. 

Auditor's Fee. Persons desiring to attend courses or lectures without 
examination or credit may secure an auditor's ticket. Fees for auditors are 
the same as those for students registered for credit. 

Breakage Deposits and Special Fees. There are no general laboratory 
fees, but there are a few courses offered that require special fees, such as 
agronomy for cotton grading and field trips; forestry for forestry camp; 
landscape architecture for field trips; and music for private lessons. The 
catalogue description of a course indicates the amount of any special fee that 
may be required of those registering for the course. 

In certain laboratory courses requiring the use of expensive equipment, 
students must pay a breakage deposit fee. This fee will be returned at the 
end of the year less any deductions for breakage. Students whose breakage 
has exceeded the deposit must make an additional payment to the Univer- 
sity. The catalogue statement regarding a course indicates any breakage 
deposit fee that may be required. 

Armed Services Uniforms, Fees, and Textbooks. Students enrolling in the 
Army or Air Force ROTC will be furnished uniforms through the University 
of Georgia at an approximate cost to the student as follows: 

Basic Course $62.50 Plus $2.50 Account Fee 

Advanced Course $87.50 Plus $2.50 Account Fee 

At registration, each student enrolling in basic or advanced ROTC will be 
required to pay the deposit as indicated above. At list of these students will 
be submitted to the ROTC as authority for the military property custodian 
to issue prescribed articles of uniform and insignia. 

Students formally enrolled in ROTC are authorized a commutation in lieu 
of uniform which is earned in accordance with the length of time actually 
enrolled. The uniform allowance for basic course students is $25.00 per stu- 
dent per year not to exceed two years; for advanced course students $100.00 
per student for a two year period. These amounts are subject to change by 
the two departments but were in force for the 1951-52 fiscal year. The amount 
pa;d each student will not exceed the value of the articles of uniform pur- 
chased through the University of Georgia. The account will be balanced and 
fiual settlement will be made by the Treasurer's Office after the close of the 
fiscal year (during the summer), except for advanced course students com- 
pleting the course, whose accounts will be closed and balanced during the 
summer following the end of the second year of the course. Any portion of 
the commutation in lieu of uniform not expended by the student will be re- 
turned by the institution to the Federal Government. 

Students are entitled to retain uniforms, furnished, as personal property. 
The uniforms are identical to those used in the service, and will save the 
cost of same when entering active duty. There will be no refunds on de- 
posits except where the cost of the uniform is less than the total amount 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



of the deposits, plus commutation allowed by the Federal Government, and 
then only after the end of the second year basic and the second year ad- 
vanced, and /or withdrawal for normal reasons. 

All text books and manuals required for courses in Military and Air Science 
and Tactics are furnished free of charge by the U. S. Government; however, 
students are held responsible for them in cases of loss or undue damage. 

TIME AND METHOD OF PAYMENT OF FEES AND CHARGES 

Time of Payment. All fees, deposits, and charges for room and board 
are payable during the registration period at the beginning of each quarter. 
A student is not officially registered as a student in the University until 
such fees and charges are paid. Students who do not make payment within 
the registration period will be required to pay the service charge for late 
registration. 

Method of Payment. All payments should be made to the Treasurer's 
office in the Academic Building on the north campus. Fees and charges 
may be paid in cash or by check in the exact amount of the student's bill. 
If a check given for a student's bill is not paid on presentation to the bank 
on which it is drawn, the student's registration will be cancelled. If the 
registration is cancelled after the registration period for the quarter has 
expired, the student may re-register only on payment of the service charge 
for late registration. 

Students are advised to bring their money in the form of express or 
travelers' checks or money orders and to deposit these in a local bank. 

SPECIAL FEES AND CHARGES 

Service Charge for Late Registration. A student who fails to register 
on the days set aside for that purpose will be subject to penalties as follows: 
For the first day beyond the scheduled dates, $5; and for each succeeding 
day up to and including the fourth day, $2; or a total of $11. 

Special Examination Fee. The University reserves the right to charge 
a fee of $2 for any special examination that may be given at the request 
of a student. 

Fine for Absences Before and After Holidays. A student who is absent 
from any class or regular University exercise on the day before or the day 
after a holiday period and who has no valid excuse for such absence may 
be required to pay a fine of $2 for each of the days on which an absence 
occurred. 

Transcript Fee. A student who has discharged all financial obligations 
to the University is entitled to receive on request and without charge one 
transcript of his academic record. A charge of $1 will be made for each 
additional transcript. 

Diploma Fee. The fee for a diploma is $8 for undergraduate, $10 for mas- 
ters, and $25 for doctors degree, which fee includes rental of cap and gown. 
The doctors fee also includes cost of hood. The Certificate of Foreign Studies 
fee is $5. 



80 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Graduate Record Examination. All graduate students are required to take 
the Graduate Record Examination before they are admitted to candidacy 
for a graduate degree. The fee for students taking this examination under 
the Institutional Plan (scheduled for regularly enrolled students) is $3. For 
students taking the examination under the Independent Plan (scheduled 
primarily for undergraduates and others anticipating graduate work at some 
other institution) the fee is $10. 

FEE REFUNDS 

Students who formally withdraw from the University within one week 
following the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 80 per- 
cent of the fees paid for that quarter. 

Students who formally withdraw within a period of one to two weeks 
after the scheduled registration date are entitled to 60 percent of the fees 
paid for that quarter. 

Students who formally withdraw during the period between two and three 
weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 40 
percent of the fees for that quarter. 

Students who formally withdraw within a period of three to four weeks 
after scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 20 per cent of 
the fees paid for that quarter. 

Students who withdraw after a period of four weeks has elapsed from 
the scheduled registration date will be entitled to no refund of any part of 
the fees paid for that quarter. 

Students suspended for disciplinary reasons shall have no right to a refund 
of any portion of any fees paid. 

Breakage deposits less any authorized deductions will be refunded at the 
end of the academic year or at the close of the quarter following a student's 
withdrawal from the University. 

Information regarding refunds of payment of room and board is set forth 
under the heading of "Student Housing." 

No Refunds of Any Nature Can Be Made Except at the End of a Quarter. 

RESERVATION OF RIGHT TO CHANGE FEES 

The University reserves the right to make changes in its fees and charges 
at the beginning of any quarter and without previous notice. This right 
will be exercised cautiously. 

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES 

It is estimated that the reasonably necessary annual expenses of a student 
at the University vary from $700 to $850. This estimate includes University 
fees and cost of books, military uniform, room, board and laundry; it does 
not include travel, clothing, and incidental expenses. 

Law students, veterinary medicine students, and non-resident students will 
find the cost somewhat more because of the higher fees required of them. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 81 

FINANCIAL AID FOR STUDENTS 

LOAN FUNDS 

For the assistance of deserving students who have not sufficient means 
to pay all their college expenses a number of loan funds have been estab- 
lished by friends of the University. A loan to a student in any academic 
year will not ordinarily exceed the amount of his fees during that year. 

Unless otherwise specified, application for loans should be addressed to 
the office of the Director of Placement and Student Aid, who administers the 
awarding of loans under the policies of a faculty committee. Applications for 
loans should be made at least one month before the time the funds will be 
needed. 

In the following alphabetical list the category of students eligible for the 
loan is indicated. Unless otherwise indicated the loan fund is available only 
to men students. 

Lucile Alexander Fund. Juniors and seniors in the School of Home Eco- 
nomics. 
Alpha Zeta Frxn. Members of the Alpha Zeta Fraternity. 
Alumni Association Fund. (College of Agriculture). The College of Agri- 
culture. 
Preston S. Arkwkight Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
R. & L. Arnold Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Atlaxta Cotton Oil Company Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Atlanta Journal Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Atlanta Stockyards Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Dupree Barrett Fund. Juniors and seniors in the School of Forestry. 
L. H. Beall Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Charles H. Brand Fund. The University. 

Mary Upshaw Broach Scholarship Fund. Home Economics Students. 
Charles McDonald Brown Fund. The University and The Medical College. 
Henry W. Brown Fund. The University. 
Shepard Bryan Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Bernice F. Bullard Fund. Men and women students of the University. 
Asa G. Candler Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Charles H. Chandler Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Charlton County 4-H Club Dawson Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Chamberlain- Johns* >n-DuBose Fund. Juniors and seniors in the School of 

Home Economics. 
A. F. Churchill Memorl\l Fund. Men and women students of the Univer- 
sity. 
Citizens and Southern National Bank Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Obadiah Lewis Cloud Fund. The University. 

E. T. Comer Fund. The University, preference to be given students from 
rural sections. 



82 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The Dawson Fund. Men in the College of Agriculture and women in the 
School of Home Economics. 

Mrs. J. H. Clotjdman Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

D. A. R.-Elijah Clarke Chapter Fund. Women students of the University. 

D. A. R.-Lila Napier Jelks Fund (Hawkinsville Chapter). Junior and 
seniors of the University whose homes are in Pulaski County. 

D. A. R. Memorial Fund. The University. 

D. A. R. Richmond Walton McCurry Fund. Women students of the Uni- 
versity. 

D. A. R.-May E. Talmadge Fund. Men and women students of the University. 

W. S. Denmark Fund. Men and women of the University. 

Druid Hills Methodist Memorial Educational Fund. The University. 

Eugene and Harry Dodd Fund. The University. 

Elbert County Dawson Fund. Men in the College of Agriculture whose 
homes are in Elbert County. 

J. C. Dukes Fund. Students from Terrell and Coweta Counties in the College 
of Agriculture, School of Home Economics, and College of Business Ad- 
ministration. 

Epsilon Sigma Phi Fund (Alpha Beta Chapter). The College of Agriculture. 

Exchange Club (Atlanta). The College of Agriculture. 

W. W. Findley Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Lucy Hurt Fisher Fund. Men and women in the College of Agriculture. 

Chas. W. Ford Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Forestry Loan Fund. The School of Forestry. 

Four-H Club Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Freshman Y Commissioner Fund. Freshman women of the University. 

Georgia-A. & W. P. Railroad Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Georgia Bankers' Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Georgia Bankers' Boys Club Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Georgia Bankers' Girls Club Fund. Junior and seniors in the School of 
Home Economics. 

Georgia Power Company Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Girls Canning Club Fund. Juniors and seniors in the School of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

James C. Harris Fund. Men and women students in the University. 

Frank Hawkins Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

A. L. Hull Memorial Fund. The University. 

J. H. Hunt Fund. Men and women students of the University, preferably 
from North Georgia. 

Mrs. Graham Johnson Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Bess D. Jones Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Junior League, Atlanta Fund. Juniors and seniors in the School of Home 
Economics. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 83 

Kirkwood P.-T. A. Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Charles L., Jr., and John King Loan Fund. Men students of the University. 

J. B. Keough Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Joseph Rucker Lamar Scholarship Fund. First to a student from Rich- 
mond Academy in Augusta, Georgia, for use at the University of Geor- 
gia; second, to other students in the state. 

Landscape Architecture Student Loan Fund. Students in Landscape Archi- 
tecture. 

Francis Eugene Lamer Fund. Juniors and seniors in the School of Home 
Economics. 

Francis A. Lipscomb Fund. The University. 

Arthur Lucas Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Joseph Henry Lumpkin Fund. The University. 

Mrs. P. C. McDuffie Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

McIntosh County Dawson Find. Juniors and seniors in the School of Home 
Economics whose homes are in Mcintosh County. 

Macon County Dawson Fund. Students of the College of Agriculture whose 
homes are in Macon County. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. 0. Marshall Fund. Men and women students of the Uni- 
versity. 

R. H. Martin Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Moina Michael Fund. (Given by the American Legion Auxiliary.) Sons 
and daughters or brothers and sisters of World War Veterans. 

Thos. E. Mitchell Fund. Men and women students of the University. 

University of Georgia Mitchell Fund. Men and women of the University. 

Coordinate Mitchell Fund. The Coordinate College. 

Georgia Tech Mitchell Fund. Students of Georgia Tech. (Write Georgia 
Tech.) 

G. S. C. W. Mitchell Fund. Students of G. S. C. W. (Write G. S. C. W.) 

Moon Loan Fund. Men and women students of the University. 

R. C. Neely Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

C. T. Nunnally Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

J. Carroll Payne Fund. Juniors and seniors in the School of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Phi Delta Phi Fund. Members of that fraternity. 

Benjamin Z. Phillips Fund. Members of the second-year law class. 

Albon W. Reed Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Bertha Rich Fund. Juniors and seniors in the School of Home Economics. 

E. Rivers Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Jas. D. Robinson Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

S. D. V. Fraternity Fund. The College of Agriculture. 

Sale City Dawson Fund. Men in the College of Agriculture from Sale City. 

John D. Simmons Fund. The College of Agriculture. 



84 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Hoke Smith Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Students Loan Fund. Men and women students of the University. 
Mark Sullivan Fund. Men and women students of the University. 
Berbyman Thompson Fund. Men and women from Coweta County. 
Meldrim Thompson Fund. Senior Law students of the University. 
Frances C. Tucker Fund. Women in the University. 
Leila Bates Tye Fund. Home Economics 4-H girls. 

Louis Wellhouse Memorial Fund. Men and women students of the Univer- 
sity. 
C. P. Whitehead Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Cecil Wilcox Loan Fund. Men students of the University. 
Robert W. Woodruff Fund. The College of Agriculture. 
Ida A. Young Fund. The Coordinate College. 

FOUNDATION LOAN FUNDS 

A number of Educational Loan Foundations outside the University lend 
money to deserving students on terms similar to those of the regular Uni- 
versity funds. Students may write these Foundations directly or be recom- 
mended by the Director of Student Aid of the University. Largest among 
these foundations are: 

Lewis H. Beck Foundation 
Mrs. Miriam W. Jenkins, Secretary, 1421 Candler Building, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Knights Templar Educational Foundation 

Mr. Thomas C. Law, Chairman, P. O. Box 1558, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Pickett and Hatcher Educational Foundation 

Mr. Guy E. Snavely, Jr., Executice Secretary, First National Bank Building, 
Columbus, Georgia. 

Rotary Educational Foundation of Atlanta 

Mr. Kendall Weisiger, Chairman, 603 Forsyth Building, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Student Aid Foundation of the Georgia Federation of Women's Clubs 

Mrs. C. T. Pottinger, Executive Secretary, 2475 Rivers Road, N. W., Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

John T. Hall Student Loan Fund 
Mr. Ray Wilhoit, Trust Company of Georgia, Atlanta, Georgia 

Many civic organizations and clubs throughout the cities of Georgia main- 
tain loan funds for local students. Students should make inquiry of these 
clubs. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

Besides the scholarships, honors, awards, and prizes open to University 
students, the office of the Dean of Students maintains a Bureau of Stu- 
dent Employment in its Office of Placement and Student Aid. One aim 
of this bureau is to assist students who find it necessary or desirable to earn 
a part of their college expenses. Work opportunities occur in the libraries, 
dining halls, dormitories, and in a few academic departments. A few jobs, 
formerly called student activity scholarships, are given to talented students 
who are capable of serving the University as leaders in various extra-curricu- 
lar activities. Some of the activities in which such students may engage are 
the University Band, Orchestra, and Debating Teams. 

It is very difficult to secure a job for a student before he arrives in Ath- 
ens. Employers usually insist on personal interviews. A student should 
come to the University prepared to pay all his expenses for at least the first 
quarter of his residence. 

Each year the bureau assists many students in finding jobs. A student 
should not expect, however, to be able to earn enough to pay all expenses. 
The regular academic program of the University provides a full load of work 
for the average student. A student who does any considerable amount of 
outside work will find it necessary to carry a reduced load of academic 
work and to spend a correspondingly longer time at the University. 

Students interested in part-time employment should write to the Director 
of Placement and Student Aid. 

Additional financial aid for graduate students will be found in the General 
Catalogue under Graduate School. 

PLACEMENT OF GRADUATES 

The Office of Placement and Student Aid undertakes to assist those 
who have been enrolled as students in securing business and professional 
positions and teacher appointments. The office is in constant touch with 
a large number of alumni and business organizations and school systems 
that are potential employers of University students. 

Any person, whether undergraduate or an alumnus, is eligible to register 
for placement assistance. All seniors and graduate students are urged to 
have a personal interview with the Director of Placement and Student Aid. 

In addition to the over-all campus placement service this office works 
very closely with the deans of the professional schools in aiding with the 
placement of their graduates. 

The Office of Placement also maintains a Camp Placement Bureau which 
assists students and graduates to locate jobs as counselors and assistants 
in summer camps. This service is particularly attractive to teachers whose 
schools do not have a summer sesssion. Students and graduates should get 
in touch with the Camp Placement Bureau if they are interested in camp 
work for the next summer. For placement information write to the Director 
of Placement and Student Aid. 



86 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

THE DIVISION OF GENERAL EXTENSION 

INQUIRIES 

All inquiries concerning the work of this Division should be addressed to 
the Director, Division of General Extension, The University of Georgia, Old 
College, Athens, Georgia. 

HISTORY 

The Division of General Extension was established in 1922 as the Division 
of Extension Teaching in the University. Prior to that time the extension 
activities of the University had been incidental and sporadic. Two years 
of growth and expansion resulted in the establishment of a Division of Uni- 
versity Extension. Special instructors were added to the staff and a Director 
was placed in charge. In 1932 the Division of General Extension of the Uni- 
versity System of Georgia was organized and the University office became 
a part of the system-wide division with offices in Atlanta. In 1947, the Board 
of Regents transferred the administration of the Division to the University of 
Georgia with offices again on the University campus. 

ORGANIZATION 

The Division of General Extension is a service division of the University 
System. It utilizes the resources of the entire University System, both human 
and physical, to take higher education to the people of the state. These 
services are rendered with the approval of the appropriate administrative and 
departmental heads and are directly supervised by the persons responsible for 
the work on the campus. Academic standards of the University are fully main- 
tained and students participating in extension activities receive the same 
amount of credit as do resident students for the same or equivalent work. 

CREDIT 

More and more emphasis in adult education is being placed on programs 
for which no college credit is anticipated. In line with current trends 
throughout the country the University of Georgia offers many courses for 
professional competency and general education in communities over the 
state. Where these courses parallel the work of classes on the campus Uni- 
versity credit may be earned and students may apply as much as forty-five 
quarter hours of such credit toward the bachelor degree. No graduate credit 
may be earned through the extension program. 

In-service teachers and students seeking degrees are advised to contact the 
dean of their college regarding course requirements. The Division of General 
Extension will make every effort to offer those courses of most value to stu- 
dents but cannot accept the responsibility for determining individual re- 
quirements for degrees or certificates. 

FEES 

Fees charged for extension class instruction, correspondence instruction, 
and off-campus center instruction are those ordinarily charged resident stu- 
dents at the University. Matriculation fee is $4.00 per quarter hour. Lab- 
oratory and registration fees are at the regular University rate. All fees 
are payable at the time of registration. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



United States Armed Forces Institute. Men and women on active duty 
in the defense program may continue their college work through correspond- 
ence study. 

Information about this program may be obtained from the Education Office 
at camp or from U. S. A. F. I. Headquarters, Madison 3, Wisconsin. 

VETERANS 

Veterans who qualify under Public Law 346 or Public Law 16 are eligible 
to participate in the program of the Division of General Extension. The Divi- 
sion offers the services of a trained adviser on veterans affairs for con- 
sultation. 

MAJOR FIELDS OF SERVICE 

Off-Campus Centers. In strategic Georgia communities Centers have been 
developed to promote adult education programs. Full time directors are 
available to work with citizens in all aspects of education beyond the high 
school level. The program is primarily designed to give evening instruction 
to students who work during the day and are unable to leave their home 
communities to attend college. The instruction is under the direct super- 
vision of the department concerned at the University of Georgia. Entrance 
requirements and fees are the same as those on the campus. 

A number of extra curricular programs in the arts and with business are 
conducted in cooperation with local groups. The pattern for these programs 
is established in most instances by the desire of the communities. 

Correspondence Study. Correspondence courses are developed and taught 
by regular members of the faculties of the four year institutions of the Uni- 
versity System. They are comparable in content to equivalent courses given 
on the campus. The outlines are designed to fill the definite needs of those 
who cannot attend regular University sessions. Resident students who wish 
to carry correspondence work in addition to their regular load must have the 
written permission of the dean of their college. 

Extension Classes. Each year the Division organizes and conducts exten- 
sion classes in communities throughout the state. Work done in these classes 
corresponds in class requirements and credit hours to that done in similar 
courses on the campus. These courses are outlined and wherever possible 
conducted by regular members of the University System faculties. The nature 
and number of courses given by extension class instruction are determined 
by the availability of competent instructional staff, the availability of li- 
brary, laboratory, and other physical facilities, and the location and number 
of persons desiring the course. While there are many courses that may be 
given profitably away from the campus, the final decision as to course 
offerings rests with the head of the department concerned. 

Film Library. The Division pioneered in the field of audio-visual material 
and today has one of the best educational film libraries in the southeast. 
As a service to the units of the University System, to other schools and col- 
leges, county agents, home demonstration agents, club and church groups, 
the Film Library offers more than 2,000 titles for distribution. Films are 
available in sound and silent 16mm size to units of the University System 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



and county and home demonstration agents for transportation charges. To 
all other users there is a nominal charge for service and insurance. The 
library is constantly adding films suitable for use by college groups or adult 
groups in all communities. 

Photographic Service. A modern, well-equipped photographic laboratory 
is maintained to make pictures for current news stories and research pro- 
jects, slides for classroom use, and other educational photographic services. 
Prints of University activities are made available to the public at a mini- 
mum charge. 

Conference, Institutes and Short Courses. The Division recognizes the 
growing demand in the field of adult education for short term, non-credit 
seminars and refresher courses. Members of the University System faculty 
and professional and business leaders have joined resources both on and off 
campus to provide the best and most up-to-date leadership in these programs. 
Among the programs presented during this year are: Georgia Accounting 
Institute, Georgia Student Art Conference, Small Business Seminars, State 
Drama Festival, Forums on Gerontology, Regional Industrial Development 
Conference, Institute on Modern Foreign Languages, Pharmacy Seminars, 
Speech Conference, and Short Course for Tax Officials. 

An experienced staff welcomes the opportunity to serve in planning and 
promoting such conferences to meet the growing educational needs of Georgia. 

Artists and Lecturers. Members of the University faculty and student 
body are available to community groups for concerts and lectures. Many 
service clubs have taken advantage of this opportunity in planning programs 
on music, art and contemporary affairs. Dr. C. Mildred Thompson, speaking 
on United Nations topics and Alfred H. Holbrook, Curator of the Georgia 
Museum of Art, as well as a number of foreign students on the campus have 
been particularly popular lecturers. 

Citizenship and United Nations Information. In cooperation with the 
Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Division 
handles a home study course for those who have applied for U. S. citizen- 
ship and are studying for their Federal Examination. By special appoint- 
ment of the United Nations Department of Public Information, the Division 
acts as United Nations Volunteer Educational Center and Voluntary Cor- 
respondent Speakers Unit for Georgia residents. Files of current and his- 
torical material on the United Nations are maintained; Loan Kits are avail- 
able for distribution throughout the state. 

OTHER UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 

SHORT COURSES, CONFERENCES, AND INSTITUTES 

The various colleges and schools of the University conduct short courses, 
conferences, and institutes for the purpose of assisting various groups of 
citizens to keep informed about the latest developments in their respective 
fields of interest. Some of these meetings are sponsored by business, pro- 
fessional, and social organizations. Members of the University faculty and 
outside specialists offer instruction in short courses and conduct lectures, 
demonstrations and conferences. Public announcement is made from time 



GENERAL INFORMATION 89 

to time regarding special programs of this type that will be held on the 
University Campus. 

Among the conferences sponsored by the College of Education are the 
Conference of Superintendents and School Administrators and the Rural 
Life Conference. For several years the Georgia Congress of Parents and 
Teachers has held a Parent-Teacher Institute at the University in June. 

For many years the School of Journalism and the Georgia Press Associa- 
tion have conducted during the month of February a Press Institute for 
the editors of the papers of the state. 

The College of Agriculture conducts Short Courses for the citizens of 
Georgia as a definite part of its instructional program. These courses are 
normally given during the winter months. They deal with any subject- 
matter related to agriculture in which there is a popular interest. An- 
nouncements will be mailed to anyone on request. 

Other short meetings held at the University are the Woman's Club Insti- 
tute, the Garden Club Institute, and the conference for those engaged in 
insurance work. 

The University is glad to cooperate with any organization or group in 
planning a conference or institute that will fill a worthwhile need. Com- 
munications regarding such matters should be addressed to The Division of 
General Extension, University of Georgia. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA PRESS 

The University of Georgia Press was established in 1939. One of its pur- 
poses is to advance learning and disseminate knowledge by the publication 
of books that in their content and presentation contribute to a better under- 
standing of human affairs. Another purpose is to encourage creative literary 
and scientific work by providing facilities for the publication of the results 
of such work. The University Press is glad to consider for publication 
not only the work of University professors but the productions of scholars 
throughout the nation. A Board of Directors appointed by the Board of 
Regents and an Advisory Faculty Committee appointed by the President of 
the University control the publishing policies and supervise the work of 
the University Press. 

MlMEOGKAPHI N < 5 

Another service offered by the Press is mimeographing, available to de- 
partments and organizations of the University. 

For information regarding the Publications or work of the University 
Press, communications should be addressed to Director of the University 
of Georgia Press, Athens, Georgia. A list of the publications of the Press 
will be sent on request. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

The University of Georgia conducts a complete program of intercollegiate 
athletics. The University is a member of the Southeastern Athletic Con- 
ference and abides strictly by the regulations and policies of the conference. 
Although the University Faculty has general control of internal policies of 



90 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

the University relating to all phases of intercollegiate athletics, the Univer- 
sity of Georgia Athletic Association has been created to facilitate the handling 
of the business and financial side of the intercollegiate program. The Presi- 
dent of the University is ex-officio chairman of the Board of Directors and 
a majority of the members of the Board are faculty members. The other 
members of the Board are alumni and friends of the University. 

The funds of the Athletic Association are subject to the control of the 
Board of Regents. 

ALUMNI SOCIETY 

The University of Georgia Alumni Society was organized in 1834 and has 
been continuously active since that time. Its purpose is to keep former 
students of the University interested in and in touch with one another 
and also to encourage former students to manifest a continued interest in 
the University. 

All persons who at any time were matriculated as regular students in 
the University at Athens are members of the Society. A member who con- 
tributes annually to the Alumni Fund has the privilege of voting on all 
business matters, is eligible for election as an officer in the Society, and 
receives a subscription to the Alumni Record, a monthly magazine about 
alumni and campus activities. Students are invited to visit the Alumni 
Office, to confer with the secretary, and to learn about the general work 
of the Society. 

The government of the Society is in the hands of a Board of Managers 
elected by the active members of the Society. Officers of the Society are 
elected annually. "Alumni Day," the time for class reunions and other 
alumni celebrations, is held each year at Commencement. 

The business offices of the Alumni Society are on the second floor of the 
Academic Building, and are under the direction of William M. Crane, Jr., 
Alumni Secretary. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA FOUNDATION 

In 1937 the Alumni Society through its officers sponsored the organiza- 
tion of the University of Georgia Foundation. The Foundation is a cor- 
poration under the laws of the State of Georgia and has a self-perpetuating 
Board of Trustees. The Board consists of thirty-five alumni, elected from 
various sections of the state. 

The purposes of the University Foundation are to develop the facilities 
of the University and to strengthen its financial resources by encouraging 
gifts for the benefit of the University and also to receive, hold, and adminis- 
ter such gifts in accordance with the instructions of the donors. The Board 
of Trustees of the University Foundation is particularly interested in re- 
ceiving donations and bequests which will enable it to make financial pro- 
vision for University needs other than those that are adequately met by 
state appropriations. 

The officers of the University of Georgia Foundation at the present time 
are Dr. Phinizy Calhoun, President; Mr. Walter S. Cothran, Vice President; 
Mr. Hughes Spalding, Secretary; and Mr. Cam D. Dorsey, Treasurer. Informa- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 91 

tion regarding the Foundation may be obtained from Hughes Spalding, 
Secretary, Trust Company of Georgia Building, Atlanta, or from the President 
of the University. 

THE M. G. MICHAEL AWARD FOR RESEARCH BY FACULTY MEMBERS 
OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

This award for research by some faculty member of the College of Arts 
and Sciences was created in 1944 by Leroy and David Michael in honor of 
their father, Moses G. Michael, a graduate of the class of 1878. The fund 
is administered by the University of Georgia Foundation. The annual award 
amounts to $500. The corpus is being increased from time to time by the 
Michael brothers. 

THE ARTHUR LUCAS MEMORIAL FUND 

Established in 1946 by Mrs. Margaret C. Lucas, Atlanta, as a memorial to 
her late husband, this fund is to encourage research and study in the re- 
cording, projecting, and transmission of images, pictures, and sound by 
scientific means. This fund, the corpus of which is now $15,000.00, is ad- 
ministered by the University of Georgia Foundation. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

HISTORICAL 

Although the first statutes of the University contemplated resident grad- 
uate students, it was the custom here (as it was elsewhere) to confer the 
degree of Master of Arts upon any Bachelor of Arts of good character who, 
three years or more after graduation, should formally apply for the degree 
and pay a fee therefor. In 1868 a course of study was laid down which 
candidates for the master's degree were to pursue. From 1869 until 1890 
the regulations required the candidate to complete successfully the most 
advanced course in each of the academic (non-professional) schools. In 
1892 the requirements for the degrees became substantially the same as 
they are now, though slight modifications have been made from time to time. 

Prior to 1910 the graduate work of the University was supervised by the 
faculty, chiefly through its committee on Graduate Courses. In 1910. the 
Board of Trustees set the work apart by the creation of the Graduate 
School and the appointment of its first dean. 

ADMISSION 

A prospective applicant for admission to the Graduate School should se- 
cure from the office of the Dean of the Graduate School blanks to be used 
in applying for general admission to the University of Georgia and specific 
admission to the Graduate School. These applications should be completed 
and returned to this office at least six weeks before the opening of the 
quarter in which the student desires to register. Two official transcripts of 
all courses taken by the applicant in college or university must be sent direct 
from the Registrar. These transcripts provide information necessary to the 
dean and the major professor, and must be in their hands before the admis- 
sion of the student may become final. 

Graduates of institutions accredited by the appropriate regional accredit- 
ing agency may be admitted to the Graduate School upon the presentation 
of a certificate of graduation and an official transcript of all courses taken. 
Graduates from non-accredited institutions may be admitted to the Univer- 
sity as unclassified post-graduates and may later be admitted to full grad- 
uate standing on a basis of examinations and course work designed to indi- 
cate their degree of fitness for regular graduate study. 

The University reserves the right to require, in addition to the qualifica- 
tions for admission already stated, any tests or special work deemed ad- 
visable by the faculty in the interest of quality of work in the Graduate 
School. 

The registration of all students in the University who are graduates of 
standard colleges must be administered by the Dean of the Graduate School, 
regardless of what courses these students are taking, unless such students 
are candidates for another bachelor's degree. 

Students whose credentials justify their admission to graduate standing 
will be classified as graduate students and will be eligible to become candi- 

[ 92] 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 93 



dates for graduate degrees upon the satisfactory completion of preliminary 
requirements. Students whose scholastic records are not such as will justify 
their admission to graduate status will be placed in the general University 
classification of irregular students. No irregular student will be permitted 
to register for graduate courses and no work taken by him while under this 
classification may be counted for credit toward any graduate degree. 

Should the work of the irregular student prove to be of such quality as 
to justify his admission to graduate status, reconsideration may be given 
to his application for admission at any time after he has completed fifteen 
quarter hours of work following his original application and has taken the 
Graduate Record Examination. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not imply admission to candidacy 
for a degree. The requirements for admission to candidacy are stated else- 
where in this bulletin. 

MASTERS' DEGREES 

The masters' degrees now conferred by the University are Master of Arts, 
Master of Arts in Journalism, Master of Science, Master of Science in Agri- 
culture, Master of Science in Agricultural Engineering, Master of Science 
in Business Administration, Master of Science in Chemistry, Master of 
Science in Education, Master of Science in Forestry, Master of Science in 
Home Economics, Master of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Agriculture, 
Master of Business Administration, Master of Education, Master of Fine 
Arts, Master of Forestry, Master of Home Economics, Master of Laws, and 
Master of Music Education. 

Master of Arts. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science. The major and at least one minor must be made up of courses 
selected from the following departments of study: Economics, English, Geog- 
raphy, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Modern Languages, 
Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 

Note: In individual cases a professional degree may be accepted as the 
prerequisite degree for a Master of Arts or a Master of Science degree, pro- 
vided the student's undergraduate program has met certain requirements 
of liberal as well as technical courses. 

Master of Arts in Journalism. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism from an accredited institution and the neces- 
sary undergraduate courses in journalism. The major study must be in 
journalism; one minor should be chosen from the social sciences and one 
minor from English. 

Master of Science. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Science or Bach- 
elor of Arts. The major and at least one minor must be made up of courses 
selected from the following departments of study: Astronomy, Bacteriology, 
Botany, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Physiology, Psychology, Zoology. 

Master of Science in Agriculture. An approved baccalaureate degree is 
prerequisite. The major and at least one minor must be selected from 
courses offered in the College of Agriculture. One minor may be chosen 
from graduate courses offered in other departments of the University. 



94 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Master of Science in Agbicultubal Engineering. Prerequisite: Bachelor 
of Science in Agricultural Engineering. The major study must be in the 
Department of Agricultural Engineering. Minors are to be selected with 
distinct reference to the major. 

Master of Science in Agricultural Engineering. Prerequisite: Bachelor 
of Science in Agricultural Engineering. The major study must be in the 
Department of Agricultural Engineering. Minors are to be selected with 
distinct reference to the major. 

Master of Science in Business Administration. Prerequisite degree: 
Bachelor of Business Administration, or its equivalent. The requirements for 
this degree are the completion of a major of four courses, two minors of two 
courses each, and a thesis. The major and one minor must be chosen from 
the graduate courses in business administration and economics. One of the 
minors may be taken in a related field. 

Master of Science in Chemistry. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Science 
in Chemistry or its approximate equivalent. For students who hold as- 
sistantships, this degree will require a minimum of two years of graduate 
work, the second year being devoted in large part to research. 

A student will be admitted to candidacy for this degree only after he has 
shown a reading knowledge of both French and German and after he has 
passed preliminary written, and possibly oral examinations given by the 
Department of Chemistry. These examinations cover in a general way the 
divisions of inorganic, organic, analytical, and physical chemistry. The 
written examination on these four fields will constitute the student's final 
written examination. Any student who fails to pass the examination on 
two of these divisions or who fails to pass any re-examination will be re- 
quested to withdraw his application for admission to candidacy for this 
degree. The final oral examination is given after the thesis has been ap- 
proved. It is primarily a defense of the thesis. 

The degree of Master of Science in Chemistry is for those students who 
intend to follow chemistry as a profession, especially for those who expect 
to continue their studies toward the doctorate in chemistry. It, therefore, 
differs from the degree of Master of Science with a major in chemistry by 
being more professional in character. 

Master of Science in Education. The minimum requirement for the de- 
gree of Master of Science in Education is the completion of an approved pro- 
gram, residence to the extent of one academic year, and a thesis based upon 
data secured from original source material. At least one minor must be taken 
in a field other than Education. Candidates for this degree must complete 
for credit Education 816, Methods and Applications of Educational Research. 
The student should seek the advice of the Chairman of the Division of Grad- 
uate Studies of the College of Education in determining the suitability of 
this degree program to his educational purposes. 

Master of Science in Forestry. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Science 
in Forestry or Forest Engineer. The major courses must be in Forestry; 
one minor may be selected from any department of the College of Agricul- 
ture and one minor from any other department or college of the University. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 95 



Master of Science in Home Economics. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor 
of Science in Home Economics or its equivalent. The major study must be 
in home economics and one minor may also be taken in that school. Minors 
will be selected with distinct reference to the major. 

Master of Science in Pharmacy. Prerequisite: Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy degree from this University, or must have had equivalent training 
at some other institution accredited by the American Council on Pharma- 
ceutical Education. A student will be admitted to candidacy for this degree 
only after he has passed preliminary written or oral examinations given by 
the School of Pharmacy. These examinations cover in a general way the 
divisions of pharmacy, pharmaceutical analysis, pharmacology and organic 
medicinal chemistry. 

Master of Agriculture. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Science in Agri- 
culture, or equivalent degree. The minimum requirement for this degree is 
an approved program of study carrying sixty quarter-hours' credit with four 
quarters of residence. The course work must be done in three or more de- 
partments of the College with a maximum of four 5-hour courses in any 
one department, the course 921 being one of these four courses. The pro- 
gram will include a comprehensive paper based upon a survey of the litera- 
ture dealing with the chosen phase of the student's program. A maximum 
of five quarter-hours' credit may be allowed for this written report. 

This degree program is designed to meet the vocational needs of persons 
engaging in general agricultural pursuits such as that of agricultural science 
teachers in the public schools, county agents, farm administration personnel, 
and others. It is considered to be a professional degree in general agricul- 
ture and is not available to persons seeking concentration in a particular 
department of the College of Agriculture. 

Master of Business Administration. Prerequisite degree: An approved 
baccalaureate degree. The minimum requirement for the professional degree 
of Master of Business Administration is an approved program of sixty quar- 
ter hours of graduate courses, and a residence requirement of four quarters. 
Students holding a Bachelor of Business Administration degree usually can 
qualify for the degree by meeting the minimum requirements. Students 
holding a baccalaureate degree in other fields will be required to take from 
five to forty quarter hours additional work in business or economics courses, 
depending upon the applicant's previous training. 

Candidates for this degree must complete for credit a minimum of fifteen 
quarter hours in courses numbered 800. At least forty-five hours of the 
student's graduate program must be in the field of economics and business 
administration. 

Master of Education. The minimum requirement for the degree of Master 
of Education is an approved program, including eleven courses (fifty-five 
quarter hours), and a residence requirement of thirty-six weeks. At least 
three of the courses in the student's program must be in fields other than 
Education. Candidates for this degree must complete for credit the two fol- 
lowing required courses: Education 826, Critique of Educational Literature; 
and Education 921, Laboratory in Applied Education. There is no thesis 
requirement for this degree. 



96 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The degree of Master of Education is designed for students whose voca- 
tional objectives do not call for rigorous training in research procedures but 
presuppose a background of professional training. The student should seek 
the advice of the Chairman of the Division of Graduate Studies of the Col- 
lege of Education in determining the suitability of this degree program to 
his educational purposes. 

Master of Pine Arts. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Fine Arts or the 
equivalent. This degree is offered to majors in Art and in Music. In Art, 
emphasis will be placed on a high degree of technical and artistic accom- 
plishment. The candidate must have a general knowledge of art history and 
criticism. Upon the recommendation of the staff, a creative project of high 
quality may be accepted in place of a written thesis. The required time for the 
completion of the program leading to this degree is from four to six quarters. 
In Music, the student may select composition, musicology, or applied music 
as his or her special field. A written thesis or an acceptable large compo- 
sition must be presented, besides the regular 40 hours required. 

Master of Forestry. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Science in Fores- 
try or equivalent degree. The minimum requirements for the degree of Mas- 
ter of Forestry is an approved program to include twelve 5-hour courses, 
or their equivalent (60 hour total), with a minimum residence requirement 
of four quarters. Candidates for this degree must complete four 5-hour 
courses as a major in forestry, so selected as to form a logical whole, 
and Forestry 921, Applied Forestry Problems. At least fifteen additional 
hours must be in fields related to forestry. There is no thesis requirement 
for this degree. 

Master of Home Economics. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Science in 
Home Economics or its equivalent. The minimum requirement for the degree 
of Master of Home Economics is an approved program including eleven 
courses (55 quarter hours) and residence of four quarters. At least two of 
the courses in the student's program must be in fields other than Home Eco- 
nomics. A major of at least four courses must be taken in a selected field in 
Home Economics. In addition to the major, courses should include Research 
Methods in the major field and Home Economics 921, Problems in Home 
Economics. The student must present an approved written report of the 
field work problem. 

Master of Laws. Prerequisite degree: Bachelor of Laws from an approved 
school of law of quality indicating that graduate work may be pursued with 
profit. At least one academic year of full-time study is required, the thesis 
and not less than one-half of the student's course work being in the general 
field of law. The program for the degree provides opportunity for the stu- 
dent to specialize in a chosen field or to deepen his knowledge of law gen- 
erally. 

Master of Music Education. Prerequisite degree: An approved bacca- 
laureate degree. The minimum requirement for the Master of Music Edu- 
cation degree is an approved program of study which includes forty-five 
quarter hours of course work and ten hours in Applied Problems in Music. 
At least four quarters of residence will be required. A general musicianship 
examination must be passed during the last quarter of work. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 97 



This degree program is a program of study offered jointly by the faculties 
of the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Education. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

1. Admission to Candidacy. The conditions governing admission to the 
Graduate School have been stated. Admissions to the Graduate School does 
not imply that the work taken by the student must be credited toward a 
degree. Admission to candidacy for a Master of Arts or Master of Science 
degree in any field is based upon the following requirements: 

A. Approval by the Graduate Faculty of the general undergraduate train- 
ing of the student as shown by an official transcript of his college 
work. 

B. Certification by the student's major department that 

(1) all prerequisites for major and minor courses have been completed, 

(2) the Graduate Record Examination has been taken and all other 
requisite preliminary examinations have been passed, 

(3) foreign language requirements for the desired degree have been 
met, and 

(4) the student has demonstrated his ability to do work of graduate 
character in the field of his choice. 

C. The presentation of an outline of his program of study which has the 
approval of his major professor, the head of his major department, and 
the Dean of the Graduate School. 

D. Approval of the problem and plan of work proposed as a basis for his 
thesis. 

Application for admission to candidacy must be filed with the Dean of the 
Graduate School before the first day of classes of the final quarter of full 
residence. Failure of the student to comply with this regulation will in no 
case be regarded as excusable. 

2. Program. Assuming all prerequisites to have been met, the require- 
ments for a Master of Arts or Master of Science degree in any field are the 
satisfactory completion of a program of study which consists of courses carry- 
ing a minimum credit value of 40 quarter-hours plus the writing of an ac- 
ceptable thesis. The courses taken must form a major (20 quarter-hours) 
and two minors (10 quarter-hours each) so chosen as to form a logical whole. 
All courses included in the major must be taken in one department. Both 
minors may be taken in departments other than that of the major, and at 
least one of these must be outside the department of the major. The pro- 
gram of study must not include any course that forms a part of the stu- 
dent's program of study for any other degree. It must be approved in 
advance by the major professor, the head of the department, and the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

3. Thesis. A thesis required for the master's degree must be based upon 
primary source materials relating to some problem within the field of the 
major. It must show independence of judgment and correctness and good 
taste in the use of English. Due acknowledgment of the work of others 
must be made, and an accurate bibliography of all literature used must be 



98 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

included. The research of the student and the preparation of his thesis 
must be under the direction of a member of the Graduate Faculty, who is 
designated as his major professor. This person is also responsible for the 
planning of his program of study. 

In each department where it is offered, the thesis carries the number 930 
and it may carry from 5 to 50 quarter hours of credit, depending upon the 
amount of work devoted to it by the student. This credit must be in addition 
to the regular course credit requirement of forty (40) hours for the master's 
degree. 

The thesis must be written, approved by the major professor, and placed 
in the hands of the Dean of the Graduate School at least three weeks before 
the date of graduation. Two bound copies of the thesis must be deposited 
with the University Library and one bound copy with the student's major 
department before the degree is granted. These copies must contain the 
written approval of the major professor, the members of the final reading 
committee, and the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Information concerning the form to be followed in the writing of the 
thesis may be secured from the office of the Dean of the Graduate School. 

4. Required Standing. An average of B T must be maintained on the 
total program used to satisfy degree requirements, and no grade below C will 
be accepted. 

5. Language Requirements. All candidates for graduate degrees are ex- 
pected to show correctness and good taste in their use of English, both 
written and oral. A reading knowledge of French or German is required 
of all candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master 
of Science in Business Administration, Master of Science in Pharmacy, Master 
of Fine Arts, and Master of Arts in Journalism. Upon the recommendation 
of the major professor, Spanish or Italian may be used to fulfill the lan- 
guage requirement for the Master of Arts, Master of Science in Business 
Administration, Master of Arts in Journalism, and Master of Fine Arts de- 
grees. A reading knowledge of both French and German is required of candi- 
dates for degree of Master of Science in Chemistry. 

6. Examinations. In addition to all examinations required for admission 
to candidacy and all written examinations in the courses taken, the candi- 
date must pass an oral examination covering graduate major, minors, and 
thesis. This examination is conducted by a committee appointed by the Dean 
of the Graduate School. This examination is open to any member of the 
faculty who may desire to attend. 

7. Residence. The minimum residence requirement for the master's de- 
gree is one academic year, or three full quarters. 

8. Time Limit. All work credited toward the master's degree must be 
completed within six years. 

9. Graduate Work Transferred. Credit may be given for work done in 
a graduate school of good standing when proper credentials have been pre- 
sented. Such credit, however, will not exceed one minor, or ten quarter- 
hours, and will not decrease the residence requirement to less than thirty- 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 99 



three weeks for the Master of Education degree and thirty weeks for all 
other master's degrees. 

10. Extension and Correspondence. No work done in extension or by 
correspondence will be credited toward the master's degree. 

11. Application for Graduation. The candidate for a master's degree 
must file with the Dean of the Graduate School an application for graduation. 
This application must be filed at the beginning of the quarter in which the 
candidate expects to be graduated. It must be accompanied by a receipt 
showing that the candidate has paid his diploma fee of $10. 

12. Attendance upon Graduation Exercises. A candidate for a degree, 
unless excused in writing by the Secretary of the Faculty, must attend the 
graduation exercises at which he expects a degree to be conferred upon him. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

The University has established this degree for the purpose of providing 
properly qualified students with the opportunity to pursue research and other 
scholarly activity beyond the point that is possible in programs for the 
master's degree. At present, opportunity for such advanced graduate work 
is provided in only English, mathematics and zoology. Other fields will be 
added from time to time as conditions seem to justify it. An applicant 
who is looking forward to work at this level should communicate with the 
Dean of the Graduate School in advance with reference to the possibility 
of pursuing work in the field of his choice. 

This degree will not be granted upon the completion of any definite 
amount of work prescribed in advance. It will be granted in recognition of 
proficiency in research, breadth and soundness of scholarship, and thorough 
acquaintance with a specific field of knowledge. Evidence of such attain- 
ment must be demonstrated through the presentation of an acceptable thesis 
based upon independent research and through the satisfactory passing of 
such written and oral examinations as may be prescribed. 

Admission to Advanced Graduate Study. A student will be permitted 
to register for advanced graduate courses or undertake research, provided 
the Graduate Faculty is satisfied that he is a person of proper attainment 
and promise and provided the desired courses can be adequately given or 
the research adequately supported and directed. No course taken or other 
work done will be credited toward the Doctor of Philosophy degree until 
the applicant has been formally admitted to candidacy for that degree. 

Advisory Committee. When a student signifies his desire to work toward 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the Dean of the Graduate School will ap- 
point a committee of three to act as his advisers for the period of his study. 
The members of this committee will assist him in outlining his program, in 
choosing a subject for his dissertation, and in all other matters connected 
with his studies. The chairman of this committee will be his major pro- 
fessor. 

Residence. The degree cannot be secured through summer work alone. 
At least three consecutive quarters must be spent in resident study on this 



100 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

campus. If the student holds a part-time assistantship or has other part-time 
duties, the residence requirement will be increased sufficiently to provide 
equivalence to three quarters of full-time study in residence. 

Majors axd Minors. The program of course work of the candidate should 
be submitted during the first year of his work as a prospective candidate 
for the Ph.D. degree and must include a major, and at least one minor out- 
side the field of the major. This program will require for its satisfactory 
completion at least three years of study. All requirements for the degree, 
except the thesis and the final oral examination, must be completed within 
a period of six years. This minimum time requirement is figured from the 
date of admission of the student as a perspective candidate for the Ph.D. 
degree. 

Preliminary Examination. The satisfactory passing of a formal prelim- 
inary examination is required of the student before admission to candidacy. 
This examination is given by a committee appointed by the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

Foreign Languages. A reading knowledge of French and German will be 
required of each candidate for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. This re- 
quirement must be satisfied before the student is admitted to candidacy. 

Admission to Candidacy. A studer.t may be admitted to candidacy for 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy upon (1) approval by the Graduate 
{faculty of his background training as represented by official transcripts 
and other evidence; (2) certification by the student's major department that 
all prerequisite and supporting courses for the major and minors have been 
completed, all required preliminary examinations have been passed, foreign 
language requirements have been met, and the student has demonstrated 
scholarship of a high character, independence of thought and ability in pro- 
ductive work: and (3) the presentation of a program of study and research 
which has the approval of his Advisory Committee, his major department, 
and the Dean of the Graduate School. Admission to candidacy must be upon 
formal application filed with the Dean of the Graduate School not later than 
one academic year before the proposed date of graduation. 

No member of the faculty of the University of Georgia above the rank of 
Instructor may become a candidate for a doctor's degree at the University. 

Dissertation. Each candidate for the doctorate must present a disserta- 
tion, or thesis, on some subject connected with his major field of study. 
The dissertation must give evidence of originality in research, independent 
thinking, scholarly ability, and technical mastery of some field. Its conclu- 
sions must be logical, its literary form must be good, and its contribution to 
knowledge should merit publication. In general, the dissertation will require 
the equivalent of at least one year in its preparation. 

At least four weeks before the time of the student's graduation, three 
typewritten copies of the dissertation, together with an abstract not ex- 
ceeding 1.500 words, must be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School for 
the use of the examining committee. When the dissertation has been finally 
approved, three bound typewritten copies must be handed to the Dean of 
the Graduate School — two for the Library and one for the Department. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 101 



Each copy must have a certificate of approval signed by the major professor, 
the members of the examining committee, and the dean. 

One hundred and fifty copies of the published dissertation, or approved 
portions thereof, must be presented to the University. In case it is not 
practicable to publish before graduation, the candidate must deposit fifty 
dollars with the Treasurer of the University to insure publication. This 
amount will be refunded in case the dissertation is published within three 
years after the degree is conferred. 

Final Examination. When the professor in charge of a candidate's pro- 
gram and dissertation report that the dissertation has been accepted and 
that all other requirements of his program have been successfully com- 
pleted, the candidate will be given an oral examination upon the disserta- 
tion and the general field of the major and minor subjects. 

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION 

Requibements. In general, the requirements for the Doctor of Education 
degree are the same as those for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. In 
exceptional cases, however, some modification of the foreign language re- 
quirement may be allowed where conditions seem to justify it. Any such 
modification must have the specific approval of the Executive Committee of 
the Graduate Faculty. The Graduate Faculty may, in individual cases, also 
make such modification of the residence requirement as seems necessary 
to meet the need for approved field work. 

The dissertation required for the degree of Doctor of Education will em- 
phasize the intelligent application of research techniques to the solution 
of a problem connected with educational practice, and it is the most im- 
portant single requirement for the degree. It is intended to show the candi- 
date's ability to conduct an independent investigation based upon source 
materials growing out of practical educational problems in his field. The 
subject chosen must be definite and of limited range, the method of in- 
vestigation must be formulated with exactness, the sources that are em- 
ployed must be properly evaluated, and the conclusions must be well sup- 
ported. 

Candidates for this degree must have the personal qualities necessary for 
success in their profession, must have had a broad background of training, 
and must have had at least two years of successful experience in the teach- 
ing profession. A candidate who is securing training for administration 
should include a minor in the social sciences; one who is training for 
teaching should have a minor in the subject matter field in which he pro- 
poses to teach. 

The Graduate School will admit to candidacy for this degree only those 
students who give promise of the power to do original and creative work 
on educational problems of major and lasting significance. 



102 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

FELLOWSHIPS, ASSISTANTSHIPS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

A limited number of qualified graduates may be given financial assistance 
in the form of fellowships or assistantships while pursuing advanced work 
leading to higher degrees. The recipients of such aid are expected to 
render certain services to the University. It is expected that holders of 
fellowships or assistantships will not engage in any other employment for 
remuneration while holding such fellowships or assistantships. 

Application blanks and information on all fellowships, assistantships, and 
scholarships may be obtained from the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Applications must be filed not later than the first day of March preceding 
the academic year in which the student expects to register in the Graduate 
School. 

Fellowships. Graduate fellows are selected by the faculty of the Graduate 
School on a basis of merit and with due consideration of the opportunity 
which the University is in position to afford them. They must be registered 
in the Graduate School and their work toward the advanced degree must at 
all times be of satisfactory character. 

Persons holding fellowships are expected to assist faculty members in 
their major departments to an extent not exceeding six hours per week. 
They will not be placed in charge of organized class work or laboratories, 
and they will be permitted to carry a full load of study. The fellowship 
carries a stipend of $800 per year. 

Students who desire to apply for graduate fellowships should present 
their applications to the Dean of the Graduate School directly, or through 
the department in whcih they propose to take major work. 

Assistants. Graduate assistantships are classified in two groups 
depending upon the amount of assistance that the student is expected to 
render. The third-time assistantship carries a stipend of $1000.00, and the 
fourth-time assistantship carries a stipend of $800.00 per year. The assistant 
will be expected to assist with the work of his major department, but he will 
not be placed in charge of classes or laboratories. The third-time assistant 
will be limited to ten hours of academic work each quarter, and the fourth- 
time assistant will be limited to twelve to thirteen hours. 

Graduate assistantships are assigned by departments. Applications for 
such assistantships should be made directly to the department in which the 
student expects to take his major work. 

Research Assistantships. A limited number of research assistantships are 
open to graduate students who are qualified to assist faculty members in 
their research. The stipends carried by these assistantships vary in amount 
on a basis of the technical experience of the assistant and the work required 
of him. Applications for these assistantships should be filed with the de- 
partment in which the student proposes to work. The head of this depart- 
ment will transmit the application to the Dean of the Graduate School with 
the departmental recommendation. 

The amount of graduate work that may be carried by the research assistant 
will depend upon the amount of work required of him under his assistant- 
ship. If a third of his time is required, he may carry two 5-hour courses 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 103 



for graduate credit. If as much as two-thirds of his time is required in the 
work of his assistantship, he will be permitted to carry only one 5-hour 
course. 

Teaching Assistantships. The University provides a few teaching assist- 
antships that are open to students who hold the master's degree or its equiva- 
lent. The assistantships carry stipends ranging from $600 to $1,200 per 
year, depending upon the experience and the amount of teaching required 
of the assistant. The Dean of the Graduate School will be glad to refer to 
the proper department any applications for teaching assistantships. 

The amount of graduate work that may be carried by the teaching as- 
sistant will depend upon the amount of teaching required of him. If his 
teaching load is as much as five hours, he will be permitted to carry only 
two 5-hour graduate courses. Increase of his teaching load beyond that 
point will result in a corresponding decrease in the amount of graduate 
work which he may take. 

Phelps-Stokes Graduate Scholarship. Miss Caroline Phelps-Stokes has 
given to the University the sum of $12,500 with the stipulation that the in- 
come is to be awarded annually as a graduate scholarship. The holder of this 
scholarship must pursue studies under the direction of one of the following 
departments: economics, education, history, or sociology. He must make 
a scientific study of the Xegro and his adjustment to American civilization. 
The value of this scholarship at present is $500 a year out of which the 
student must pay the usual matriculation fee and such additional fees as 
are regularly required. 

Henry L. Richmond Graduate Scholarship. Mrs. Henry L. Richmond 
of Savannah has given the University a fund of $25,000. A portion of the 
income from this fund is used to provide scholarships in the Department of 
Chemistry. One or more scholarships of $500 each are available each year. 

Martin Reynolds Smith Fund. By the gift of $2,000, Mr. J. Warren Smith 
has established this fund in memory of his son, Martin Reynolds Smith. 
The interest from this investment is to be used as prizes for excellence 
in research in chemistry. 

Wildlife Conservation Fellowships. Through the State Game and Fish 
Commission, special fellowships are available to majors in biology for grad- 
uate work in vertebrate ecology. The theses of students holding these fellow- 
ships will be directed toward problems in fisheries biology and wild life con- 
servation. 

RESEARCH PROGRAM AT THE OAK RIDGE 
INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR STUDIES 

The University of Georgia is one of the Sponsoring Universities of the 
Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 
Through this cooperative association with the Institute, our Graduate School 
has at its disposal the facilities of the National Laboratories in Oak Ridge 
and of the research staffs of these laboratories. When the masters' or doc- 
toral candidate has completed his resident work here, it is possible, by special 
arrangement for him to go to Oak Ridge to do his research problem and 
prepare his thesis. Such transfer of the student to the Oak Ridge National 



104 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Laboratories must be initiated through the recommendation of his major 
professor, and the thesis done there must be recommended by him for ac- 
ceptance here. 

Students may go to Oak Ridge on Oak Ridge Graduate Fellowships which 
have varying stipends determined by the number of dependents they have 
and the level of work that they are doing. 

A copy of the Bulletin and Announcement of the Graduate Training Pro- 
gram of the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies is available in the office 
of the Dean of the Graduate School. Should you be interested, ask for this 
Bulletin at his office. If you prefer, you may request a Bulletin by writing 
to the Chairman of the University Relations Division of the Oak Ridge Insti- 
tute of Nuclear Studies, Box 117, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 

All arrangements for these fellowships will be made between the Dean of 
the Graduate School and the Institute. 

In addition to the possibilities that are open to the students members of 
our faculty may also be accepted for research appointments, usually not less 
than three months in duration, in the Oak Ridge National Laboratories. 
These appointments carry stipends commensurate with those which the staff 
members would receive here. Through the Oak Ridge Institute, therefore, 
both our staff and our students are enabled to keep abreast of the most 
modern developments in atomic and nuclear research. 

EXPENSES 

Residents of Georgia pay a fee of $180.00 per academic year of three 
quarters, payable $60.00 at the beginning of each quarter. Non-residents pay 
an additional amount of $100 per quarter. Room, board and laundry will 
vary from $145 to $160 per quarter. Books may be estimated at $45 per 
year. The total estimated expenses will be about $700 to $850 per year. 

All students are required to take the Graduate Record Examination before 
they are admitted to candidacy for a graduate degree. The fee for students 
taking this examination under the Institutional Plan (scheduled for regu- 
larly enrolled students) is $3.00. For students taking the examination under 
the Independent Plan (scheduled primarily for undergraduates and others 
anticipating graduate work at some other institution) the fee is $10.00. 

Candidates for the master's degree must pay a $10.00 diploma fee at the 
beginning of the quarter of graduation. A student must register for the 
thesis and pay the regular fee for one 5-hour course. 

A candidate for the doctor's degree must pay a $25.00 diploma fee at least 
ten days before graduation. This fee covers cost of both the diploma and 
the hood. One who has completed his course and is registered for the doctor's 
dissertation only must pay a fee of at least $15 per quarter, the exact amount 
of the fee to be fixed by his advisory committee. 



THE FRANKLIN COLLEGE OF ARTS 
AND SCIENCES 

Sidney Walter Martin, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Dean. 
Pauline Martin Henry, A.B., Assistant to the Dean. 
Joyce Annette Hardy, Secretary. 



Jules Cesar Alciatore, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of French. 

James Wagner Alexander, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Classics 

and Head of the Department of Classics. 
♦John Fletcher Allums, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political 

Science. 
Eulala L. Amos, B.S.Ed., M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 
*John Hilmer Anderson, B.M., M.M., Assistant Professor of Music. 
James Whitmore Andrews, B.A., M.F.A., Temporary Assistant Professor of 

Drama. 
Mary Jane Appleby, A.B., M.A., Instructor in English. 
Joseph Thomas Askew, Ph.B., M.A., LL.D., Associate Professor of Political 

Science and Dean of Student Affairs. 
Robert Hyman Ayers, A.B., B.D., Assistant Professor of Religion, Acting 

Head of the Department of Religion, and University Chaplain. 
♦♦Wesley Bailey, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Leighton Milton Ballew, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Drama and Head 

of the Department of Speech and Drama. 
James Ammerman Barnes, B.Ed., Ph.M., Assistant Professor of Geography 

and Geology. 
Thomas Albert Barr, Jr., B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
David Francis Barrow, A.B., B.S.C.E., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 
Earl Edward Beach, B.S.M., M.A., Associate Professor of Music. 
Charles Allen Beaumont, A.B., Instructor in English. 
Edwin Gottlieb Beck, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 
♦Theodore Toulon Beck, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of Modern Foreign 

Languages. 
Wightman Samuel Beckwith, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
Elwin Everett Bennington, B.S., Ph.D., Temporary Assistant Professor of 

Biology. 
Charles Benson, B.A., Temporary Instructor in Physics. 
Alvin Blocksom Biscoe, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Dean 

of Faculties. 
Edwin Kingsley Blanchard, B.M., M.M., Assistant Professor of Music. 
Arthur Gibbon Bovee, Ph.B., Certificat de l'Association Phonetique Interna- 
tionale, Professor of the Teaching of French. 

*On leave. 
♦•Died April 14, 1951. 

[105] 



106 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

George Hugh Boyd, A.B., M.S., Sc.D., Professor of Zoology, Head of the De- 
partment of Biology, Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences, 
and Dean of the Graduate School. 

Frances Hoff Brandon, A.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of History. 

♦Erwin Millard Breithaupt, B.F.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Charles Joseph Brockman, B.A., Ch.E., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Robert Preston Brooks, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Econom ics and Emeritus 
Dean of Faculties. 

Calvin Smith Brown, A.B., B.A. (Oxon.), M.A.. Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Sibyl Browne, A.B., B.S., M.A.. Associate Professor of Art. 

James Albert Browning, B.S., Part-time Instructor in Chemistry. 

Anne Wallis Brumby, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of French. 

Charles Merlyn Buess, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

James Whitney Bunting, B.S., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

Walter Clinton Burkhart, B.S., D.V.M., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Elon Eugene Byrd, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Harmon Eldred Calkins, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Bacteriol- 
ogy. 

Iris Callaway, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Paul Alfred Camp, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Drama. 

William Marion Carlton, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Rollin Chambliss, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 

Claude Chance, A.B., M.A., Professor of French. 

Francis Chapin, B.S., Visiting Professor of Art. 

A. Aldo Charles, B.S., LL.B., M.Ed., D.Ed.. Professor of Economics. 

Howard Templeton Coggin, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemis- 
try and Adviser to Pre-Medical Students. 

Alonzo Clifford Cohen, B.S., M.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

Morris William Hollowell Collins. Jr., B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of 
Political Science. 

Charles Dewey Cooper, B.S.. M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ellis Merton Coulter, A.B., A.M., Ph.D.. Litt.D., Regents' Professor of His- 
tory, Head of the Department of History, and Chairman of the Division 
of Social Sciences. 

William Wallace Davidson, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

♦Katherine Imogene Dean, B.S., M.Ed., Instructor in Sociology. 

Vincent Jean Dieball, B.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Ellis Howard Dixon, A.B., M.S., Ph.D.. Professor of Physics and Astronomy 
and Head of the Department of Physics and Astronomy. 

Lamar Dodd, L.H.D., Regents' Professor of Art and Head of the Department 
of Art. 



•On leare. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 107 

♦William Clark Doster, A.B., M.A., Instructor in English. 

John Ayman Downs, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of French. 

Marion Derrelle DuBose, A.B., M.A., Professor Em.eritus of German. 

Marie Frances Dumas, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of English and Co- 
ordinator of Freshman English. 

Nolee May Dunaway, A.B., Instructor in Music. 

Wilbur Howard Duncan, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Patrick DuVal, B.Sc, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Austin Southwick Edwards, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

John Olin Eidson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English, Director of the 
Coordinate Campus, and Editor of "The Georgia Review." 

Edwin Mallard Everett, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English, Head of the 
Department of English, and Chairman of the Division of Language and 
Literature. 

♦Carolyn Vance Foreman, A.B., M.A., Assistaiit Professor of Speech. 

Tomlinson Fort, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Regents' Professor of Mathematics and 
Head of the Department of Mathematics. 

James Edward Gates, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Dean of the 
College of Business Administration. 

Rubin Gotesky, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy. 

E. Louise Grant, B.S., M.A., Nursing Diploma, Professor of Nursing Educa- 
tion and Head of the Department of Nursing Education. 

John Stanley Gray, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Marion Hall, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Modern Foreign Languages. 

Clara Eddy Hamilton, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Robert Ivy Harrison, B.F.A., Juilliard Graduate School, Part-time Associate 
Professor of Music. 

*John Fraser Hart, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography and 
Geology. 

Linville Laurentine Hendren, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of 
Physics and Astronomy and Emeritus Dean of Faculties. 

Robert Gilbert Henry, A.B., M.S., Associate Professor of Physics and As- 
tronomy. 

Pope Russell Hill, B.S.A., M.S., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Hugh Hodgson, B.S., Regents' Professor of Music, Head of the Department 
of Music, and Chairman of the Division of Fine Arts. 

Roberta Hodgson, A.B., M.A., Instructor Emeritus in History and Political 
Science. 

Annie May Holliday, B.S., Associate Professor of Art. 

Gerald Boone Huff, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Lawrence Huff, A.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Melvin Clyde Hughes. A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political 
Science. 



•On leave. 



108 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Henry Grady Hutcherson, B.S.Ed., M.A., Instructor in English. 

George Alexander Hutchinson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of 
Sociology. 

Donald Leroy Jacobs, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany. 

William Thomas James, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

♦Edvard Arthur Johnson, B.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Wilbur Devereux Jones. A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Howard Sheldon Jordan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of French and Head 
of the Department of Modern Foreign Languages. 

Arthur Kaplan, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Classics. 

Despy (Skourlas) Karlas, B.A., Juilliard Graduate School, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Music. 

Arthur Randolph Kelly, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Anthropology and 
Archaeology and Head of the Department of Anthropology and Archaeol- 
ogy. 

Lucile Kimble, A.B., Associate Professor of Music. 

Frederick Edward Kopp, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Music. 

Rudolph Kratina, Part-time Associate Professor of Music. 

James Frederick Lahey, Ph.B., M.A.. Assistant Professor of Geography and 
Geology. 

Robert Jules Levit, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Robert Lorenz, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

Horace Odin Lund, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Entomology and Chairman 
of the Department of Biology. 

Earl Stuart McCutchen, B.F.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

♦Chalmers Alexander McMahan, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Sociology. 

John Hanson Thomas McPherson. A.B., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of His- 
tory and Political Science. 

Ellen Rhodes McWhorter, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

♦Hezzie Boyd McWhorter, B.S., M.A., Instructor in English. 

James Henry Madden, B.F.A., M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Eugene Pennington Mallary. B.L., LL.B., M.A., Associate Professor Emeri- 
tus of Philosophy. 

* James Edwin Martin, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Physics. 

Sidney Walter Martin, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of History and Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Bernard Stephen Martof, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Temporary Assistant Professor 
of Biology. 

Eugene Mather, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geography and 
Geology. 

John Cassius Meadows, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 



•On leave. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 109^ 

James Harris Mitchell. B.A., Associate Professor of Music and Adviser to 
B.F.A. Students. 

Horace Montgomery, A.B.. A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of History and 
Adviser to A.B. Students. 

John Morris, A.B., M.A., B.L., Professor Emeritus of German. 

Theodore Edward Nichols, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

John William Nuttycombe, B.S.Chem., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Eugene Pleasants Odum, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Robert Travis Osborne. A.B., M.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psy- 
chology and Director of the Veterans Guidance Center. 

Anne Olivia Palmour. A.B., M.A.. Instructor in English. 

Eldon Joseph Parizek, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography 
and Geology. 

Edd Winfield Parks, A.B.. A.M., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Joseph John Paul, Ph.B.. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Johnnie Inez Peterson, A.B.. M.A., Instructor in Spanish. 

Paul Eugene Pfuetze, B.S., M.A., B.D., Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and 
Head of the Department of Philosophy. 

George Edwin Philbrook, B.S.. M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

* James Edwin Popovk h. B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Drama. 

Merritt Bloodworth Pound. A.B., A.M., Ph.D.. Professor of Political Science 
and Head of the Department of Political Science. 

Merle Charles Prunty, Jr., B.S., A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Geography 
and Geology and Head of the Department of Geography and Geology. 

Willard Edgar Allen Range. A.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of Political 
Science. 

Wiley Devere Sanderson. Jr.. B.F.A., M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Albert Berry Saye. A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 

Julia Schnebly, B.M., M.M.. Temporary Instructor in Music. 

Henry William Schoenborn. A.B., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Alfred Witherspoon Scott, B.S., Ph.D., Terrell Professor of Chemistry. Head 
of the Department of Chemistry, Chairman of the Division of Physical 
Sciences, and Faculty Chairman of Athletics. 

♦Donald Charles Scott, B.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

William Clifton Sears, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

William Hulse Sears, B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Archaeology. 

Gregor Sebba, Dr. of Pol. Sci., Dr. of Law, Professor of Economics. 

Robert Taylor Segrest. B.S.C., M.S.C., Professor of Economics and Asso- 
ciate Dean of the College of Business Administration. 

Edward Scott Sell, B.S.A.. M.S.A., Professor Emeritus of Geography. 

Ezra Lee Sellers, B.F.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 

Karl Eastman Shedd. A.B.. M.A.. Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 



•On leave. 



110 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

♦Clarence Jay Smith, Jr., A.B., M.A., Instructor in History. 

Howard Ross Smith, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

Jennie Belle Smith, B.M., Associate Professor of Music and Supervisor of 
Music in the Demonstration School. 

Thomas Hudson Smith, B.S., M.Ed., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Charles Raymond Spell, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Hugh Smiley Stanley, A.B., A.M., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Roswell Powell Stephens, A.B., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 
and Dean Emeritus of the Graduate School. 

Davtd Boyd Strother, A.B., M.A., Temporary Assistant Professor of Speech. 

Emeliza Swain, A.B., M.S.Ed., Part-time Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

William Tate, A.B., A.M., Associate Professor of English and Dean of Men. 

Andrew Ezell Terry, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of German. 

Howard Wilbur Thomas, Professor of Art. 

Clara Mildred Thompson, A.B., A.M., LL.D., Ph.D., Professor of History. 

John Laurens Tison, Jr., B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Emil Samuel Troelston, B.S., A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

John Chalmers Vinson, A.B., M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of His- 
tory. 

Laurence Henry Walker, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Part-time Acting Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Economics. 

Lester Carl Walker, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Temporary Assistant Professor 
of Art. 

Roosevelt Pruyn Walker, A.B., M.A., Professor of English. 

Charles Augustus Wall, Jr., Ph.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Frances Louise Wallis, A.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Antonio Johnston Waring, Jr., B.A., M.D., Research Associate in Anthro- 
pology and Archaeology. 

Byron Hilbun Warner, B.S., Associate Professor of Music. 

Harold George Wescott, B.E., M.A., Associate Professor of Art. 

Robert Hunter West, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Jonathan Jackson Westfall, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Botany and 
Head of the Department of Botany. 

*Thomas Hillyer Whitehead, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Cecil Norton Wilder, B.S.A., M.S.A., Associate Professor of Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

Barnett Osborne Williams, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and 
Head of the Department of Sociology. 

John Dowell Williams, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish. 

Charles Christopher Wilson, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bot- 
any. 



'On leave. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 111 

Annie Virgil Womack, B.F.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Modern Foreign 

Languages. 
Floeene Young, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Acting Head 

of the Department of Psychology. 
May Zeigler, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of Psychology. 
Wilbue Zelinsky, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Geography and Geology. 



Omeb Clyde Adeehold, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., President of the University. 
Alvin Blocksom Biscoe, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of Faculties. 



Joseph Thomas Askew, Ph.B., M.A., LL.D., Dean of Student Affairs. 
Walter Newman Daxner, Jr., B.S.A.E., M.S.A., Registrar and Director of Ad- 
missions. 
John Dixon Bolton, C.P.A., Comptroller and Treasurer. 



SPECIAL LECTURERS, DEPARTMENT OF ART* 

Francis Chapin, Artist 

Ralph Fanning, Art Historian 

Sue Fuller, Graphic Artist 

James Johnson Sweeney. Art Critic and Author 



•This is a partial list of visiting artists and lecturers for the 1951-52 academic year. 



112 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ORGANIZATION 

The object of the College of Arts and Sciences is to offer to its students 
a liberal education. It strives to develop in the individual a resourcefulness 
that will enable him to adapt himself to changing conditions and circum- 
stances and to grapple intelligently with the problems the future is certain 
to bring. It also attempts to give the student an opportunity to concentrate 
in certain fields of study that may be helpful in laying a foundation for 
various professional pursuits. 

CURRICULUM 

The curricula of the College of Arts and Sciences for the freshman and 
sophomore years, except for a few elective courses, are fairly uniform and 
required of all students. In the junior and senior years concentration in 
one or more of several fields of study is required. These fields of concen- 
tration are as follows: 

Division of Language and Literature: the departments of Classics, Eng- 
lish, and Modern Foreign Languages. 

Division of Social Sciences: the departments of Anthropology and Archae- 
ology, Economics, Geography, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, 
and Sociology. 

Division of Physical Sciences: the departments of Chemistry, Mathe- 
matics. Geology, and Physics and Astronomy. 

Division of Biological Sciences: the departments of Biology, Botany, and 
Psychology. 

Division of Fine Arts: the departments of Art. Music, and Speech and 
Drama. 

The degrees offered in the College are: 

Bachelor of Arts, for which the major division must be Language and 
Literature, Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, Art, or 
Music. 

Bachelor of Science, for which the major division must be Physical 
Sciences or Biological Sciences. 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, for which the major subject must be 
Chemistry. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts, for which the major division must be Fine Arts. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education. 

ACADEMIC ADVISERS 

When an undergraduate student initially registers in the College of Arts 
and Sciences he is assigned to a faculty member who serves as his academic 
adviser during his first two years. This assignment is made on the basis 
of the expressed academic interests of the student. The academic adviser 
assists the student in registration, and is available during his office hours 
for counseling with the student about his study methods, his progress, his 
plans and purposes, and any other matters pertaining to his academic pro- 
gress. He will hold required conferences with students who demonstrate un- 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES U3 

usual ability or unsatisfactory results. He will advise sophomores on the 
choice of their fields of concentration and refer them to the appropriate 
departmental heads for the preparation of senior college sequences. 

SELECTING MAJOR 

On or before registering for the junior year the student must select the 
degree for which he is a candidate, the division in which he will take his 
major work, and the subject in this division in which he expects to major. 
The professor in charge of the student's major subject is known as the stu- 
dent's major professor and all courses constituting the student's major divi- 
sion program (both required and elective courses) must be approved by this 
adviser. When approved by the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences this 
program becomes a requirement for the degree. All approvals to be official 
must be in writing and filed in the Registrar's records. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

In all degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences all courses in the 
University carrying credit of three or more quarter hours are open as 
electives to the extent allowed by the degree requirements when approved 
by the student's major professor and his dean. Not more than fifteen 
hours credit will be allowed for professional courses in the professional 
schools, except in the A.B. degree with special provision for the professional 
certificate. (See page 119.) 



BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

DEGREES 

The main purpose of the curricula for these degrees is to aid in develop- 
ing an appreciation for cultural pursuits and to prepare the student for ad- 
vanced graduate study in the various liberal arts fields and for matriculation 
in professional schools such as Law, Medicine, Business Administration, and 
Journalism. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students transferring from standard colleges and universities with junior 
classification will not be required to take the survey courses offered in the 
freshman and sophomore years, provided their transcripts show that they 
have completed an equivalent number of hours in the division covered by 
the survey courses. 

Students transferring from any of the junior colleges or other units of 
the University System to the College of Arts and Sciences are given full 
credit for all regular curriculum work completed with satisfactory grades. 
Any uncompleted required courses in the freshman and sophomore years 
must be taken. 



114 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS AND 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 Literature _ 10 

Mathematics 101 x-y 10 (See Item 10 below) 

Political Science 1 5 History 110 x-y 10 

Foreign Language 10 Social Studies „_ 5 

(See Item 11 below) (See Item 8 below) 

Science (See Item 2 below)... ..10 Foreign Language or 10 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 (See Item 11 below) 

Physical Education 1 (for men) Science (See Item 2 below) 10 

or Elective 10 or 

Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

Physical Education 2 (for men).... 

or 
Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 

Total 50 Total 50 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

(95 hours to complete the total requirements listed below) 

TOTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Hours 

1. Mathematics 101 x-y, Algebra and Trigonometry 10 

2. Science 20 

Human Biology 1-2 10 hours 

and 
Physical Science 1 and either Chemistry 21 

or Geology 4 10 hours 

3. Laboratory Science 10 to 20 

a. For Bachelor of Arts students 10 hours 

One double laboratory course from the following: 
Botany 21-22 
Chemistry 21-22-23 
Geology 25-26 
Physics 20, 27, 28, 329 
Zoology 25-26 

b. For Bachelor of Science students 20 hours 

Two double laboratory courses, one from the Biological 
Science Division and one from the Physical Science Di- 
vision, from the following: 

Botany 21-22 

Chemistry 21-22-23 

Geology 25-26 

Physics 20, 27, 28, 329 

Zoology 25-26 

4. Political Science 1 5 

5. History 110 x-y, History of Western Civilization . 10 

6. History 350 x-y, American History 10 

7. Philosophy 399, Philosophy and Society (seniors only) 5 

8. Social Studies 15 

Three courses from the following 

Anthropology 102, Man and His Culture 
Economics 5x, Principles of Economics 
Geography 101, World Human Geography 
Philosophy 104, Introduction to Philosophy 
Psychology 1, Introduction to Psychology 
Sociology 5, Introduction to Sociology 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 115 

9. English 2 x-y, Grammar and American Literature 10 

10. English 22 x-y, Survey of European Literature, or French 201-202, or 
German 201-202, or Spanish 201-202 _ 10 

11. Foreign Language 10, 15, or 20 

Four courses or 20 hours must be taken in one language combined 
in high school and college, of which at least 10 hours must be in col- 
lege. If a student continues in college a language begun in high school, 
each unit of high school credit will be accepted as the equivalent of 
5 hours of college work. However, a student cannot take for college 
credit Language 101 or 102 if he has presented two high school units 
in this language. 

12. Classical Culture 10 

This requirement is for Bachelor of Arts students only and may be 
satisfied by one ten-hour sequence from the following: 

Classical Culture 301x and Classical Culture 301y 

Classical Culture 301x and Classical Culture 358 

Classical Culture 354, 355, 356, or 357 and Classical Culture 301y 

Classical Culture 354, 355, 356, or 357 and Classical Culture 358 

If Latin or Greek is elected to meet the foreign language require- 
ment (see Item 11), the student is exempt from the Classical Culture 
requirement. 

13. Fine Arts 300, Music and the Visual Arts 5 

14. Major _„ .30 

The major consists of at least 30 hours taken in one division, of 
which 20 hours must be in one subject. At least ten hours in courses 
numbered 200 or above must be taken in the major subject.* No course 
can be used to satisfy any part of the minimum of SO hours required in 
a major if it has also been used to satisfy any of the requirements listed 
under Items 1-13 or if it has been taken before a student has been 
admitted to the senior division. 

No course with a grade of D or D-f can be used to satisfy any part 
of the minimum requirement in a student's major. 

For the Bachelor of Arts degree, the major division must be either 
Language-Literature, Social Sciences, Physical Sciences, Biological 
Sciences, Art, or Music. For the Bachelor of Science degree the major 
division must be either Physical Sciences or Biological Sciences. By 
special action of the dean and the major professor a combined divisional 
major may be offered, part from the Biological Science Division and 
part from the Physical Science Division, or one may be authorized, part 
from the Social Science Division and part from the Language-Litera- 
ture Division. 

15. Free Elective Courses 

Bachelor of Arts 15 to 35 

Bachelor of Science 15 to 25 

16. Total Requirements 185 

(Exclusive of Military Science 1-2 or Air Science 5-6 and Physi- 
cal Education 1-2). 



♦Majors in languages see page 159. 



116 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

MAJORS IN FOREIGN AREAS WITHIN THE BACHELOR 
OF ARTS DEGREE 

On the advice of their major professor, students may select majors dealing 
with specific areas outside the continental United States. This option is 
designed to provide (1) both a cultural background and more intensive 
study of foreign areas than is possible within a major taken exclusively in 
a single department, and (2) an undergraduate preparation for advanced 
studies in foreign areas or international relations. 

The student desiring to concentrate in a foreign area should major in one 
of the following departments: Economics, Geography, History, Modern For- 
eign Languages, Political Science. He should consult with the major pro- 
fessor in one of the above departments to select courses from related de- 
partments. A minimum of 20 hours of courses numbered above 200 must be 
taken in the major department; the remainder of the student's time available 
for major and elective courses should be spent in courses in related depart- 
ments. All other requirements for the A.B. degree as outlined on pp. 114-115 
must be met. It is strongly recommended that the student complete 10 hours 
in one modern foreign language in courses numbered above 200 which em- 
phasize speaking and writing. 

CURRICULUM FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
WITH A MAJOR IN ART OR MUSIC 

Hours 
Basic Curriculum: Items 1 through 12, A.B. Degree, pages 114-115—125 to 135 

For Major in Art: 

Freshman and Sophomore Years — Art 20, 30, 40 15 

Junior and Senior Years— Art 281, 282, 283, 121, 231 or 241, 

Art (on advisement), Music 343 or 358 33 to 35 

For Major in Music: 

Freshman Year — Music 10, 11, 12 9 

Sophomore Year— Music 31, 32, 22 15 

Junior and Senior Years— Music 350, 370, 353, 371, 442, 

462, 456 or 457, Art 317 32 

Applied Music— Music 85abc, 86abc, 287abc, 288abc 12 

Electives, when needed, to complete total of 185 quarter hours, exclusive of 
Military Science 1-2 or Air Science 5-6 and Physical Education 1-2. 

CURRICULUM IN ARTS AND LAW 
(An Eighteen-Quarter Combined Curriculum) 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 Literature 10 

Mathematics lOlx 5 (See Item 10, page 115) 

Human Biology 1-2 10 History 110 x-y 10 

Foreign Language 103-104 10 Physical Science 1 5 

(See Item 11, page 115) Chemistry 21 or Geology 4 5 

Political Science 1 5 Laboratory Science 10 

Social Studies 5 (See Item 3, page 114) 

(See Item 8, page 114) Social Studies 5 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 (See Item 8, page 114) 

Physical Education 1 (for men).... Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

or Physical Education 2 (for men).... 

Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 or 

Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 

Total 50 Total 50 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 117 

Junior 

Hours 

Social Studies (See Item 8, page 114) 5 

History 350x-y 10 

Philosophy 358 5 

Classical Culture 301x-y 10 

(See Item 12, page 115) 

Fine Arts 300 , 5 

Elective (Courses numbered 200 or above) 15 

Total 50 

Three quarters of residence work, including 45 hours in courses numbered 
200 or above, devoted exclusively to courses in the College of Arts and Sciences 
will be required after admission to senior division standing. 

If the student does not present two entrance units in a foreign language or 
elects not to continue a language in which he has two units, he will, of neces- 
sity, have to add the additional five or ten quarter hours to his total require- 
ments. 

Senior 

Satisfactory completion of the first year of work in the School of Law and a 
total of 185 academic quarter hours. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

The curriculum for this degree offers training in the field of chemistry 
and its allied sciences for students who desire to enter commercial or gov- 
ernment laboratories, to enter the teaching profession, to become associated 
with chemical industries in a non-technical position, or to pursue graduate 
work in chemistry in order to enter some field of research or college teaching. 

REQUIRED COURSES IN FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2x-y and 22x 15 English 22y 5 

Chemistry 21-22-23 15 Mathematics 354, 355 10 

Mathematics lOlx-y, 110 15 German 101-102-103 15 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 Chemistry 340a-b, 380 15 

Physical Education 1 (for men).... Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

or Physical Education 2 (for men) 

Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 or 

Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 

Total 50 Total 50 

An average of B or better is required, both in chemistry and in all fresh- 
man and sophomore work, in order to continue in the junior year for this 
degree, and an average of B must be maintained in both thereafter. 

No transfer student will be accepted as a candidate for this degree later 
than the beginning of his junior year. A student who wishes to take this 
degree should enter the university no later than the beginning of his sopho- 
more year. 

REQUIREMENTS IN JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

(1) Political Science 1: Five hours. 

(2) French: Through French 103.* 

(3) Physics: Fifteen hours. 

(4) Chemistry: 440; two of 441, 480, or 481; 445h, 490a-b-c, two of 420, 
421, 422; and one other 5-hour course. 

*If two years of French were taken in high school, French 103 should be taken in 
the freshman year. 



118 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



(5) Comprehensive Examination: The passing of a comprehensive exam- 
ination (embracing the principal divisions of chemistry), this exam- 
ination to be taken toward the end of the senior year. 

(6) Electtves: A sufficient number of hours to make a total of not less 
than 185, exclusive of the required courses in Military Science 1-2, 
Air Science 5-6, or Physical Education 1-2. 



CURRICULUM IN SCIENCE AND MEDICINE 

PRE-MEDICAL PROGRAM 



Freshman 

Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 

Mathematics lOlx 5 

French 103 or German 103- 5 

Political Science 1 5 

Chemistry 21-22 „_10 

Human Biology 1-2 10 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 
Physical Education 1 (for men).— 

or 
Physical Educaiton 1 (for women) 5 



Sophomore 

Hours 

Literature 10 

(See Item 10, page 115) 

Mathematics lOly __ 5 

Zoology 25-26 10 

Physics 20 or 27, and 28 ...10 

Chemistry 23 5 

Psychology 1 5 

Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 
Physical Education 2 (for men)— _ 

or 
Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 



Total 



.50 

Junior 



Total 50 

Hours 

Chemistry 340a-b, 380 15 

Physics 329 5 

Economics 5x or Sociology 5 5 

History 110 x-y 10 

Elective (Courses numbered 200 or above) 15 



Total. 



50 



(A student will find it difficult to meet the requirements in one year of 
residence unless he submits two units of French or German from high 
school.)* 

Senior 

The satisfactory completion of the first year's work at the Medical College 
of Georgia at Augusta and a total of 185 academic quarter hours. 

TWO-YEAR PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE PROGRAM 



Freshman 

Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 

Mathematics 101 x-y 10 

Political Science 1 5 

Chemistry 21-22 10 

Botany 21-22 10 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 
Physical Education 1 (for men).... 

or 
Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 



Sophomore 

Hours 

English 6 5 

Dairy 3 3 

Animal Husbandry 1 3 

Poultry Husbandry 60 5 

Zoology 25-26 -.10 

Chemistry 340 a-b —10 

Physics 20 5 

Electives 5 

Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 
Physical Education 2 (for men).— 

or 
Physical Eudcation 2 (for women) 5 



Total.. _ — 50 



Total. 



51 



'See residence rule, page 59. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 119 

CURRICULUM FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE WITH 

PROVISIONS FOR A PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR 

TEACHING IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

The requirements for this degree total 190 hours, with 155 hours to be 
taken in the College of Arts and Sciences and a minimum of 35 hours to be 
taken in the College of Education. The program of the individual student 
will be worked out jointly by the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 
and the dean of the College of Education. Students are advised to plan the 
program as early as possible, not later than during the first part of the 
sophomore year. 

DIVISION OF FINE ARTS 

The Division of Fine Arts is administered by the College of Arts and 
Sciences. It includes art, music, and speech and drama. The function of this 
Division is to give training in appreciation, to help students form standards 
of taste, to promote culture in the entire community, and to train specialized 
performing artists and teachers. To accomplish these objectives this Division 
collaborates with other schools, divisions, and departments, especially those 
of languages, education, and home economics. In the College of Arts and 
Sciences curricula of four years are offered, with a major in art, music, and 
speech and drama. 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS DEGREE 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours 

Hours Literature 10 

English 2x-y 10 (See Item 10, page 115) 

Political Science 1 5 History 110 x-y 10 

Foreign Language (2) 10 Science (1) 10 

Mathematics lOlx 5" Fine Arts (3) 15 to 21 

Fine Arts (3) 15 Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 Physical Education 2 (for men).... 
Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 or 

or Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 
Physical Education 1 (for men)... 

Total 50 Total 50 to 56 

(1) See Item 2, page 114. 

(2) See Item 11, page 115. If the freshman does not present two entrance 
units in language or if he prefers to begin a new language, 20 hours are 
required. 

(3) Major in Art 

Concentration in Art Education 
Freshman — Art 20, 30, 40 
Sophomore — Art 111 

One from Art 100, 121, 160 
Art 208 or 231 
Concentration in Advertising Design & Commercial Art 
Freshman — Art 20, 30, 40 
Sophomore — Art 111, 121, and 208 
Concentration in Crafts 
Freshman— Art 20, 30, 40 
Sophomore — Art 111 

Art 121 or 160 
One from Art 208, 211, 221 
Concentration in Ceramics 
Freshman — Art 20, 30, 40 
Sophomore — Art 111 and 160 
Art 211 or 121 



120 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Concentration in Drawing & Painting 
Freshman— Art 20, 30, 40 
Sophomore — Art 111 and 121 

One from Art 211, 221, 231 
Concentration in Interior Design 
Freshman— Art 20, 30, 40 
Sophomore — Art 111 

Art 121 or 160 
Art 211 or 221 

Major in Drama 

Freshman — Drama 1, 2, 3 

Sophomore — Drama 220, 221, and 5-hour elective 

Major in Music 

Concentration in Applied Music, Music Literature, Theory- 
Composition 

Freshman — Music 10, 11, 12, and 71abc 
Sophomore — Music 34, 35, 36, 22abc, and 72abc 
Concentration in Music Education 

Freshman — Music 10, 11, 12, 85abc, and 87abc 
Sophomore — Music 34, 35, 36, 22abc, 86abc, and 88abc 

Major in Speech 

Freshman — Speech 8 

Science, 10 hours (See Item 2, page 114.) 
Sophomore— Speech 50, 309, and 350 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

The Department of Art occupies the entire east wing of the Fine Arts 
Building. Besides studios and staff offices, it includes a spacious art gallery 
where periodically changing exhibitions are shown. The General Library 
houses the Georgia Museum of Art in which the Eva Underhill Holbrook 
Memorial paintings from the nucleus of a permanent collection. A Fine 
Arts Library functions as a supplement to the University Library and pro- 
vides a convenient reference room for art students. Closing the calendar for 
the season is an annual exhibition of students' art work from which exam- 
ples are selected to be kept in the Department. 

The objective of the Department of Art is to provide training in the funda- 
mental principles of the creative visual arts. Emphasis is given to active 
experience with tools and materials. A well-balanced program with its 
courses in drawing and painting, design, art history, art structure, com- 
mercial art, crafts, ceramics, sculpture, art education, and interior design 
is so integrated that each course functions to advantage in its relations to 
each of the other courses. From this integration the student is enabled to 
derive a knowledge of the basic principles underlying all art, and is thereby 
better equipped to interpret, appreciate, and create works of art. 

In the freshman and sophomore years, 30 hours of art are required in 
addition to the general academic requirements. On entering the junior year, 
the student selects his major field of concentration from the six fields offered: 
Art Education, Advertising Design and Commercial Art, Ceramics, Crafts, 
Interior Design, and Painting and Drawing. Upon completion of this pro- 
gram and fulfillment of all requirements, the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree 
is conferred. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in art is also offered. (See A.B. 
degree.) In the College of Education a Bachelor of Science in Education with 
a major in art is offered. (See College of Education.) 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 121 



TRIPS 
Each year art majors, accompanied by members of the Art Staff, make trips 
to leading museums and exhibitions. Sketching and painting trips are made 
occasionally during the year to localities within driving distance of Athens. 

INTERNSHIPS 
Arrangements have been made with leading commercial establishments in 
the South in order that art majors may serve internships during the summer 
between their junior and senior years. In this manner practical experience 
is related to the college curriculum. 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS— MAJOR IN ARTS 

REQUIRED COURSES IN JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 
Courses to be chosen in consultation with major professor. No student 
majoring in art will receive credit for a required course numbered 200 or 
above with a grade below C. 

1. ART EDUCATION 

Hours 

Science (1) 10 

Art 211, Design 5 

Drawing, Painting and Sculpture 15 

Art History 283, and 281 or 282 10 

Ceramics 5 

Art 4 13, Crafts 5 

Education 303 5 

Education 304, 335.9, 336.9 15 

Education 346.9, 347.9, 348.9 15 

Music (Recommend 358) - 5 

Electives - — 5 

95 
2. ADVERTISING DESIGN AND COMMERCIAL ART 

Hours 

Science (1) 10 

Art 241, Watercolor 5 

Art 231 5 

Art History 15 

Landscape Architecture 55 5 

Art 206, 209, and 210 15 

Art 200, Technical Problems 5 

Journalism (Recommend 457) 5 

Music (Recommend 358) 5 

Electives (Recommend Art 221, 223 and 207; or 

Art 211, 387 and Drama 335) 25 

95 
3. CRAFTS 

Hours 

Science (1) 10 

Art 210, Lettering 5 

Crafts ( Senior Division ) 15 

Art 270, Sculpture 5 

Ceramics or Sculpture 10 

Art History 15 

Landscape Architecture 55 5 

Art 221, Drawing and Composition — 5 

Art 206, Advertising Design I 5 

Art 200, Technical Problems, or 211, Design 5 

Music (Recommend 358) 5 

Electives .„. ....10 

95 



122 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

4. CERAMICS 

Hours 

Science ( 1 ) 10 

Art 270, Sculpture 5 

Art History 15 

Ceramics ( Senior Division ) 30 

Art 221, Drawing and Composition 5 

Painting 5 

Crafts 5 

Electives (Recommend: Interior Design, Anthropology 102 and 302, 

Music 358, Sculpture, Landscape Architecture) 20 

95 
5. DRAWING AND PAINTING 

Hours 

Science (1) _ 10 

Art 222, Drawing and Modeling 5 

Painting and Drawing 25 

Art 270, Sculpture _ 5 

Art History ...15 

Music (Recommend 358) 5 

Electives (Recommend Art 211, Art 207, Art 271, Crafts, Drama 335, 
Landscape Architecture 55, Philosophy 399, Psychology 1, and 
Sociology 5) __„30 

95 
6. INTERIOR DESIGN 

Hours 

Science ( 1 ) - — , 10 

One from Art 211, 241, 221 5 

Art History 281, 282, 283 15 

Landscape Architecture 55, 56 10 

Interior Design 389, 390, 391, 290, 387 25 

Crafts or Ceramics 5 

Electives (To be approved by major professor. Recommend Art 221, 
241, 211; Crafts, Ceramics, Landscape Architecture, Home Eco- 
nomics, Business Administration, Philosophy, Psychology, 
Sociology) 25 

95 
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

A student majoring in music for a B.F.A. degree may concentrate in 

a) Applied Music (requiring a public recital, instrumental or vocal) 

b) Theory-Composition (requiring an original major work publicly per- 
formed) 

c) Music Literature (requiring a comprehensive examination) 

d) Music Education (specializing in instrumental or vocal work) 

The degree of B.S. in Education with a major in music is also offered. 
(See College of Education.) 

Junior division courses for a major in music include the regular aca- 
demic courses in addition to courses in elementary theory and harmony. 
These courses are designed to give the student a practical knowledge of 
the theory of music, ear training, and harmony. The senior division courses 
are designed to give the student a broader and more cultural background in 
music. A limited number of practical courses in music may be taken for 
credit. See explanations at the end of course announcement in Music. 

Much stress is laid on public performance through weekly music apprecia- 
tion programs and student recitals on the campus, and other programs in 
fine arts centers established throughout the state. Two oratorios and one 
operetta are given each year by the students, and an outstanding concert 
series of internationally known artists adds to the cultural atmosphere of 
the campus. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 123 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS— MAJOR IN MUSIC 

REQUIREMENTS IN JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

(1) Major Concentrations: 

(a) Applied Music — public recital (instrumental or vocal). 

Hours 

Music Literature courses 350, 353, 442, 456, 457, 462 22 

Music Theoretical courses 370, 371, 374ab 16 

Conducting 362a 2 

Applied Music 273abc, 274abc 12 

(b) Theory-Composition — large original composition in concert in- 
stead of public recital, Music 475 and 476 required; otherwise 
same as Applied Music. 

(c) Music Literature — comprehensive examination and performance 
before music faculty, addition of 11 hours in Music Literature; 
otherwise same as Applied Music. 

(d) Music Education — a comprehensive examination and perform- 
ance before the music faculty will be required before graduation. 
All students must play in Orchestra and Band or sing in choral 
organizations regularly. 

Theoretical Courses 370, 371, 374ab 16 

Applied Music 287abc, 288abc, 289abc, 290abc. 12 

Music Literature Courses— from 350, 353, 442, 456, 457, 462 12 

Education Courses 312, 313, 314, 315 20 

Methods Courses — choice of: 

a. Instrumental: 251, 252, 253, 263abc, 362abc, 389 17 

b. Vocal: 263abc; 362abc. 365. 389 ..... 16 

(2) Science: 10 hours 

(See Item 2, page 114) 

(3) Art: 5 hours 

(4) English: One approved senior division course, 5 hours 

(5) Electives: A sufficient number of hours to bring the total to 185, ex- 
clusive of the required courses in Military Science 1-2 or Air Science 
5-6 or Physical Education 1-2. Courses in fine arts, English, history, 
and foreign languages are especially recommended. to 20 hours. 

(6) All music majors must be able to read simple hymns or music of simi- 
lar difficulty on the piano. All music majors must participate in en- 
semble groups. 

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH AND DRAMA 

The Department of Speech and Drama provides specialized training in 
speech, drama, and Theatre. However, many of the courses are open to stu- 
dents who do not desire a degree, but who wish to enrich their knowledge 
and heighten their appreciation of speech and the arts of the theatre. The 
purpose of the courses is threefold; (1) to give an opportunity for talented 
students to prepare themselves for professional work in the fields of speech, 
drama and theatre, speech correction, and children's theatre; (2) to train 
leaders for the educational field — teachers, directors, and technicians for 
schools, colleges, and civic theatres; (3) to make available for students in 
the University certain courses which will aid them in developing an intelli- 
gent interest in the fields of speech and drama. 

The University Theatre. In addition to the various courses, a series of 
productions is presented each season by the Univeristy Theatre, an organi- 
zation designed for all students who are interested in any phase of dramatic 



124 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

production. The productions are planned in a way to give students, as 
nearly as possible, the actual experience of producing plays as they are 
produced in the professional theatre. They are cast and rehearsed by staff 
directors and the productions designed and built by students working under 
the supervision of the instructors in the various courses. No additional fee 
is charged for membership in this group. 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS— MAJOR IN DRAMA 

REQUIRED COURSES IN JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

Junior Senior 

Hours Hours 

Science 10 Drama 349 5 

(See Item 2, page 114) Drama 350 5 

Drama 300 5 Drama 360, 361, 362 9 

Drama 334 5 English 440 5 

Drama 335 5 English 441 5 

Drama 336 5 Electives 21 

Electives 15 

Total _ -45 Total 50 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS— MAJOR IN SPEECH 

REQUIRED COURSES IN JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

Junior Senior 

Hours Hours 

Speech 369 5 Speech 310 5 

Speech 386 5 Speech 311 5 

Speech 396 5 Electives 40 

Electives 30 

Total _„45 Total 50 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION 

(The main office of the Department of Nursing Education is located in 
Atlanta. Address communications in care of the Department of Nursing Edu- 
cation, University of Georgia, 24 Ivy Street, S.E., Atlanta, Georgia. An 
office is also maintained on the Athens campus and is located on the second 
floor of the Academic Building; it is open one or two days weekly.) 

The Department of Nursing Education prepares professional nurses for 
service in civilian hospitals and the government nursing services, for rural 
and urban community health programs in both the curative and preventive 
phases and for teaching in schools of nursing. Three programs are offered: 
(1) Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education for high school graduates or 
transfers from colleges; (2) Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education for 
graduate registered nurses; (3) Centralized teaching program in the Atlanta 
Division, University of Georgia. 

PROGRAMS 

I. 

The eightee?i-quarter curriculum for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
Education is designed for selected high school graduates and for those stu- 
dents whose qualifications permit them to transfer from another college 
major to nursing education.* A total of 186 quarter hours, exclusive of Physi- 



! See residence rule, page 59. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



125 



cal Education 1-2, is required. Physical Education is required of all freshmen 
and sophomores, but may be waived for transfer students who have had two 
years of college work and who have junior standing. 

In detail, the work of the eighteen-quarter curriculum for the first six 
quarters is as follows: 



Freshmax 

Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 

Chemistry 21 5 

Mathematics 10 lx 5 

Human Biology 1-2 10 



Psychology 1 

Speech 8 or 50 

Political Science 1 . 
Physical Education 



Sophomore 

Hours 

History 110 x-y 10 

Biology 11-12 6 

Nursing Education 30 1 

Nursing Education 31 4 

(Units 1 through 6) 

Nursing Education 200 or 323 3 

Bacteriology 11 3 

Education 304 5 

Psychology 358 or 423 5 

Sociology 5 5 

Nursing Education or Elective 5 

Physical Education 2 5 



Total- 



s'' 



Total 52 



Nine quarters (29-45 hrs.) of clinical nursing instruction and practice, at 
an approved general hospital, in the following clinical subjects: medical and 
surgical; at special hospitals, psychiatric, orthopedic, and public health nurs- 
ing. Of the last three quarters one will be spent at an approved school of 
nursing and will include Nursing Education 346-347-348, 15 hours; and the 
other two quarters must be spent at the University in Athens or in the At- 
lanta Division. The subjects on the Athens Campus or in the Atlanta Divi- 
sion will include: 

Hours 

Chemistry 346, 451 10 

Psychology 423 or 462 5 

Education 556 or 521 5 

Nursing Education 10 

Special courses 0-16 

(Where clinical experience is evaluated at less than 45 hours, the de- 
ficiency will be covered by specific courses in Nursing Education or allied 
fields.) 

In summary, the 196 hours are distributed as follows: 

(a) First 6 quarters 102 hrs. 

(b) Approved hospitals, 9 quarters 29-45 hrs. 

(c) Last three quarters 45-61 hrs. 

1. Athens or Atlanta Division 30-46 hrs. 

2. Approved School of Nursing 10-15 hrs. 



CLINICAL NURSING INSTRUCTION AND PRACTICE 

The clinical nursing instruction and practice will be taken at an approved 
hospital that meets the requirements of the University. The public health 
nursing experience will be with an agency recommended by the State Divi- 
sion of Public Health Nursing. 

Students in this program enter the hospital and enroll in the School of 
Nursing subjects at the beginning of the sixth quarter. The nine quarters 
thereafter are spent in a hospital which qualifies for all or special clinical 
instruction. 

The State Board Examination in Nursing may be written at the close of 
either the basic program or the entire program (eighteen quarters) for the 
Registered Nurse (R.N.) certificate. 



126 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education will be granted 
upon the completion of one of the following programs in Athens or the At- 
lanta Division. 

1. Instructor of Nursing Arts 

The aim of this program is to prepare nurses who are interested in teach- 
ing the Art of Nursing. It qualifies the nurse to begin as an assistant. 
Students have a distribution in sociology, political science, approximately 
16 hours in Nursing Education, and 25 hours in Education, which includes 
directed teaching experience in Nursing Arts for one full quarter supervised 
by a member of the University nursing faculty in an approved hospital school 
of nursing. 

2. Assistant Clinical Instructor 

This program is designed to prepare nurses interested in the first level 
teaching position, Head Nurse. The content is comparable to that of In- 
structor of Nursing Arts with the directed teaching and head nurse experi- 
ences conducted in the clinical nursing field of the student's choice, that is, 
in the medical, surgical, and psychiatric nursing services. 

II. 

The curriculum for the graduate registered nurse leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education can be completed in approxi- 
mately nine quarters, if the applicant receives the maximum of 45 quarter 
hours credit for her basic school of nursing work. A total of 186 hours credit 
will be required, exclusive of Physical Education.* 

The major programs of study in Nursing Education are: 

1. Instructor of Nursing Arts. 

2. Clinical Instructor and Supervisor of a clinical department in a hos- 
pital, such as medical, surgical, or psychiatric. 

3. Teaching of the Physical and Biological Sciences in schools of nursing. 

4. Teaching of the Social Sciences in schools of nursing. 

Applicants for this curriculum may reduce the length of time of study on 
the campus in various ways: (1) By taking required subjects in English, 
sociology, psychology, and history in a college in the locality of their resi- 
dence or through the University of Georgia Extension Division; or (2) by 
registering for the professional nursing education courses conducted by the 
University of Georgia Extension Division. 

AIMS OF PROGRAM 

1. Described in the 18-quarter program. 

2. Clinical Instructor and Supervisor. 

This program is planned to meet the needs of head nurses interested in 
preparing for the second level teaching position, supervisor. Successful ex- 
perience as a manager of a hospital unit, and the qualities to work with 
student nurses and other personnel are essential to qualify for admission into' 
this program. 

3. Teaching of Physical and Biological Sciences. 

This program is intended for the registered nurse who requests a plan of 
instruction to qualify her to teach the elementary basic sciences in schools of 
nursing. Emphasis will be placed upon the integration of the scientific princi- 
ples with the nursing care of patients and the problems of personal and com- 
munity health. 



: See residence rule, page 59. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 127 

4. Teaching of the Social Sciences. 

This program is intended for the registered nurse who requests a plan of 
instruction to qualify her to teach professional adjustments, history of nurs- 
ing, sociology, social problems in nursing, and psychology in schools of nurs- 
ing. 

Program 4 has been adjusted to meet the request for the graduate registered 
nurse who does not plan to teach. In place of student teaching, electives in 
English, home economics, sociology, psychology, and other approved subjects 
may be carried. 

For those public health nurses who have the approval of the head of the 
Department of Nursing Education and the instructor for the course in public 
health nursing, program 4 may also be changed to permit the substitution of 
10 hours in public health nursing for one 5-hour course in psychology and 
one 5-hour course in sociology. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Program 1 

Hours 

Credit allowed for three-year diploma work 29-45 

English 2 x-y 10 

Speech 8 or 50 5 

Mathematics lOlx or Nursing Education 1 5 

Chemistry 10 

Biological Sciences 15 

Human Biology 1-2 or Human Biology 2 and Zoology 25 10 

Bacteriology 350 5 

Social Sciences 35 

Economics 5x 5 

History HOx-y 10 

Philosophy 399 5 

Political Science 1 5 

Sociology (to include Sociology 315) 10 

Psychology (Psychology 1 and two other 5-hour courses) 15 

Education 10 

Education 304 5 

Education 556 or 520 or Psychology 415 5 

Nursing Education 35-37 

Nursing Education 200, 320, or 323 3 

Nursing Education 321 3 

Nursing Education 324 3 

Nursing Education 325 or 328 3-5 

Nursing Education 326 3 

Nursing Education 327 5 

Nursing Education 346, 347, 348 (in field of major interest) 15 

Special courses 0-16 

(Where clinical experience is evaluated at less than 45 hours, 
the deficiency will be covered by specific courses in Nursing Edu- 
cation or allied fields.) 
Physical Education 1-2 10 



Total 196 

Program 2 

Same as for Program 1 except that the Nursing Education will include the 

following: 

Hours 

Nursing Education 37 

Nursing Education 321 3 

Nursing Education 324 3 

Nursing Education 325 5 



128 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Nursing Education 326 3 

Nursing Education 327 5 

Nursing Education 329 3 

Nursing Education 330 5 

Nursing Education 346, 347 10 

To be eligible for this program the nurse must satisfy the following pre- 
requisite: At least two years of successful experience is required, preferably 
as assistant clinical instructor or head nurse, or teaching experience in the 
nursing arts. 

Program 3 

Hours 

Credit allowed for three-year diploma in nursing 29-33 

English 2x-y 10 

Speech 8 or 50 _ 5 

Mathematics lOlx and Pharmacy 1 10 

Chemistry 35 

Chemistry 21, 22, 23, 340a-b, 380, 451 

Biological Sciences 35 • 

Human Biology 1-2 or Zoology 25-26 10 

Zoology 309, 355, 367 15 

Bacteriology 350, 351 10 

Physics 20 5 

Social Sciences 15 

Philosophy 399 5 

Political Science 1 5 

Sociology 5 

Psychology (Psychology 1 and one other 5-hour course) 10 

Education 10 

Education 304 5 

Education 556 or 520 5 

Nursing Education 19 

Nursing Education 200 or 323 3 

Nursing Education 321 or 326 3 

Nursing Education 324 3 

Nursing Education 327 5 

Nursing Education 346 5 

Special Courses 0-16 

(Where clinical experience is evaluated at less than 45 hours, the 
deficiency will be covered by specific courses in Nursing Educa- 
tion or allied fields.) 
Physical Education 1-2 10 



Total 196 

Program 4 

Hours 

Credit allowed for three-year diploma in nursing 29-45 

English 2x-y 10 

Speech 8 or 50 5 

Biological Sciences 15 

Human Biology 1 and 2 or Human Biology 2 and Zoology 25 10 

Bacteriology 350 5 

Social Sciences 55 

Economics 5x _. 5 

Geography 101 5 

History HOx-y _ 10 

Philosophy 399 5 

Political Science 1 5 

Sociology (to be selected with the counsel of the faculty 

adviser) 25 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 129 

Education 10 

Education 304 5 

Education 556 or 520 5 

Nursing Education 22 

Nursing Education 200, 320, or 323 3 

Nursing Education 321 3 

Nursing Education 324 3 

Nursing Education 326 3 

Nursing Education 327 5 

Nursing Education 346 5 

Special Courses 0-16 

(Where clinical experience is evaluated at less than 45 hours, 
the deficiency will be covered by specific courses in Nursing Edu- 
cation or allied fields.) 
Physical Education 1-2 10 



Total 196 

III. 

Centralized Teaching Program in the Atlanta Division 

Since September 1943 the University has sponsored the instruction of the 
preclinical students for the Crawford W. Long Hospital, the Georgia Baptist 
Hospital, and the Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta. The instruction is centralized 
in the Atlanta Division of the University of Georgia and supervised by the 
Nursing Education staff. 

CENTRALIZED TEACHING PROGRAM 

(3 quarters) 
First Quarter Second Quarter 

Hours Hours 

Biology 10 3 Biology 11 3 

Chemistry la 2% Chemistry lb 2% 

Bacteriology 350a 3 Bacteriology 350b 2 

Psychology 1 5 Sociology 5 5 

13% 12 V 2 

Third Quarter 

Hours 
Biology 12 3 



The student receives 29 quarter hours for the class work satisfactorily 
completed in the three quarters and will receive a total of 28 to 45 hours credit 
for the clinical instruction had in the remainder of the program. This makes 
a total of 57 to 74 hours that the nurse will have to apply toward the degree 
requirements of 196 hours if she continues study at the University. 

EXPENSES 

The expenses for the instruction of the nursing students in the University 
are the same as those of other students, details of which may be found else- 
where in this catalogue. The University of Georgia basic student nurses 
will be charged $10 a quarter while they are having their clinical nursing 
instruction at the hospital. This fee covers registration and supervision by 
the University's Department of Nursing Education. The applicants will also 
be advised by their directors of nursing. 



130 THE UNIVERSIT Y OF GEORGIA 

DEPARTMENTAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The University reserves the right to withdraw any course for which the 
registration is not sufficiently large. Courses not listed may be offered should 
sufficient demand arise and teaching personnel be available. 

Unless otherwise indicated all courses meet five hours a week, and carry 
five hours credit. 

ANTHROPOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

(LeConte Hall, North Campus) 
Head: Kelly. Staff: Sears. Research Associate: Waring. 

102. Man and His Culture. Mr. Kelly. 

An introduction to the study of man as a cultural animal, the development of 
human societies from preliterate beginnings, the rise of complex social organizations 
with an outline study of the major cultures developed by man. 

203. Human Origins. Mr. Kelly. 

A study of the fossil history of mankind — Pleistocene to recent geological periods. 
The student will gain some familiarity with the main eraniometric and anthropometric 
techniques used in racial studies. 

204. The Races of Man. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201. Mr. Kelly. 

A study of the development of modern man into races through the sub-species 
specialization of Homo Sapiens in late Pleistocene and Holocene geological times. 
Human racial hybridism will receive considerable attention in critical world areas 
where new, blended types of man have developed. 

210. Introductory Ethnology. Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or intro- 
ductory course in another social science. Mr. Sears. 

An introduction to the basic principles of ethnology, the historical and analytical 
study of primitive cultures. A number of primitive cultures will be surveyed. These 
will be selected to give the fullest possible coverage in terms of area, race, and culture 
type. 

211. North American Archaeology. Prerequisite: Anthropology 102. Mr. 
Sears. 

An introductory course in the archaeology of North America. Will survey the total 
range of North American prehistory from 10,000 B. C. to the 17th century A. D., trac- 
ing development in each of the major culture areas from the early hunting gathering 
stage to the cultural peaks just before intensive white contact. Special emphasis will 
be placed on the mechanics of cultural change as discernible by the methods of pre- 
history. 

301. Old World Archaeology. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 102. 
Mr. Kelly. 

The development of culture, beginning with the oldest remains of the Stone Age, 
extending through the Stone, Bronze, and Iron Ages. 

302. The American Indian. Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 102. Mr. 
Kelly. 

A survey course on the cultural development of the aboriginal population of the 
New World. 

401. Archaeology of the Eastern United States. Prerequisites: Anthro- 
pology 301 and 302. Mr. Kelly. 

A detailed study of the literature dealing with the archaeology of the Mississippi 
River basin and contiguous areas in the central United States, the Northeastern and 
Southeastern woodlands, with particular reference to the description of archaeological 
remains in the American Southeast and the Caribbean region. 

420. Field and Laboratory Methods in Archaeology. Prerequisite: An- 
thropology 401. Mr. Kelly. 

Methods of archaeological reconnaisance, survey excavation, laboratory preparation 
and analysis of collected materials, study to be pursued in scheduled field expeditions 
to assigned archaeological sites in Georgia. 

801, 802. Research in Southeastern Archaeology. 5 hours each. Pre- 
requisites: 20 hours of anthropology with a 400-course in American ethnology 
or archaeology. Mr. Kelly. 

The student will pursue graduate research on assigned materials of original archae- 
ological context in the existing collections of the University, or will carry out field 
excavations on an archaeological site, or unit of exploration or survey, preparing all 
field recordation and a completed report on the work. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 131 

ART 

(Fine Arts Building, North Campus, unless otherwise specified.) 

Head: Dodd. Staff: Amos, Breithaupt, Browne, Chapin, Dieball, Fanning, 
Holliday, Johnson, Madden, McCutchen, Sanderson, Sellers, Sweeney, Thomas, 

Walker, Wescott. 

ART STRUCTURE 

20. Art Structure. (Drawing). Four laboratory periods and one lecture. 
Mr. Thomas and the Staff. 

An introductory drawing course; landscape, figure, still life. Experience in several 
mediums. Study of the masters. 

30. Art Structure (Design). Four laboratory periods and one lecture. 
Miss Amos and the Staff. 

Organization of the visual elements; line, color, texture, volume and space. (Not 
open to those credited with Art 1 and 2.) 

40. Art Structure (Nature of Materials). Four laboratory periods and 
one lecture. Prerequisite: Art 30. Miss Amos and Mr. Sanderson. 

Experience in the manipulation of various three-dimensional materials, wood, 
clay, metal and synthetics. A study of the organic quality of materials and the 
logical treatment and combination of the separate elements to make a new form. 

DESIGN 

111. Design. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 30. Miss Amos 
and Miss Holliday. 

A study of line, value, shape, color and texture in the creation of two-dimensional 
design. 

211. Design. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 111. Miss Amos 
and Mr. Wescott. 
Advanced problems in two-dimensional design. Organization of volumes in space. 

DRAWING, PAINTING, AND COMPOSITION 

121. Drawing and Composition. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. 
Prerequisite: Art 20. Mr. Thomas and the Staff. 

Analyses of the drawings of the great masters. Figure drawing. Composition 
from nature and perspective concepts. 

221. Drawing and Composition. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. 
Prerequisites: Art 20 and 21. Mr. Dodd and Mr. Madden. 

Picture construction through design and composition. 

222. Drawing and Modeling. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. 
Prerequisite: Art 221. Mr. Madden. 

Two and three-dimensional research in the anatomical construction of the human 
figure. 

223. Drawing and Painting. Four laboratories and one lecture. Prere- 
quisite: Art 221. Mr. Dodd. 

Advanced drawing and painting for Drawing and Painting majors. Open as an 
elective by permission of the instructor. 

231. Painting. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. Prerequisites: 
Two drawing courses. Mr. Madden and Mr. Thomas. 

Introductory painting. Aesthetic considerations of picture structure. 

232. Painting. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. Prerequisite: 
Art 231. Mr. Madden and Mr. Thomas. 

Technical consideration of the preparation of grounds, mediums, and pigments. 
Analyses of the techniques of the masters. Oil, tempera, and mixed techniques. 

233-234. Painting. Four laboratory periods and one lecture each. Prere- 
quisite: Art 232. Mr. Thomas. 
Advanced painting. 

241. Watercolor. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisites: one design and 
one drawing course. Miss Holliday and the Staff. 
Study of the transparent watercolor. 



132 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



242. Watercolor. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 241. The 
Staff. 
Continuation of 241 with emphasis upon opaque watercolor (Gouache). 

800-801. General Art. Five laboratory periods. Mr. Dodd. 

802. Drawing and Composition. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisites: 
Art 222 and 234. Mr. Dodd. 

803. Drawing and Composition. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Art 802. Mr. Dodd. 

804. Drawing and Composition. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Art 803. Mr. Dodd. 

831. Painting. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Art 222 and 234. 
Mr. Dodd and Mr. Thomas. 

832. Painting. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 831. Mr. Dodd 
and Mr. Thomas. 



833. Painting. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 832. 
and Mr. Thomas. 

ART HISTORY 



Mr. Dodd 



In the art history courses the student is given an opportunity to become 
acquainted with the great art of the past as well as that of the present day. 
Through this study of the historical, social, and economic conditions of the 
periods producing art, and through analysis, criticism, and interpretation 
of the masterpieces, the student acquires knowledge of the fundamental 
motives and structural principles, and also develops a sensitivity to the 
inherent qualities that make a work of art timeless. The work in art his- 
tory is closely integrated with the studio work. 

281. Ancient and Medieval Art. Mr. Breithaupt. 

A survey of sculpture, architecture, painting, and other arts from prehistoric 
times to the Italian Renaissance. 

282. Renaissance Art. Miss Holliday. 

A study of art from the Italian Renaissance to the early part of the nineteenth 
century. 

283. Modern Art. Mr. Breithaupt. 

A study of art since the middle of the nineteenth century, a survey of contemporary 
art. 

476. History of Hellenic Art. Prerequisites: Art 281, 282, 283, and 
approval of Head of Art Department. Mr. Fanning. 

A specialized study of Hellenic architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts 
of the Archaic, Transitional. Fifth Century, Fourth Century, Alexandrian, and 
Graeco-Roman periods as well as the important periods of Classical Revival in 
Europe and America. Both literary and Archaeological sources will be used. 

480. Art of the Italian Renaissance. Mr. Breithaupt. 

A study of architecture, sculpture, and painting of the fourteenth, fifteenth, and 
sixteenth centuries in Italy. 

481. History of Northern Renaissance Art. Prerequisites: Art 281, 282, 
283. or permission of adviser. Mr. Fanning. 

Historical study of the architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts north of 
the Alps from the waning of the Medieval period to around the beginning of the 
seventeenth century. The artistic achievements in France, Germany, England, and 
the Low Countries will be presented against the background of their political, social, 
and literary accomplishments. 

483. Painting of the 19th and 20th Centuries. Mr. Breithaupt. 

A study of painting from Cezanne to present day artists in the Western "World. 

484. Baroque Art. Mr. Fanning. 

A study of art from the end of the Renaissance to the Industrial Revolution. Em- 
phasis on the history of painting and its relationship to architecture, sculpture, and 
literature of the period. 

490. Objectives of 20th Century Art. Mr. Sweeney. 

A consideration of painting and sculpture today against its historical background. 
A reading seminar related to a course of public lectures. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 133 

880. Special Problems in History of Art. Seminar. Prerequisites: Grad- 
uate standing and permission of faculty. Mr. Fanning. 

A seminar taking in successive years the creative achievements of a given culture 
such as the Italian Renaissance, the Middle Ages, the Industrial Revolution, etc. 
Problems of cultural influence on art, of stylistic analysis, or the connoisseurship 
will be selected for individual research and group presentation and discussion. 

ADVERTISING DESIGN AND COMMERCIAL ART 

206. Advertising Design I. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. Pre- 
requisites: Art 111, 121, and 210. Mr. Johnson. 

Visual communication and graphic techniques. 

207. Illustration. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. Prerequi- 
sites: Art 206, 221, and 231 or 241. Mr. Dieball. 

Application of drawing, painting, and design experiences to the field of illu- 
stration. Experimentation with various mediums and techniques. Study of reproduc- 
tion methods. 

208. Advertising Layout. Three laboratory periods and two lectures. Mr. 
Dieball and Mr. Johnson. 

Fundamentals of color, design, typography, and reproduction related to modern 
advertising problems. Layout of newspaper, magazine, and direct-mail advertising. 

209. Advertising Design II. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. 
Prerequisites: Art 206, 210, and 231 or 241. Mr. Johnson. 

Continuation of Art 206. Advanced problems in advertising design including prepara- 
tion of layouts, comprehensive and finished art, study of production problems. 

210. Lettering. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. Prerequisite: 
Art 30. Mr. Dieball and Mr. Johnson. 

Principles of lettering and letter construction with experience in lettering as used 
and reproduced today. Study of typography in relation to lettering and adver- 
tising design. 

CRAFTS 

151. Crafts. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 30 or 111. Mr. 
Sanderson. (Not offered in 1952-53.) 

Metal work, jewelry, weaving, textile printing, and wood work. An elective for 
students in other departments. 

250. Weaving. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 30 or 255. Mr. 
Sanderson. 

Hand-weaving designed for contemporary living. Experience in drapery, upholstery, 
and suiting with emphasis on color, texture, and pattern. 

2.51. Textile Design and Printing. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisites: 
Art 30 and 111. Mr. Sanderson. 
A course in designing and producing fabrics by stencil and silk screen. 

252. Jewelry and Metal Work. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisites: 
Art 30, 40, and 111. Mr. Sanderson. 

A thorough grounding in the techniques necessary to execute well-designed objects 
in metal; including forming, chain-making, chasing, repousse, stone setting, tool 
making, metal finishing, enameling, and centrifugal casting. 

255. Crafts. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 30. 
Mr. Sanderson. 

Introductory course in weaving, tie and dye. and batik. 

CERAMICS 

160. Pottery. Five laboratory periods. Miss Amos and Mr. McCutchen. 

Form, proportion, and simple ornament as related to pottery shapes. Laboratory 
exercises and related lectures in handbuilding pottery. No previous art experience 
is required. 

261. Pottery. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. Prerequisite: 
Art 160, 161 or 265. Miss Amos and Mr. McCutchen. 

Laboratory exercises and related lectures in the use of the potter's wheel. Exami- 
nation of pottery in relation to other art processes. 



134 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

262. Ceramic Decorative Processes. Four laboratory periods and one 
lecture. Prerequisite: Art 261. Mr. McCutchen. 

The ceramic of past civilizations is examined to understand better the forming 
processes, decorative techniques, and artistic standards in pottery making. The 
adaptation of these techniques applied to the laboratory as a basis for individual 
experimentation by the student. 

263. Ceramic Calculations. Two laboratory periods and three lectures. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 21-22 and Art 261. Mr. McCutchen. 

The chemistry and arithmetic of glazed formulas, compositions, and computations 
studied from the standpoint of technical and artistic points of view. 

265. Pottery. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods. Miss Amos and Mr. 
McCutchen. 

An elementary course in pottery. Laboratory experiences in forming, firing, and 
glazing ceramic wares. 

266. Ceramic Glazes. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. Prere- 
quisite: Art 263. Mr. McCutchen. 

Continuation of Art 263. Emphasis on the adaptation of the fundamentals of glaze 
behavior to decorative and forming processes. 

267. Ceramic Problems. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 266. 
Mr. McCutchen. 

Course for advanced students in ceramics who have sufficient background and 
technical knowledge to carry on independent projects. Problems combining research 
in design and ceramic technology are selected in consultation with the instructor. 

268. Ceramic Problems. Five laboratory periods. Mr. McCutchen. 
Continuation of Art 267. 

460. Advanced Ceramic Design. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisites: 
Art 267 and 268. Miss Amos and Mr. McCutchen. 

Individual development in the use of the materials and processes of the ceramic 
designer. Emphasis on the functional and aesthetic requirements of form and ornament 
in contemporary ceramics. 

461. Historical Processes in Ceramics. Five laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Art 267 and 268. Miss Amos and Mr. McCutchen. 

Individual research into ceramics of the past and adaptation of knowledge to tech- 
nical and aesthetic solutions of contemporary problems. 

SCULPTURE 

270. Sculpture. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Art 20 and 121. 
Mr. Madden. 

Fundamentals of three-dimensional design. Figure, animal, and abstract model- 
ing. Analyses of great sculpture. Casting and patinas. 

271. Sculpture. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 270. Mr. 
Madden. 

Individual problems for advanced students. Stone, wood, and clay. 

ART EDUCATION 

100. Art Principles. Five laboratory periods. Miss Browne. 

The course builds an understanding of the fundamentals of design and composition. 
Students learn to use creatively the basic art materials appropriate for public schools. 
Awareness of art quality is also fostered by gallery visits and lectures illustrated by 
work of artists and children. Readings and discussions encourage a sound attitude 
toward art and art education. 

413. Crafts. Five laboratory periods. Miss Broun e. 

The course develops ability to design three-dimensionally in terms of material, pro- 
cess, and use. According to the needs of individual students, work is done in clay 
modeling, puppetry, papier mache. textile printing, simple weaving, and loom con- 
struction. Use of native materials is stressed. Students have contact with craft pro- 
grams for children. The course is planned to meet the needs of teachers. 

414. Drawing and Painting. Five laboratory periods. Miss Browne. 
Students in this course relate their own work in drawing, pictorial composition, 

color, and technique to the problems of teaching painting. Through readings, dis- 
cussions and visits, students study the role of art experience as a means of personal 
development. Emphasis is placed 'upon the relationship of art to curricular patterns 
of the public school. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 135 

415. Design. Five laboratory periods. Miss Browne. 

The purpose of the course is two-fold: (1) to deepen and broaden the design sense 
of students ; (2) to help them develop means of teaching design as fundamental to 
every art activity. In accordance with the needs of students in the class, the course 
deals with problems of teaching at various age levels. 

416. Modeling and Carving. Five laboratory periods. Mr. Madden. 

The course offers experience in three-dimensional design with materials readily 
available to teachers. 

423. Materials and Design. Five laboratory periods. The Staff. (Sched- 
uled only with consent of adviser.) 

An advanced course offering opportunity to work in one or more of the following 
fields : pottery, weaving, silk-screen printing, metal working. 

536. Teaching of Art in the Secondary School. Prerequisites: Four 
courses in Education. Miss Browne. 

A course for graduate students in Art Education, supervisors, and administrators. 
Problems brought by students in the group will be the basis of the course. Will 
deal with the role of art in core and experience curricula as well as the subject 
matter curriculum. A study will be made of profitable guidance and evaluation of 
art experience that stems from objectives set up in terms of (a) group and adolescence 
needs and (b) the society. 

INTERIOR DESIGN 

290. Interior Design. Mr. Wescott. 

A study of architecture, concepts of interior space, the great periods of furniture 
design and allied crafts, as a background for comparison with contemporary archi- 
tecture, furniture, new materials, methods of manufacture, and present day needs. 

387. Interior Design. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Art 111. 
Mr. Wescott. 

Shop practice in the problems of interior design. A practical application of the 
theories of color and light as they relate to interiors and furnishings. Practical 
work in preparing paints and colors for walls, wood finishing, drapery construction. 
Use of new materials in accessories. 

389. Interior Design. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. Prere- 
quisites: Landscape Architecture 55 and 56. Mr. Wescott. 

Drawing and rendering of plans and elevations; measuring and scaling of interiors 
and furnishings ; creative problems in the treatment of interior space, arrange- 
ment of furnishings on a basis of design and function. 

390. Interior Design. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. Prere- 
quisites: Landscape Architecture 55 and 56 and Art 389. Mr. Wescott. 

Creative problems in the designing of chairs, tables, case goods, and accessories. 
Lectures on design, contemporary materials, and methods of construction. 

391. Interior Design. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. Prere- 
quisites: Landscape Architecture 55 and 56 and Art 390. Mr. Wescott. 

Individual and group projects in planning or remodeling and furnishing of domestic 
interiors, or commercial interiors. Emphasis on the creative approach and con- 
ception of the problem as a whole. Each problem carried through with complete 
plans, elevations, specifications, and perspective renderings. 

TECHNICAL PROBLEMS 

200. Technical Problems. Five laboratory periods. The Staff. 

A special course for students qualified to carry out individual projects in design, 
crafts, drawing, painting, sculpture, or ceramics. Work is done independently of the 
regularly scheduled classes. Scheduling of this course must be approved by the Head 
of the Department of Art. 

ASTRONOMY 

(See Physics and Astronomy) 

BACTERIOLOGY 

(See Biology) 



136 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

BIOLOGY 

(Baldwin Hall, North Campus) 

Head: Boyd. Chairman: Lund. Staff: Bennington, Burkhart, Byrd, Calkins, 
Hamilton, Martof. Nuttycombe, Odum, Paul, Schoenborn, Scott. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

350. Introductory Bacteriology. Two lectures or recitations and three 
double laboratory periods. Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisites: Chemis- 
try 21-22 and two courses in biological science. Mr. Burkhart and Mr. Cal- 
kins. 

Offered for students in agriculture, home economics, pharmacy, nursing education, 
and B.S. in Chemistry. Consists of the fundamental principles of bacteriology. 

351. Bacteriology. Two recitations or lectures and three double laboratory 
periods. Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 350. Mr. Burk- 
hart and Mr. Calkins. 

Includes physiology and classification of bacteria (continued from course 350) 
and an introduction to sanitary bacteriology and serology. 

352. Infectious Diseases of Man. 3 hours. Three lecture or demonstra- 
tion periods. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 350. Mr. Calkins. 

Offered for students in the School of Pharmacy only. Infectious diseases as re- 
lated to public health, and pharmaceutical products for prophylaxis, diagnosis, and 
therapy. 

Admission to the following courses is limited by the availability of space 
and materials. 

400. General Bacteriology. Five double periods of laboratory, lecture 
and recitation. Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisites: Chemistry 340a and 
Botany 21-22 or Zoology 25-26 and two acceptable advanced courses in these 
fields. Mr. Calkins. 

Deals with the biology of the bacteria and the techniques employed in the study 
of them. Offered for B.S. students who have a satisfactory background in the 
biological sciences. 

401. Bacterial Infection. Five double periods of laboratory- lecture, and 
recitation. Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 406. Mr. Cal- 
kins. 

A study of several typical infections produced by bacteria, viruses and rickettsiae, 
emphasizing characteristics of the causative agents, mechanisms of infection, pre- 
vention and control. 

402. Dairy Bacteriology. Two recitations or lectures and three double 
laboratory periods. Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisites: Bacteriology 350 
and 351. Mr. Burkhart. 

A study of the bacteria found in milk and dairy products with special emphasis 
upon their importance to the industry and their relation to the health of the public. 

403. Soil Bacteriology. Two recitations or lectures and three double lab- 
oratory periods. Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisites: Bacteriology 350 
and 351. Mr. Burkhart. 

Special emphasis is placed upon the study of soil bacteria of economic significance. 

405. Food Bacteriology. Two recitations or lectures and three double lab- 
oratory periods. Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisites: Bacteriology 350 
and 351. Mr. Burkhart. 

Deals with the bacteria of foods from the standpoint of their economic significance 
and their relation to the spread of disease. 

406. Immunology. Five double periods of laboratory, lecture and recita- 
tion. Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 400. Mr. Calkins. 

An introduction to the principles of serology, hypersensitivity, and resistance to 
infection. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 137 

BIOLOGY 

1-2. Human Biology. Double course. 10 hours (5 hours a quarter). Four 
lectures and one demonstration period. The Staff. 

The aim of this course is to give the student some acquaintance with vital phe- 
nomena in general and their application to the human organism. The first hali of 
the course will deal particularly with the problems of the individual. Its subject 
matter will include an introduction to the fundamental facts of biology, human 
anatomy, and physiology and the maintenance of health in the individual. The second 
half will deal with the problems of the racial life of man. In this phase of the 
course will be included studies of public health problems, reproduction, genetics 
and eugenics, and development of the race. 

10-11-12. Biology for Nurses. 9 hours. Six lectures or recitations and 
three three-hour laboratory periods. The Staff. 

An introductory study of human anatomy and physiology. Given for students in 
Nursing Education. (Offered in three quarters in the Atlanta Division.) 

370. Genetics. Two lecture and three double laboratory periods. Break- 
age deposit, $2.50. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22 or Zoology 25-26. Mr. Ben- 
nington. 

The study of the laws of biological inheritance and the principles and theories 
associated with them. 

440. Cytology. Two lecture and three double laboratory periods. Prere- 
quisites: Biology 370, or equivalent, and one other approved senior division 
course. Credited toward a major in botany or zoology. Mr. Westfall. 

The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, metabolism, growth, differentiation, 
and reproduction. 

442. Cytogenetics. Two lecture and three double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Biology 370, or equivalent, and Biology 440. Credited toward a 
major in botany or zoology. Mr. Westfall. 

A course dealing with the correlation of genetic data and cytological structures 
and processes, emphasizing the mechanisms of normal chromosome distribution, 
chromosomal aberrations, and their relationship to the development of species. 

ZOOLOGY 

No student will be allowed to take as an elective a course numbered 300- 
399 in zoology unless he has an average of C or above in ail prerequisite 
courses. 

25. General Zoology. Two lectures and three double laboratory periods. 
Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisites: Human Biology 1-2 or Botany 21-22. 
Mr. Nuttycombe. 

A survey of the invertebrate animals, their biology, structure, and relation to other 
animals. 

26. General Zoology. Two lectures and three double laboratory periods. 
Prerequisite: Zoology 25. Mr. Odum. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and natural history of the 
vertebrate animals. 

312 a-b. Human Anatomy and Physiology. 10 hours. Three lectures and 
two double laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Human Biology 1-2 and Chem- 
istry 21-22. Mr. Martof or Mr. Scott. 

Systematic study of the anatomy of the human body and the energy relation- 
ships of human physiology. For physical education and pharmacy majors only. 

353. Animal Ecology. Two lectures and three double laboratory periods. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 25 and 26. Mr. Odum. 

Deals with methods of study and identification of animals in the field, biotic 
and physical factors of the environment, animal communities, and the application 
of ecological principles to wildlife conservation and management. Biology of ter- 
restrial animals will be emphasized. 

355. Embryology. Two lectures and three double laboratory periods. 
Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisites: Zoology 25 and 26. Mr. Nuttycombe. 

An elementary course in embryology in which the chick is used to illustrate the 
basic principles of developmental anatomy. 



138 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

356. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. Two lectures and three 
double laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Zoology 25 and 26. Mr. Martof 
or Mr. Scott. 

A comparison of the structure aud development of organ systems in the different 
vertebrate groups. 

357. Animal Histology. Two lectures and three double laboratory periods. 
Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisites: Zoology 25 and 26. Miss Hamilton. 

A comparative study of the microscopic anatomy of organ systems in representative 
types of animals. 

361. Histological Technique. Five double laboratory periods. Breakage 
deposit, $2.50. Open to majors in zoology only. Miss Hamilton. 

A course offering training in the preparation of histological material, including 
practice in fixing, sectioning, staining, and mounting. 

372. Parasitology. Three lectures and two double laboratory periods. 
Breakage deposit, $2.50. Prerequisites: Zoology 25 and 26. Mr. Byrd. 

A general study of the protozoa and worms parasitic in man and the lower animals. 

373. General Entomology. Three lectures and two double laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Zoology 25 and 26. Mr. Paul. 

A field and laboratory study of the structure, biology, and classification of insects 
and of their general importance and significance to man. 

374. Economic Entomology. Three lectures and two double laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Two courses in Human Biology, botany, or equiva- 
lent. Mr. Paul. 

A course designed to provide the practical information essential for the recognition 
and control of the insect pests most commonly encountered in the field, orchard, 
garden, woodlot, and home. 

375. Forest Entomology. Three lectures and two double laboratory periods. 
Mr. Lund. 

A study of the biology, identification, and control of the species of insects de- 
structive to American forests. 

376. Medical Entomology. Three lectures and two double laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Zoology 25 and 26. Mr. Lund. 

A study of the biology, identification, and control of the species of insects and 
related arthropods of particular importance in the cause or transmission of diseases 
of man and the lower animals. 

381. Ornithology. Two lectures and three double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Zoology 25 and 26. Mr. Oduni. 

An introduction to the study of birds, emphasizing the identification, classification, 
life histories, and economic importance of Georgia species. 

390. Animal Physiology. Three lectures and two double laboratory peri- 
ods. Breakage deposit, $5.00. Prerequisites: Zoology 26 and Chemistry 346 
(or equivalent). Miss Hamilton and Mr. Shoenborn. 

An introduction to general physiological processes with major emphasis on the 
physiology of vertebrates. 

403. Mammalogy. Three lectures and two double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Zoology 25 and 26, and two courses in zoology numbered above 
300. Mr. Odum. 

A study of the taxonomy, distribution, ecology, and evolution of mammals with 
special emphasis on land mammals of the Southeast. 

405. Ichthyology. Three lectures and two double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Zoology 25 and 26. and any two courses in zoology numbered above 
300. Mr. Scott. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1952-53.) 

A study of the taxonomy, distribution, ecology, and evolution of fishes with special 
reference to the marine and freshwater fishes of eastern North America. 

454. Aquatic Biology. Two lectures and three double laboratory periods. 
Prerequisites: Zoology 25, 26, and two zoology courses numbered above 300. 
Mr. Scott. 

A study of fresh-water habitats, dealing primarily with the principles of limnology, 
factors influencing the distribution and production of aquatic organisms, and the 
application of these to fisheries and allied problems. Laboratory is devoted to the 
study of the various types of aquatic habitats in the field. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 139 

473. Advanced General Entomology. Three lectures and two double lab- 
oratory periods. Prerequisite: Zoology 373. For graduate credit, one addi- 
tional senior division course is required. Mr. Lund. 

An advanced treatment of general entomology including biological nomenclature, 
insect evolution and classification, sensory physiology, and other special topics. 

474. Advanced Economic Entomology. Three lectures and two double lab- 
oratory periods. Prerequisite: one of the following zoology courses: 373, 
374, 375, or 376. For graduate credit, one additional senior division course 
is required. 

An advanced treatment of economic entomology including actual field work in 
experimental methods, biological control, and the insect transmission of plant 
diseases. 

477. Chemistry and Toxicology of Insecticides and Fungicides. Three 
lectures and two double laboratory periods. Prerequisites: one course in or- 
ganic chemistry and one of the following zoology courses: 373, 374, 375, or 
376. For graduate credit, one additional senior division course is required. 
Mr. Paul. 

A study of the physical and chemical behavior of insecticides, and accessory ma- 
terials and of their toxicological effects upon plants and animals. 

800. Zoology Seminar. 1 hour. Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in 
zoology. The Staff. 

Weekly meetings for full year devoted to discussions of current literature dealing 
with research in zoology. 

801. Parasitic Protozoa. Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in zoology. 
Mr. Boyd or Mr. Byrd. 

A study of morphology, life histories, classification, and parasitic relationships of 
protozoan parasites of man and the lower animals. 

803. Helminthology. Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in zoology. 
Mr. Byrd. 

A study of the morphology, life histories, classification, and parasitic relationships 
of the flatworms and roundworms. 

805. Insect Parasites. Prerequisites: Zoology 376 and one additional 
senior division course in zoology. Mr. Lund. 

An advanced study of the structure, life-histories, and identification of those insects 
and related arthropods which cause or transmit disease in man or lower animals. 

807. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. Five double periods. Prerequisite: 
Undergraduate major in zoology. Mr. Byrd, Mr. Nuttycombe, Mr. Odum, 
Mr. Schoenbom, and Mr. Scott. 

Deals with the morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny and general biology of the 
following phyla: Protozoa, Porifera, Coelenterata, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, 
Nemathelminthes, Minor Acoelomate Phyla. 

808. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. Five double periods. Prerequisite: 
Zoology 807. Mr. Byrd, Mr. Nuttycombe, Mr. Odum, and Mr. Scott. 

Deals with the morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny and general biology of the follow- 
ing phyla: Annelida, Mollusca, Echinodermata, Arthropoda, Minor Coelomate Phyla. 

820. Cellular Physiology. Three lectures and two double laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Zoology 390 (or equivalent) and Chemistry 340b 
(or equivalent). Mr. Schoenbom. (Offered alternate years.) 

The cell will be used as a unit to study the nature and mechanism of physiological 
processes. 

822. Invertebrate Physiology (Protozoa). Three lectures and two double 
laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Zoology 390 (or equivalent) and Chemis- 
try 340b (or equivalent). Mr. Schoenbom. (Offered alternate years.) 

A study of the physiological processes of the phylum Protozoa. 

823. Invertebrate Physiology (Metazoa). Three lectures and two double 
laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Zoology 390 (or equivalent) and Chemis- 
try 340b (or equivalent). Mr. Schoenbom. (Offered alternate years.) 

A study of the physiological processes of the metazoan invertebrates. 

826. Vertebrate Physiology (Behavioral Systems). Three lectures and 
two double laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Zoology 390 (or equivalent) 
and Chemistry 340b (or equivalent). Miss Hamilton. (Offered alternate 
years. Not offered in 1952-53.) 

Physiology of the nervous system, receptors, and muscles of vertebrates. 



140 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

827. Vertebrate Physiology (Metabolic Systems). Three lectures and 
two double laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Zoology 390 (or equivalent) 
and Chemistry 340b (or equivalent). Miss Hamilton. (Offered alternate 
years. Not offered in 1952-53.) 

Physiology of respiration, circulation, digestion, nutrition, and excretion of verte- 
brates. 

829. Endocrine Physiology. Three lectures and two double laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Zoology 390 (or equivalent) and Chemistry 340b (or 
equivalent). Miss Hamilton. (Offered alternate years. Not offered in 
1952-53.) 

Physiology of the endocrine organs and of reproduction of vertebrates. 

830. Seminar in Parasitology. Credit 1 hour per quarter. Maximum 
credit allowable, 6 hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in zoology or 
consent of instructor. Mr. Byrd. 

Weekly meetings for full year devoted to discussions of parasitological subjects. 

854. Physiological Ecology. Prerequisite: Undergraduate major in 
zoology. Mr. Odum. 

This course will emphasize the use of analytical and experimental methods in the 
study of the relation of environmental factors to behavior and distribution of ani- 
mals in nature. 

900. Problems in Zoology. The Staff. 

This course allows students to work intensively on problems in an approved field 
of zoology. 

BOTANY 

(Baldwin Hall, North Campus) 

Head: Westfall; Staff: Beck, Carlton, Duncan, Jacobs, Wilson. 

21. Elementary Botany. Three one-hour lecture periods and two two- 
hour laboratory periods. Mr. Carlton and the Staff. 

A study of (a) the structure of leaves, stems, and roots ; (b) growth and nutritive 
processes of plants; and (c) the relations of plants to their environment. 

22. Elementary Botany (continued). Three one-hour lecture periods and 
two two-hour laboratory periods. Mr. Carlton and the Staff. 

A study of reproduction, variation, heredity, and evolution of seed plants, with 
studies of representatives of the other major plant groups and their importance. 

305. Identification of Flowering Plants. Five double laboratory periods 
or field trips. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22. 

Studies in the identification of plants with emphasis on local flowering plants 
and their relationships. 

323. Elementary Plant Anatomy. Five two-hour laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Botany 21-22. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems of vascular plants, 
and a comparative study of the structure of roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. 

358. Methods in Plant Histology. Five double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Botany 21-22. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, staining, and 
mounting plant materials for microscopic study. 

375. Plant Ecology. Five double laboratory-discussion periods and field 
trips. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22. 

The relation of plants and plant communities to the environment in which they 
grow. 

380. Plant Physiology. Five double laboratory periods. Prerequisites: 
Botany 21-22. Breakage deposit, $2.50. 

A survey of physiological processes occurring in economic plants and the condi- 
tions which effect these processes. 

420. Field and Laboratory Botany. Two lectures and three double lab- 
oratory periods and special field trips. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22 or equiva- 
lent and two senior division courses in botany or education. 

A course in field botany designed especially for teachers and prospective teachers. 
Particular emphasis is placed upon the identification of local flowering plants and 
ferns, and upon the selection and use of materials for correlating the study of plants 
with other subjects. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 141 

431. Morphology of Seed Plants. Five double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Botany 323 and one other senior division course in botany or 
plant pathology. 

Critical studies of representative seed plants, considering their development and 
relationships. 

440. Cytology (See Biology 440). 
442. Cytogenetics (See Biology 442). 

471. Taxonomy of Seed Plants. Five double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Botany 305 and any other senior division course in botany or 
approved course in plant pathology, forestry, or geography. 

A study of the concepts and system of classification, problems of nomenclature, 
and the taxonomy of specialized groups. 

472. Taxonomy of Seed Plants (continued). Two lectures and three 
double laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Botany 471. 

A continuation of Botany 471. 

473. Agrostology. Five double laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Botany 
21-22 and two senior division courses in botany, or approved courses in plant 
pathology, agronomy, or forestry. 

A study of the grasses with emphasis on structure, classification, and ecological 
relationships. 

476. (Geography) Vegetation of North America. Four lectures and one 
two-hour laboratory period. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22, Botany 375, and 
one other senior division course in botany or acceptable course in geology 
and geography. 

A study of the past and present distribution of the major vegetation types in North 
America together with the analysis of the factors affecting this distribution. A study 
of indicator plants and land utilization is included. 

482. Nutrition of Green Plants. Two lectures and three double labora- 
tory periods. Prerequisites: Botany 323 and 380. Breakage deposit, $5. 

A study of the nutrition of the higher plants, including major and minor elements 
and deficiency symptoms. 

483. Advanced Plant Physiology. Five double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Botany 380 and any other senior division course in botany, chem- 
istry, or plant pathology. Breakage deposit, $5. 

An evaluation of accepted concepts in plant physiology with special attention to 
the methods employed in arriving at these concepts. 

802 and 804. Problems in Botany. 5 hours for each course. Under this 
heading work may be pursued under the direction of staff members in plant 
anatomy, plant ecology, plant morphology, plant physiology, plant taxonomy, 
or mycology. Prerequisites: two senior division courses in botany or ap- 
proved courses in agriculture, geography, or forestry. 

877. Ecological Anatomy. Three lectures and two two-hour laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22 and two senior division plant science 
courses. 

A study of relationships between plant structure and environment, including a de- 
tailed ecological classification of plants together with microscopic examination of the 
structure of representative examples of each type discussed and a consideration of 
genetic and somatic adaptations. 

CHEMISTRY 

(Terrell Hall or Chemistry Annex, North Campus; Conner Hall, South Cam- 
pus) 
Head: Scott. Staff: Brockman, Browning. Buess, Coggin. Philbrook. Smith. 
Spell, Whitehead, Wilder. 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

21, 22. General Chemistry. Four lectures or recitations and one labora- 
tory period per week each quarter. Breakage deposit, $5 for each course. 
The Staff and Assistants. 

The first course covers the chemistry of the non-metallic elements, including a 
systematic treatment of chemical principles and their applications. The second course 
is a continuation of the first course, including a general survey of the metallic ele- 
ments. 



142 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

370, 371. Industrial Chemistry. Five lectures per week each quarter. 
Prerequisites: 370 — Chemistry 22 and one other chemistry course with lab- 
oratory; 371 — Chemistry 346 or equivalent. Mr. Brockman. 

The first course covers important chemical processes and recent chemical develop- 
ments in various inorganic chemical industries. The second course deals with the 
important chemical processes and recent developments in various organic chemical 
industries. 

420, 421. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Five lectures or recitations per 
week each quarter. Prerequisites: 420 — Chemistry 22 and two other chemis- 
try courses with laboratory; 421 — Chemistry 23 and one other chemistry 
course with laboratory. Mr. Brockman or Mr. Whitehead. 

These courses comprise a comprehensive treatment of atomic structure, molecular 
structure and theories of valence: the second course emphasizes the periodicity 
of the chemical properties of the elements. 

422. Advanced Inorganic Preparations. One lecture and four laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Chemistry 22 and two other chemistry courses with 
laboratory. Breakage deposit, $5. Mr. Brockman. 

Selected syntheses of inorganic compounds. 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

23. Qualitative Inorganic Analysis. Two lectures or recitations and 
three laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 22. Breakage deposit, 
$5. Mr. Smith, Mr. Spell, Mr. Whitehead, Mr. Wilder, and Assistants. 

The fundamental theories of qualitative analysis and analyses of common cations 
and anions by semi-micro methods. 

380. Quantitative Inorganic Chemistry. Two lectures and three labora- 
tory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 23. Breakage deposit, $5. Mr. Spell, 
Mr. Whitehead, and Assistants. 

The fundamental theories of quantitative analysis and typical analyses involving 
volumetric and gravimetric methods. 

480, 482. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. One or two lectures and four 
or three laboratory periods per week each quarter. Prerequisites: 480 — 
Chemistry 380; 482— Chemistry 480 or 481. Breakage deposit, $10 ($5 each 
quarter). Mr. Spell, Mr. Whitehead, and Assistant. 

These courses cover more advanced work in quantitative analyses. They include 
systematic analyses, organic precipitants, potentiometric methods, electrolytic analy- 
ses, and microscopic methods. 

481. Commercl\l Analysis. One or two lectures and four or three labora- 
tory periods. Prerequisites: Chemistry 380 and 340a-b. Breakage deposit, 
$5. Mr. Spell, Mr. Whitehead, and Assistant. 

Qualitative and quantitative analyses of water, alcohols, sugars, nitrogen com- 
pounds, saponifiable oils and hydrocarbon products, using standard commercial 
methods. The theoretical basis of each method is given. 

483h, 484h. Instrumental Methods of Analysis. 3 hours each quarter. 
One lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Chemistry 380 and 
one year of physics. Breakage deposit, $5. Mr. Spell and Assistant. 

These courses cover the use of special instruments for analysis. These include 
refractometers, electrophotometers, spectrophotometers, polarograph, and electrical 
instruments. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 

(See College of Agriculture for these courses.) 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

340 a-b. Organic Chemistry. 10 hours. Three or four lectures or recita- 
tions and one or two laboratory periods each quarter. Prerequisite: A grade 
of 70 or better in Chemistry 21, 22. Breakage deposit, $10 ($5 each quarter). 
Mr. Bvess. Mr. Coggin, Mr. Philbrook, Mr. Scott, and Assistants. 

Chemistry 340a. The aliphatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives. 

Chemistry 340b. A continuation of 340a and a treatment of the coal tar compounds. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 1_43 

346. Elements of Organic Chemistry. (For agricultural and home eco- 
nomics students.) Four lectures or recitations and one laboratory period. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 22, or with consent of the Head of the Department. 
Breakage deposit, $5. Mr. Buess, Mr. Coggin, Mr. Philbrook, Mr. Wilder, and 
Assistants. 

A brief introduction to organic chemistry. 

440. Advanced Organic Preparations. One consultation and four labora- 
tory periods. Prerequisite: A grade of 80 or better in Chemistry 340a-b. 
Breakage deposit, $5. Mr. Scott and Mr. Philbrook. 

Selected syntheses, such as Grignard, Friedel and Craft. Acetoacetic ester and 
others : also oxidations, reductions, and condensations. 

441. Organic Qualitative Analysis. One consultation and four labora- 
tory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 440. Breakage deposit, $5. Mr. 
Scott and Mr. Philbrook. 

Identification of pure organic compounds and of mixtures. 

442. Organic Quantitative Analysis. One consultation and four labora- 
tory periods. Prerequisites: Chemistry 441 and 380. Breakage deposit, $5. 
Mr. Spell. 

Quantitative analysis of organic compounds for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and 
nitrogen by combustion : (the determination of halogens and sulfur by the bomb 
method. Both macro and micro methods are available. 

430h, 431h, 443h, 446h, 447h. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. 3 
hours each quarter. Three lectures or recitations. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
340b. Mr. Buess, Mr. Philbrook, or Mr. Scott. 

These courses deal with special topics in organic chemistry such as stereochemistry 
(430h), organic compounds of nitrogen (431h), alicyclic compounds (443h), organo- 
metallic compounds (446h), heterocyclic compounds (447h). 

444h. Physical Methods in Organic Chemistry. 3 hours. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Chemistry 340a-b, 490a-b, and 
440, or 422. Breakage deposit, $5. Mr. Philbrook. 

The application of special topics in physical chemistry, such as drying, melting 
point theory, boiling point theory, distillation, extraction, crystallization, and ab- 
sorption spectrophotometry, to the practice of Organic Chemistry. 

445h, 448h. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 3 hours each quarter. Three 
lectures or recitations. Prerequisite: Chemistry 340b. Mr. Philbrook or Mr. 
Scott. 

An advanced treatment of organic chemistry with special emphasis on theories, 
structure, and the mechanics of reactions. 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

390. Elements of Physical Chemistry. Five lectures or recitations. Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 23, 340a or 346, and general physics. Mr. Philbrook. 

A brief introduction to physical chemistry, designed primarily for pre-medical 
students. 

400. Colloid Chemistry. Three lectures and two laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 390, 340a or 346, and 380. Breakage deposit, $5. Mr. 
Whitehead. 

Fundamental theories of colloid chemistry with typical laboratory experiments. 

490 a-b-c. Physical Chemistry. 15 hours. Three or four lectures or reci- 
tations and one or two laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Chemistry 380, 
340a or 346, and Mathematics 355. Breakage deposit, $15 ($5 for each quar- 
ter). Mr. Philbrook. 

A three quarter course in the fundamental principles of physical chemistry and 
typical laboratory experiments. 

RESEARCH AND THESIS 

449. Introduction to Research. (Field to be inserted). One lecture and 
four library or laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Chemistry 422 or 441 or 
480 or 481 or 495h. Breakage deposit, $5. The Graduate Staff. 

An introduction to the literature of chemistry, research procedures, and directions 
which can be found only in original articles. 



144 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

900. Laboratory Research in Chemistry (Field to be inserted). 5 to 50 
hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 449. Breakage deposit, $5 per five hours 
credit. The Graduate Staff. 

930. Thesis in Chemistry. 5 to 50 hours. The Graduate Staff. 

CLASSICS 

(Robert E. Park Hall, North Campus) 

Head: Alexander. Staff: Kaplan. 

CLASSICAL CULTURE 

All courses in this section are given in English translation. 

301x. Classical Culture: Greece. Mr. Alexander. 

A study of the characteristics of Greek culture, made principally through transla- 
tions of selections from Greek authors. 

301y. Classical Culture: Rome. Mr. Kaplan. 

A study of the characteristics of Latin culture, made principally through transla- 
tions of selections from Latin authors. 

354. The Greek Romance. Mr. Alexander. (Offered in alternate years. 
Not offered in 1952-53.) 

Study of the Greek prose romantic narratives; emphasis placed on the influence 
of the Greek romance on medieval literature and the development of the novel. 

356. Homer and the Epic Tradition. Mr. Alexander. (Offered in alter- 
nate years. Not offered in 1952-53.) 

A detailed study of Homer and his influence in later European literature. 

357. Classical Drama. Mr. Alexander. (Offered in alternate years.) 
Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, studied through their in- 
fluence on later European literatures. 

358. Roman Literature in Translation. Mr. Kaplan. 

Detailed study of selected Latin authors with special emphasis on biography as a 
literary type. 

801. Greek Civilization. Prerequisite: ten hours of approved advanced 
courses in classics, modern languages, or literature; no knowledge of Greek 
required. Mr. Alexander. 

A survey of Greek civilization studied through literature in translation. Research 
problems in special subjects. 

802. Roman Civilization. Prerequisite: ten hours of approved advanced 
courses in classics, modern languages, or literature; no knowledge of Latin 
required. Mr. Alexander. 

A survey of Roman civilization studied through literature in translation. Research 
problems in special subjects. 

GREEK 
Freshmen may elect the three introductory courses to Greek. 

201-202. Elementary Greek. Mr. Alexander. 

A double course meeting for two quarters in the elements of the Greek language; 
study of Greek history, geography, and social customs. 

203. Readings in Greek. Prerequisites: Greek 201 and 202. Mr. Alexan- 
der. 

Selected readings from Greek authors. 

304. Homer. Prerequisites: Greek 201, 202. and 203 or equivalent. Mr. 
Alexander. 

Detailed study of selections from the Iliad or the Odyssey. 

LATIN 

Freshmen may elect the three introductory courses in Latin. Students 
offering two entrance units in Latin from high school may begin with Latin 
203. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 145 

201-202. Elementary Latin. Mr. Kaplan. 

A double course meeting for two quarters in the elements of the Latin language. 

203. Intermediate Latin. Prerequisites: Latin 201 and 202 or two high 
school units in Latin. Mr. Kaplan. 

Selected reading from standard Latin authors; drill on forms and syntax. 

304. Readings in Latin. Prerequisite: Latin 203 or equivalent. Mr. Kap- 
lan. 
Selected readings from standard Latin authors. Grammar, drill, and review. 

DRAMA 

(See Speech and Drama) 

ECONOMICS 

5x. Principles of Economics. The Staff. 

A description of critical analysis of the organization of modern society from an 
economic point of view, with a brief introduction to the theory of value and dis- 
tribution. 

This course is required of all sophomores in the College of Business Administra- 
tion and A.B. majors in Economics. It is elective as a social science for all other 
students and may be taken without 5y. 

5y. Problems of Economics. Prerequisite: Economics 5x. The Staff. 

Economic problems based upon the principles studied in 5x. Continuation of Eco- 
nomics 5x. 

This course is required of all sophomores in the College of Business Administra- 
tion and A.B. majors in Economics. 

These two courses (5x and oy) are prerequisite to all advanced courses in eco- 
nomics and business administration, except by special permission of the instructor. 

312. Elementary Economic Statistics. Mr. Sebba and the Staff. 

An introduction to the presentation and analysis of quantitative economic data. 
Statistical sources, table reading, chart making; elementary statistical procedures 
and their economic interpretations; introduction to index numbers and time series 
analysis. Laboratory assignments. 

326. Money and Banking. Mr. Sutton and the Staff. 

A study of the role of money in the economic organization; monetary theory; 
methods of stabilizing the price level; the integration of financial instructions; 
theories of bank deposits and elasticity of bank currency ; discount policy and the 
interest rate of central banks ; methods of regulating credit and business activities. 

333. American Economic History. Mr. Lorenz and the Staff. 

A survey of American economic development from the colonial period to the 
present; economic factors involved in American industrial growth and the resulting 
economic problems. 

334. Personal Finance. Mr. Sutton. 

A course in finance from the viewpoint of the individual. Deals with the principles 
and practices involved in buying on credit, borrowing money, saving money, bank re- 
lationships, buying government bonds, insurance, annuities, real estate, corporate 
bonds and stocks, investment company securities, and problems of taxation and wills. 

358. World Resources and Industries. Mr. Prunty. 

The relation of geographic factors to economic conditions in determining the 
nature and location of the several productive occupations; the distribution of the 
output of the occupations. Special emphasis is placed upon the role of economic 
geography in conditioning international affairs. 

360. Principles of Marketing Mr. Troelston and the Staff. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and services from 
producers to consumers ; marketing functions ; marketing manufactured goods, raw 
materials and agricultural products ;' proposals for improving the marketing struc- 
ture. 

361. Marketing Prorlems. Prerequisite: Economics 360. Mr. Troelston 
and the Staff. 

A course in marketing and merchandising problems. Emphasis is placed upon 
the influence of buyers and consumers on merchandise policy ; channels of distri- 
bution for consumer and industrial goods; brand policy; marketing organization 
and control methods ; price policies and legislative regulation and diagnosis of mar- 
keting policies. 



146 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

380. Economics and the Individual Firm. Prerequisite: The Core Curricu- 
lum. Mr. Gates. 

The application of economic analysis to the determination of company policy in- 
cluding the functions of an economic system; national income; economic fluctuations; 
business forecasting; risks and insurance; analysis and measurement of demand; 
behavior of costs and price determination; competitive strategy; and capital bud- 
geting. 

386. Labor Economics. Mr. Segrest and the Staff. 

A survey of wages, working conditions, unemployment, hours, workers' welfare 
plans, labor legislation, labor organization and current developments in labor. 

406. Advanced Economic Theory. Mr. Smith. 

Designed especially for majors in economics. Application of theoretical tools to 
value, distribution, money, business fluctuations, and the relationships between 
government and business. 

421. Punched-Card Statistics. Prerequisites: Business Administration 
315 and an introductory course in statistics. 

The use of punch-card machines in the treatment of numerical data ; preparing sta- 
tistical surveys in a form suitable for machine use in the processing of the data ; princi- 
ples and devices which facilitate the use of machines ; use of tables in the form of 
pre-punched cards. The students will carry out a complete cooperative statistical pro- 
ject, from the planning to the report stage, with main emphasis on modern computa- 
tional methods. 

432. Fundamentals of Investment Banking. Prerequisite: Economics 
326. Mr. Sutton. 

A study of the economics of investment banking; private investment banking ma- 
chinery ; and institutional investment banking. 

434. Public Finance. Mr. Brooks. 

A general consideration of American public expenditures, revenues, and fiscal ad- 
ministration. 

435. State and Local Public Finance. Prerequisite: Economics 434. Mr. 
Brooks. 

A detailed treatment of the revenues, expenditures, and fiscal administration of 
Georgia and its political subdivisions; fiscal comparisons of Georgia with other 
states; and an analysis of intergovernmental tax relationships. 

436. Business Cycles. Mr. Sebba and Mr. Smith. 

An analysis of the economic and social significance of business fluctuations ; causes 
of business cycles ; measures for controlling cycles ; the possibilities of business 
forecasting. 

437. Comparative Economic Systems. Mr. Lorenz and Mr. Smith. 

A critical analysis and appraisal of the theories underlying economic systems, in- 
cludng the directed economies and economic planning. A comparison of proposed and 
existing schemes, with respect to the maintenance of full employment, distribution of 
income, and encouragement of progress. 

441. Principles of Public Administration. Mr. Collins and Mr. Hughes. 
A study of administrative organization, relationships, and controls in the United 

States. 

442. Public Personnel Administration. Mr. Collins and Mr. Hughes. 

A study of civil service systems, their organization, procedure, and relationship. 

443. Public Financial Administration. Mr. Collins and Mr. Hughes. 

A study of the budgeting process, preparation and enactment of the budget, finan- 
cial accountability and the audit. 

444. Government and Business. Mr. Smith. 

A general survey of the economic aspects of business regulation by the government, 
with specific reference to regulatory developments and methods in the United States; 
other activities affecting business in general, as extension of loans and subsidies, 
maintenance of fact-finding agencies and government-owned corporations. 

450. Monetary Policy. Prerequisite: Economics 326. Mr. Sutton. 
An advanced treatment of problems introduced in Economics 326; emphasis is 
placed on recent changes in our monetary and banking systems. 

455. Contemporary Economic Problems. Mr. Smith and the Staff. 

The application of economic theory to certain problems of contemporary economic 
life, such as the problems of monopoly and its regulations, federal regulations and 
control in general, business cycles, protective tariffs, public finance, inflationary 
influences, and industrial conflict. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 147 



459. Economic Geography of the World. 

Economic and regional geography of Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, with a 
brief survey of the social, political and historical geography of major regions. 

465. Marketing Research and Analysis. Prerequisite: Economics 361. 
Mr. Troelston. 

The scientific method in the construction of general marketing research studies 
and in the solution of specific distribution problems ; qualitative market analyses ; 
market trends ; dealer analysis, data collection, tabulation and interpretation. 

466. Economics of Consumption. Mr. Troelston. 

A study of the economics of the consumer market; the process of consumption, with 
special emphasis on factors that determine it ; the position and responsibilities of the 
consumer; desirable controls of consumption. 

475. Economics of Transportation. Mr. Bunting. 

A study of the economic principles of transportation with special emphasis on 
the history and regulation of railroads. 

Majors in aeronautical administration will be required to complete additional as- 
signments in air transportation. 

477. Public Utilities. Mr. Bunting and Mr. Smith. 

A description of development, characteristics, rights, and duties of public utilities 
with special emphasis on the problem of regulation and rates, service, securities, 
holding companies, etc., in the electric utilities. Special consideration is given to 
activities of the Federal government in the power field. 

480. International Trade. Mr. Lorenz and Mr. Smith. 

An examination of the economic importance and problems of international trade. 
An analysis of the theory of international trade is presented as a tool to be used 
in the consideration of the international problems of exchange rates and monetary 
standards, tariffs, and other trade barriers, debts, and the position of international 
trade in the post-war world. 

485. Personnel Administration. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and Eco- 
nomics 386. Mr. Roman and Mr. Segrest. 

The principles and practices in the field of the administration of human relations 
in industry. Emphasis is given to scientific techniques and devices in the develop- 
ment of a well-rounded personnel program. 

489. The Labor Movement. Prerequisite: Economics 386. Mr. Segrest. 

An historical background of modern industrial relations: a study of the prin- 
cipal economic, social and political forces contributing to the current problems in 
the field of labor economics. 

490. Labor Legislation. Prerequisite: Economics 386. Mr. Segrest. 
A study of state and federal legislation in the field of industrial relations. 

491. Applied Economic Statistics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 356 or Eco- 
nomics 312 and consent of major professor. Mr. Sebba. 

Various statistical methods and techniques applied to economic fields such as 
marketing, advertising, labor management, production, banking, investments. 

492. American Administrative Law. Mr. Saye. 

This course stresses the legal principles and practical doctrines involved in work 
of administrative tribunals (the Interstate Commerce Commission. Federal Trade Com- 
mission, Securities and Exchange Commissions, etc.). vested with quasi-legislative or 
quasi-judicial powers, or both. It includes also a study of the Social Security Program 
at both the State and National level. 

494. European Economic History. Mr. Lorenz. 

The development of the economic aspects of civilization in medieval and modern 
times : the evolution of economic institutions ; the historical background of present 
economic problems. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

(Students interested in graduate work in economics should write to the 
Graduate School for a complete list of graduate offerings. The courses listed 
below are available for graduate students only. Courses numbered in the 
400 series and listed in this bulletin are offered jointly to graduate and 
undergraduate students). 

Economics 807. The History of Economic Thought. Mr. Brooks. 

A review of the history of economic theory. The evolution of the important prin- 
ciples of economics, with emphasis laid on the history of the theories of value and 
distribution. Permission of the instructor required. 



148 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Economics 844. Seminar in Government and Business. Mr. Smith. 
A study of current issues in the field of governments' relation to business with 
particular emphasis on problems associated with monopoly and competition. 

Economics 850. Research in Money and Banking. Mr. Sutton. 
Individual research in money and banking. Permission of the instructor required. 

Economics 860. Seminar in Marketing and Sales Administration. Mr. 
Troelston. 

Sales and marketing problems with emphasis upon current developments in whole- 
sale and retail agencies. Individual problems are selected in line with the training 
and interest of each student. Permission of the instructor required. 

Economics 886. Problems in Industrial Relations. Mr. Segrest. 

A study of current problems in industrial relations with particular emphasis on the 
current status of unionism in the United States in terms of the effects of union or- 
ganization, policies and methods upon employer-employee relations. 

Economics 890. Index Numbers. Prerequisites: Economics 312, Economics 
491, and one senior economics course. Mr. Sebba. 

Index number construction arid interpretation; a survey of the most important 
index numbers currently used in economic statistics. 

Economics 891. Research in Applied Economic Statistics. Mr. Sebba. 
Individual research in the application of statistical methods to economic problems. 
Permission of the instructor required. 

Economics 892. Time Series Analysis. Prerequisites: Economics 312, 491, 
436. Mr. Sebba. 
A study of statistical time series analysis and its application to economic analysis. 

Economics 893. Economics Seminar. The Staff. 

A research problem in the field of major concentration under personal supervision 
of the major professor. Permission of the instructor required. 

ENGLISH 
(Robert E. Park Hall, North Campus) 

Head: Everett. Staff: Appleby, Beaumont, Brown, Davidson, Doster, Dumas, 

Eidson, Huff, Hutcherson, E. R. McWhorter, H. B. McWhorter, Palmour, 

Parks, Tate, Tison, Walker, Wall, Wallis, West. 

English 2 x-y and English 22 x-y are prerequisite to all other English 
courses. 

2 x-y. Composition. 10 hours (5 hours a quarter). Miss Dumas and the 
Staff. 

First quarter: grammar, punctuation, mechanics, diction, and sentence structure. 

Second quarter: readings from English and American literature. Themes and 
parallel reading required throughout the course. Conferences on themes and reading. 

6. Oral and Written Composition. Miss Dumas and the Staff. 
Required of students in agriculture and agricultural engineering. 

22 x-y. European Literature. 10 hours (5 hours a quarter). Prerequi- 
site: English 2 x-y. Mr. West and the Staff. 
A survey of European literature from Homer to the twentieth century. 

303. English Literature to 1800. Mr. Wall. 

A general course in English literature designed to give any student a broad 
knowledge of the subject. English 303 and English 304 together offer a full survey of 
English literature, but either or both of these courses may be taken. They are ur- 
gently recommended for students who intend to major in English. 

304. English Literature After 1800. Mr. Wall. 
Continuation of English 303. 

305. Lyric Poetry. Mr. Davidson. 

A study of the types, techniques, and interpretations of poems selected from Eng- 
lish and American literature. 

310. Advanced Grammar and Syntax. This course is recommended to 
students interested in teaching or in writing. Miss Dumas. 

343. Contemporary Drama. Mr. West. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 149 

359. The English Ballad. Mr. Walker and Mr. Hodgson jointly. 
This course concerns itself with both texts and music. 

361. The Short Story. Mr. Eidson. 

A history of the short story as a literary form. 

375. History of the English Novel. Mrs. McWhorter. 

380. The Modern Novel. Mrs. McWhorter. 

400. Old English. Mr. Brown. 

A study of the language and literature of England before the Norman Conquest, 
with reading of selected texts. 

402. Chaucer. Mr. Brown. 

A study of the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and minor poems. 

403. Milton. Mr. Davidson. 

A study of the work and times of John Milton. 

404. The Age of Pope. Mr. Davidson. 

A study of the works of Pope, Defoe, Addison, Steele, and Swift. 

405. The Age of Johnson. Miss Dumas. 

A study of the works of Samuel Johnson and his most important contemporaries. 

406. The Romantic Movement. Mr. Everett. 

A study of the major poets of the early nineteenth century. 

407. The English Drama to 1642. Mr. West. 

A study of the English drama (exclusive of Shakespeare) from the beginning to 
the closing of the theatres. 

409. Elizabethan Poetry. Mr. West. 

A study of the Elizabethan non-dramatic poets from Spenser to Donne. 

410. History of the English Language. Mr. Brown. 

The development of English from its beginning to the present time. 

420. American Literature to 1865. Mr. Eidson and Mr. Parks. 
A survey of literary works and the main intellectual currents. 

422. American Literature after 1865. Mr. Eidson and Mr. Parks. 

425. Romanticism in American Literature. Mr. Eidson and Mr. Parks. 
(Not offered in 1952-53.) 
A study of the works of Emerson. Whitman, and Hawthorne. 

427. Realism in American Literature. Mr. Eidson and Mr. Parks. 

A study of the works of Mark Twain, Henry James, and William Dean Howelle. 

429. Southern Literature. Mr. Eidson and Mr. Parks. 

A survey of the intellectual thought and literary achievement in the South from 
1610 to the present time, with emphasis upon Poe, Timrod, and Lanier. 

440. Shakespeare to 1600. Mr. Walker. 

Romeo and Juliet; A Midsummer Night's Dream; The Merchant of Venice; King 
Richard the Second; King Henry the Fourth, Part I; Much Ado About Nothing; As 
You Like It ; Hamlet. 

441. Shakespeare after 1600. Mr. Walker. 

Twelfth Night; Macbeth; King Lear; Antony and Cleopatra; Coriolanus; The 
Winter's Tale; The Tempest. 

442. Early Victorian Literature. Mr. Everett. 

A study of the works of Carlyle, Tennyson, and Browning. 

451. Music and Literature. Mr. Brown. 

A comparative study of the forms, relationships, and aesthetics of music and 
literature. Admission by consent of the instructor. 

452. Late Victorian Literature. Mr. Everett. 

A study of the works of Arnold, Ruskin, and Swinburne. 



150 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

FINE ARTS 

(Fine Arts Building, North Campus ) 

Given under the general direction of the Chairman of the Division of 
Fine Arts. 

300. Music axd the Visual Abts. No credit will be allowed for Fine Arts 
300 when credit is already shown for Art 317 and Music 343. Mr. Dodd and 
Mr. Hodgson. 

Nature and materials of the visual arts in their relation to man, with emphasis 
on the influence of art products in contemporary living and thinking. A field of 
study comprising painting, sculpture, architecture, graphic arts, arts of industry 
and commerce. Also a study of works of outstanding figures in music taken chrono- 
logically. 

FRENCH 

(See Modern Foreign Languages) 

GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

(LeConte Hall, North Campus) 
Head: Prunty. Staff: Barnes, Hart, Lahey, Mather, Parizek, Zelinsky. 

HUMAN AND REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY 

Note: Courses listed below carry credit as social sciences and a major 
selected primarily from the following courses leads to an A.B. degree. 

101. World Human Geography. Mr. Mather and the Staff. 

A survey of world human geography, emphasizing population characteristics, dis- 
tribution of economic activities and geo-political problems within the major natural 
regions. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the regions of Eurasia as a basis 
for appreciation of international affairs. 

352. Geography of Anglo-America. Prerequisite: Geography 101 or His- 
tory 110 x-y. Mr. Mather. 

A regional analysis of the human geography of the United States, Canada, Alaska, 
and the continental possessions of Britain, emphasizing the physical and economic 
factors affecting the utilization of the several regions. Particular stress will be given 
the Southeastern States. 

358. Economic Geography. Prerequisite: Geography 101, History 110 x-y, 
or one course in Economics. Mr. Prunty. 

Study of the relation of geographical and geological factors to economic conditions 
in influencing the nature, volume of production, and location of the various basic 
productive occupations. Stress upon raw materials. Emphasis upon resources and 
industries of the U. S. Southeast, their actual and potential development. Concluding 
section on role of geographical and geological factors in influencing international 
trade. 

365. Geography of Southeast Asia. Prerequisite: Geography 101 or 
History 110 x-y. Mr. Zelinsky. 

A regional analysis of the physical geography and problems in the economic and 
political geography of Southeast Asia. Emphasis on Japan, China, and India. 

436. Human and Resource Geography of the Southeastern United 
States. Prerequisite: Ten hours in courses from one of the following de- 
partments: Geography and Geology, History, or Economics. Mr. Prunty or 
Mr. Zelinsky. 

Geographical appraisal of the regions of the Southeastern States, including (1) 
physical resources — geology, landforms, soils, climates, economic minerals, original 
vegetation, and (2) human geography of the South emphasizing aboriginal settle- 
ment, sources of settlement and population, agriculture, the extractive industries, 
transportation, and present urban settlements. Concluding section of course sum- 
marizes major problems of Southeastern development and suggests geographical 
approaches to their solution. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 151 



441. Caribbean America. 3 hours. Prerequisite: 10 hours in Geography 
and Geology, or an equivalent background in either Spanish or History. Mr. 
Lahey or Mr. Prunty. 

A regional analysis of the geography of the Caribbean Area with emphasis upon 
the cultural and economic ties of the American South with the Caribbean area. This 
course will meet on alternate days with Geography 442— SOUTH AMERICA— and 
should be taken in the same quarter with Geography 442. 

442. South America. 3 hours. Prerequisite: 10 hours in Geography and 
Geology, or an equivalent background in either Spanish or History. Mr. 
Mather. 

A regional analysis of the geography of equatorial and southern South America 
including treatment of physical, cultural, and economic characteristics of the several 
regions within the South American nations. Stress upon prospects for expansion of 
settlements, developments of resources and growth of industries. This course will 
meet on alternate days with Geography 441— CARIBBEAN AMERICA— and should 
be taken in the same quarter with Geography 441. 

444. Europe and the Mediterranean. Prerequisite: 10 years in Geogra- 
phy and Geology, or an equivalent background in History or Modern Lan- 
guages. Mr. Hart. 

A regional analysis of the human geography of penisular, western, and central 
Europe, and the Mediterranean Basin, emphasizing physical, ethnographic, and 
economic factors affecting the utilization and political problems of the several nations. 

446. Geography of the Soviet Union. Prerequisite: 10 hours in Geography 
and Geology, or an equivalent background in Modern Languages or History. 
Mr. Hart. 

A regional analysis of the physical, ethnographic and economic geography of the 
U.S.S.R., designed to evaluate the industrial and political strength of the Soviet 
Union. 

TECHNIQUES AND METHODS IN GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

350. Cartography and Graphics. Five laboratory periods. Mr. Hart or 
Mr. Zelinsky. 

Theory and practice in map and chart design and construction. Emphasis on com- 
pilation techniques, use of source data for map construction, application of aerial 
photos to mapping problems, graphic presentation of statistical materials. Includes 
practice in use of all basic cartographic instruments, construction of basic types of 
geographical, geological, and statistical maps. Intended for the student who has had 
no training in mapping or drafting procedures. 

420. Use and Interpretation of Aerial Photographs. Two lectures and 
three laboratory periods. Prerequisites: 4 or more quarters of forestry or 
agriculture, Geography 350 and one other 300 level course, or permission of 
the instructor. Mr. Hart or Mr. Zelinsky. 

Theory and procedures in use of aerial photos for mapping, planning, terrain and 
contour identification, forest and vegetation identification. Procedures in correction 
of photo errors, for preparation of base-maps, will be stressed. Training in use of 
standard photogrammetric instruments, and in planning photo-n connaisance of 
sample areas. 

421. Advanced Cartography Laboratory. Five laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisite: Geography 350 or 420, or the equivalent. Mr. Zelinsky. 

Laboratory instruction on individualized, cartographic or graphic problems re- 
lated to major interests of student. Recommended for students, in fields other than 
geography, whose subject-areas can be enhanced by cartographic procedures. 

422. Advanced Photogkammetry Laboratory. Five laboratory periods. 
Prerequisite: Geography 420 or equivalent. Mr. Zelinsky. 

Laboratory instruction on individualized photogrammetric problems related to 
the major interests of the student. Recommended for students, in fields other than 
geography, to which photogrammetry applies, such as forestry, agronomy, agricul- 
tural engineering, botany, landscape architecture, geology. Students will be required 
to acquire mastery of advanced photogrammetric instruments. 

425. Field Methods in Geography and Geology. 3 hours. Prerequisites: 
15 hours in Geography and Geology courses numbered above 200 including 
Geography 350, plus at least a B average in junior-senior major courses. Mr. 
Lahey and the Staff. 

Methods in measurement, observation, recording, and synthesis of field data in 
Geography and Geology. Field analysis of all features in one small tvpe-area re- 
quired, including completed maps of publication standard and written report in which 
recorded data are correlated and synthesized. 



152 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

429. Aeea Analysis Methods in Resource Development. 3 hours. Pre- 
requisite: 10 hours in courses numbered above 200 in Geography and Geology, 
or in Economics, or equivalent. Background in cartography or statistics is 
very desirable. Mr. Prunty and the Staff. 

Semi-independent application of area-analysis techniques to selected problems in 
the development of mineral properties, or raw-material producing regions, to indus- 
trial plant locations, and to location and evaluation of market regions. Analysis prob- 
lems will be selected to fit individual student interests. 

800. Seminar in Geographical Methods. 2 hours. Mr. Prunty. 

Required for graduate majors in geography. Research methods and aids, philosophi- 
cal basis of geographical methods, contemporary problems in geographical methods 
principally as related to regional and economic geography. 

GEOLOGY AND PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 

Note: Courses listed below carry credit as physical sciences. Courses 
4, 121, 122, and 310 do not carry laboratory science credit. A major select- 
ed primarily from the following courses leads to a B.S. degree and must 
include a minimum of 20 hours in Geology credit courses. 

4. Earth Science Survey. Mr. Hart and the Staff. 

A survey of fundamental concepts and contributions selected from the fields of 
physical geography (physiography, climatology), physical and historical geology. 

25. Elements of Geology (Physical). Three lectures and two laboratory 
periods. Mr. Lahey and the Staff. 

Fundamentals of physical geology, including origin and composition of the pri- 
mary earth materials, agents of erosion, sedimentation, metamorphism, modes of 
occurrence of the common economic minerals, and analysis of the common crustal 
structures. 

26. Elements of Geology (Historical). A continuation of Geology 25. 
Three lectures and two laboratory periods. Mr. Parizek and the Staff. 

Historical principles in geology, including floral, faunal, bio-geographic, and 
stratigraphic relationships of the several geologic epochs. 

121. The Natural Environment (Physical Geography). Mr. Hart and 
the Staff. 

A systematic analysis of major features of the natural environment and their 
interrelations, stressing common rocks, land forms, geomorphic and water-resource 
characteristics within the major landforms, distribution and characteristics of the 
major residual soils types. 

122. The Natural Environment (Physical Geography). A continuation 
of Geography 121. Mr. Lahey and the Staff. 

Evaluation of weather fundamentals, climatic, vegetative, and water-resource 
phenomena, and their ecological relationships within the physical environment as 
illustrated by selected areas. 

310. Conservation of Natural Resources. Mr. Mather or Mr. Prunty. 

Resource problems and related conservation techniques in the United States. Par- 
ticular emphasis placed upon resource conservation problems of the Southeastern 
States. 

321. Mineralogy and Crystallography. 3 hours. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Geology 25-26. Mr. Parizek. 

Physical and chemical properties of minerals, their rock-associations, modes of 
occurrence, industrial uses. Properties of crystals, crystal systems and geometrical 
characteristics, abnormalities in mineral-crystal structure. 

323. Petrology. 3 hours. One lecture and two laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisite: Geology 321. Mr. Parizek. 

Origins of the sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks, modes of occurrence, 
chemical and physical changes to which rocks are subject. Systematic and descrip- 
tive analysis of rocks. 

332. Structural Geology. 3 hours. One lecture and two laboratory peri- 
ods. Prerequisite: Geology 25-26. Mr. Prunty. 

Framework of the earth's crust, and causes of its distortion. Analysis of flexures, 
faults, joints. Origin of mountains, continents, and oceans. Laboratory studies of 
geological maps and the deduction of earth forces resulting in present rock attitudes. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 153 

334. Principles of Sedimentation. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Geology 323. 
Mr. Parizek. 

Study of processes whereby sedimentary rocks are formed, media and agents of 
transportation, chemical and' physical factors involved in deposition, and environ- 
mental conditions causing variations in above processes. Special emphasis upon out- 
standing present areas of sedimentation, e.g., Gulf of Mexico. 

401. Regional Climatology and Vegetation. Four lecture and one labora- 
tory periods. Prerequisite: 10 hours in Geography and Geology including 
Geography 122, or an equivalent background in Botany. Mr. Lahey. 

Analysis of world climatic and vegetative regions involving such deterministic 
factors as air mass characteristics, heat and moisture requirements of vegetative 
associations, the influences of topographic and edaphic conditions upon the relations 
of climates to natural and cultivated vegetation. Application of the classification 
systems of Transeau, Koppen, and Thornthwaite required. 

402. Geomorphology. Four lecture and one laboratory periods. Prere- 
quisite: 10 hours in Geography and Geology, or an equivalent background. 
Mr. Mather. 

Analysis of processes which have developed present relief of the earth's surface, 
study of physical landscapes which comprise the earth's outer layers. Evaluation 
of relief features found in the major physiographic regions of the American South- 
east. Other physiographic regions, selected on a world-wide basis, examined as type- 
examples. 

403. Invertebrate Paleontology. Three lecture and two laboratory peri- 
ods weekly. Prerequisite: Geology 26 and 332, plus Zoology 26, or equivalent 
background. Mr. Parizek. 

Study of fossil invertebrates, emphasizing relationships in anatomical structures 
of living and extinct types, analysis of the classifications, ecology, and geological 
history of all phyla of invertebrates. Laboratory problems emphasizing facility in 
stereo-microscopic analysis. 

404. Principles of Stratigraphy. 3 hours. Two lecture and one labora- 
tory periods weekly. Prerequisite: Ten hours in Geography and Geology, 
including Geology 332. Mr. Parizek. 

Arrangements of strata of rocks in the earth's crust, emphasizing the vertical se- 
quences and lateral correlations of layered deposits. Particular attention to the 
methods involved in identification and correlation of typical stratigraphic associa- 
tions through analysis of organic and structural constituents. 

406. Advanced Historical Geology. Four lecture and one laboratory 
periods weekly. Prerequisite: 10 hours in Geography and Geology, including 
Geology 332. Mr. Parizek. 

Principles of paleontological analysis of strata, emphasizing the bio-geographic 
characteristics typical of geological periods in Eastern North America. Special at- 
tention to the index fossils and the place of organisms in the growth of strata. 

476. Vegetation of Xortii America. (See Botany 476.) 

GERMAN 

(See Modern Foreign Languages) 

GREEK 

(See Classics) 

HISTORY 

(Academic Building, North Campus) 

Head: Coulter. Staff: Brandon, Jones, Martin, Montgomery, Nichols, Smith, 

Thompson, Vinson. 

110 x-y. History of Western Civilization. 10 hours (5 hours in each 
of two quarters). For sophomores. Mrs. Brandon, Mr. Jones, Mr. Mont- 
gomery, Mr. Nichols, and Mr. Vinson. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the development of the institu- 
tions of the Western World and to show how they became a part of modern civiliza- 
tion. This course must be taken in the sequence indicated. 



154 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

History 110 is prerequisite to all courses which follow. 

310. History of the Far East. Mr. Vinson. 

A survey of Oriental history with special emphasis on the role of China and 
Japan in world affairs during the last two centuries. 

325. Ancient History. Mr. Jones. 

A survey of the political, social, and economic world from the Stone Age to the 
end of the Western Roman Empire in 476 A.D. 

330. Europe since 1914. 

A study of the causes, main phases, and results of the First and Second World 
Wars, the chief political, economic, social, and cultural problems of the countries 
of Europe between these two wars, and the chief problems of these countries since 
1945. 

350 x-y. American History. 10 hours (5 hours in each of two quarters). 
Open only to juniors and seniors. Mrs. Brandon, Mr. Martin, Mr. Mont- 
gomery, and Mr. Vinson. 

An interpretation of the development of the American nation from the age of 
discovery down to the present. 

360. Russia and the Soviet Union. (Not offered in 1952-53.) 
A survey covering the history of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics from 
the earliest beginnings of Russian civilization in the ninth century to the present 
time. The first half of the course is devoted to the growth of the Russian Empire 
and its institutional development before 1800; the second half, to the decline of 
imperial Russia in the nineteenth century and the development of the Soviet regime 
after the 1917 Revolution. 

405. Constitutional History of the United States. Mr. Montgomery. 
A study of how actual political and social conditions in American history have pro- 
duced fundamental constitutional principles and practices. 

420. Nineteenth Century Europe. Mr. Jones. 

A history of Europe from 1814 to 1914. The main political, international, social, 
economic, cultural, and intellectual movements will be stressed. 

451. The American Colonies. Mr. Martin. 

A study of the early settlements made in North America by the English, French, 
Spanish, and Dutch; and how these European peoples made an American society 
by adapting old world forces to a new world environment. The course ends with the 
French and Indian War in 1763 . 

452. The Revolution and the Rise op the American Nation. Mr. Martin. 
This course covers the period of American history from 1763 to 1800, which includes 

the Revolution, its causes and results; the Articles of Confederation; the writing and 
adoption of the Federal Constitution ; and the administrations of George Washington 
and John Adams. 

453. The Middle Period of American History. Mr. Montgomery. 

This course covers the period in American history from the election of Thomas 
Jefferson in 1800 to the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860. The development of the 
political, social, and economic factors is traced. 

454. The Civil War Period of American History. Mr. Coulter. 

Special attention will be given to the civilian activities of the people, and to the 
problems of the Northern and Southern governments. Emphasis will be placed on 
the Confederacy. Only the major military campaigns will be considered. 

455. The Reconstruction Period. Mr. Coulter. 

The reconstruction of the South along all lines as well as the remaking of the 
North will be taken up in this course. Beginnings will be found during the Civil W T ar 
and the process will be continued to 1877. 

456. Recent American History. Mr. Martin. 

Beginning with the presidency of Rutherford B. Hayes in 1877, this course will 
continue to 1900. Politics will be overshadowed by the social and economic picture. 

457. The Ante-Bellum South. Mr. Coulter. 

This course begins with the late colonial period, when settlers were pushing across 
the Southern Appalachians, and continues to the secession of the South. All aspects 
of Southern life and civilization will be dealt with. 

458. History of American Diplomacy. Mr. Vinson. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the part the United States has 
played in its relations with other nations and to show the contributions it has made 
in promoting international morality and the ideals of American democracy abroad. 

459. History of Georgia. Mr. Coulter. 

A study of Georgia from its first occupation by the Spaniards down to the pres- 
ent, though emphasis will be placed on the period before the present century. A 
comprehensive discussion of all aspects of Georgia's development. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 155 

473. The Tudor Period of English History. Mr. Tate (English Depart- 
ment). 

The reigns of Henry VII, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary, and Elizabeth are studied 
in detail, covering the period from 1485 to 1603. 

474. The Stuart Period of English History. Mr. Tate (English Depart- 
ment). 

This course covers the period from 1603 to 1714. and includes the following sover- 
eigns : James I, Charles I, Charles II. James II. William and Mary, and Anne. 
Emphasis is placed on the controversy between the king and parliament and on the 
development of religious and political affairs. 

476. Age of Reason and the French Revolution, 1660-1815. 

A history of Western Europe in the eighteenth century, centered on France in the 
Age of Enlightenment, showing how the French Revolution of 1789-1804 was the 
climax of gradual decay of one political, social, economic, and intellectural system. 
and replacement by another. 

477. Medieval Europe. Mr. Jones. 

The history of Europe from the Fall of Rome to the Renaissance. The topics 
covered include the barbarian invasions, rise of the national states, the growing 
power of the Catholic church and its struggle with the temporal rulers, feudalism, 
the Crusades, as well as the social and literary development during the period. 

478. The Renaissance and Reformation. Mr. Jones. (Not offered in 
1952-53.) 

A study of the transition from medieval conditions with emphasis on the social, 
economic, and cultural changes of the Renaissance and the great religious upheaval 
of the sixteenth century. 

491. The Latin-American Colonies. Mr. Nichols. 

This course begins with the voyages of discovery and covers the period of coloniza- 
tion and exploitation of the colonies by Spain and Portugal and ends with the Wars 
of Independence. 

492. The Latin-American Republics. Mr. Nichols. 

A course devoted to the study of the Latin-American Republics from the time 
of their independence down to the present clay. 

495. The United States in World Affairs, since 1900. Miss Thompson. 

The emergence of the United States into an important place in world affairs at the 
beginning of the twentieth century, its economic and cultural development as a world 
power, and the part it played in World Wars I and II. 

800. Historical Method and Bibliography. Mr. Coulter. 

Required of graduate students majoring in history. This course will include methods 
of research and various aids, as well as the generally accepted usages in historical 
composition. Also, it will take up a survey of the history of historical writing. 

801. Research Topics in American History. Members of the Department 
on the Graduate Faculty. 

Topics will vary from year to year. This course continues through two quarters. 

HUMAN BIOLOGY 

(See Biology) 

ITALIAN 
(See Modern Foreign Languages) 

LATIN 

(See Classics) 

MATHEMATICS 
(LeConte Hall, North Campus) 

Head: Fort. Staff: Barrow, Beckwith, Cohen, DuVal, Hill, Huff. Levit, 

Stanley. 

99. Remedial Course in Algebra. 3 hours. The Staff. 

A course designed for students who have had insufficient high school preparation 
to enter 101 or who for other reasons are deficient in their mathematics; devoted to 
drill on elementary and intermediate algebra ; meets five times per week although 
but three hours credit is given. 



156 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

lOlx. College Algebra. Prerequisite: at least two units of high school 
mathematics including one year of algebra. The Staff. 

Review of some elementary algebra, quadratic equations, binominal theorem, pro- 
gressions, complex numbers, theory of equations, permutations and combinations. 

101y. Trigonometry. Prerequisite: at least two units in high school mathe- 
matics, including one year of Algebra. The Staff. 
Trigonometry with some study of probability and statistics. 

102. Mathematics of Finance. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics lOlx. 
The Staff. 

Simple interest and discount, compound interest, annuities, sinking funds, amortiza- 
tion, bonds, building and loan associations. 

110. Analytical Geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 x-y. The Staff. 
The straight line, circle, and conic sections with some solid analytic geometry. 

303. Mathematics of Life Insurance. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 102. The Staff. 

Pure endowments, life annuities, whole life insurance, annual premiums, term in- 
surance, endowment insurance, reserves surrender values, loading. 

354. Calculus. Prerequisite: Mathematics 110. The Staff. 

A beginning course in differential calculus with some integrations, infinite series. 

355. Calculus. A continuation of Mathematics 354. The Staff. 
Integral calculus and other more advanced topics. 

356. Statistics. Prerequisite: Mathematics lOlx. Mr. Cohen. 
An elementary course in statistics. 

401. Differential Equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 355. Mr. Bar- 
row. 

Elementary differential equations with applications to geometry and physics. 

402. Vector Analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 355. Mr. Barrow. 
A study of vector methods and their physical applications. 

410. Fundamental Ideas of Algebra. Prerequisite for Graduate credit: 
Mathematics 101 x-y and either two mathematics courses numbered over 300 
or two years of teaching high school algebra. Graduate credit will be al- 
lowed toward the Master of Education degree only. Mr. Huff. 

A course designed to help teachers of high school algebra. It will stress those 
fundamental ideas, some of which are modern, which determine the structure of ele- 
mentary algebra. It will cover such topics as: construction of number systems; theory 
of divisibility for integers and polynomials; elements of counting; matrices and 
determinants. The subject matter and the method of presentation will be determined 
by the primary goal of the course. Mathematical arguments will be introduced at 
every opportunity. 

412. College Geometry. Prerequisite for Graduate credit: Mathematics 
lOlx-y and two years of teaching high school geometry. Summer quarter 
only. Mr. Barrow or Mr. Huff. 

A course in more advanced elementary geometry especially designed for prospective 
teachers of secondary school mathematics. 

431. Theory of Numbers. Prerequisite: Mathematics 355. Mr. Levit. 
Divisibility, prime numbers, congruences and residues, continued fractions. 

441. Introduction to Higher Algebra. Prerequisite: Mathematics 355. 
Mr. Huff or Mr. Levit. 

Theory of equations, polynomials, and determinants. 

442. Introduction to Higher Algebra. Prerequisite: Mathematics 355. 
Mr. Huff or Mr. Levit. 

Matrices, invariants, theory of elimination, symmetric functions. 

451. Mathematical Statistics. Prerequisites: Mathematics 355 and 356. 
Mr. Cohen. 

The mathematical theory of statistical methods, probability, and sampling distri- 
butions. 

452. Mathematical Statistics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 451. Mr. Co- 
hen. 

Continuation of Mathematics 451. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 157 

456. Advanced Statistical Methods. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
356. Mr. Cohen. 

Methods studied in Mathematics 356 will be covered from an advanced viewpoint 
and in more detail. Advanced applications from the physical, biological, and social 
sciences. 

457. Calculus. Prerequisite: Mathematics 355. Mr. Barrow. 
Improper integrals, approximate integration, partial differentiation, multiple in- 
tegrals. 

458. Advanced Calculus. Mr. Barrow. 

Elliptic integrals, line integrals and Green's Theorem, Fourier series, implicit func- 
tions, functional determinants, calculus of variations. 

460. Statistical Methods of Quality Control. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics lOlx, Mathematics 356 or Economics 312 for undergraduate credit; 
Mathematics lOlx, Mathematics 102, Mathematics 356 or Economics 312, and 
Business Administration 351 for graduate credit. Graduate credit is given 
toward the M.B.A. degree only. Mr. Cohen. 

A review of fundamental statistical concepts including frequency distributions, 
averages, measures of dispersion, the construction and use of the Shewhart Control 
Charts, and techniques of acceptance sampling. 

461. Advanced Analytical Geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 355. Mr. 
Huff. 

A careful introduction to the analytic geometry of Euclidean space, beginning with 
elementary propositions on real vectors. 

462. Projective Geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 461. Mr. DuVal or 
Mr. Huff. 

The algebra of homogeneous co-ordinates; duality; cross-ratio: classification of 
projective transformation; configurations of lines and points: the conic. 

463. Geometry of Binary Forms. Prerequisite: Mathematics 355. Mr. 
DuVal or Mr. Huff. 

Invariants and convariants of sets of points on a line. 

800. Theory of Infinite Processes. 3 hours. Mr. Fort. (Not offered in 
1952-53.) 

Logical development of the ordinary number system, infinite sequences, infinite 
series, uniform convergence. 

801. Theory of Infinite Processes. 3 hours. Mr. Fort. (Not offered in 
1952-53.) 

Continuation of Mathematics 800. 

Power series, Dirichlet series, Fourier series. 

802. Theory of Infinite Processes. 4 hours. Mr. Fort. (Not offered in 
1952-53.) 

Continuation of Mathematics 801. 

Summability of series, theory of integrals, continued fractions. 

811. Finite Differences. 3 hours. Mr. Fort. (Not offered in 1952-53.) 
Difference operators, summation of series, summation formulas, Bernoulli poly- 
nomials and numbers, interpolation. 

812. Difference Equations. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 811. 
Mr. Fort. (Not offered in 1952-53.) 

813. Difference Equations. 4 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 812 
and 814. Mr. Fort. (Not offered in 1952-53.) 

814. Analytic Functions of a Complex Variable. 3 hours. Mr. Bar- 
row. 

815. Analytic Functions of a Complex Variable. 3 hours. Mr. Barrow. 
Continuation of Mathematics 814. 

816. Analytic Functions of a Complex Variable. 4 hours. Mr. Barrow. 
Continuation of Mathematics 815. 

817. Ordinary Differential Equations. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 401. Mr. Fort. (Not offered in 1952-53.) 

Existence and boundary value theorems; behavior of solutions in the neighborhood 
of singular points. 

818. Partial Differential Equations. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 817. Mr. Fort. (Not offered in 1952-53.) 

Existence and boundary value theorems; series representation of solutions. 



158 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

826. Functions of a Real Variable. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
816. Mr. Barrow. 

832. Theory of Numbers. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 431. Mr. 
Levit. 

Quadratic forms, diophantine equations, introduction to additive number theory. 

833. Theory of Numbers. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 832. Mr. 
Levit. 

Quadratic fields, introduction to the general theory of algebraic numbers. 

843. Modern Algebra. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 442. Mr. Huff 
or Mr. Levit. 

Domains, rings, fields, linear algebras. 

844. Modern Algebra. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 843. Mr. Huff 
or Mr. Levit. 

Continuation of Mathematics 843. 

845. Theory of Groups. 4 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 442. Mr. 
Huff or Mr. Levit. 

Cyclic groups, groups with operators, Galois theory. 

853. Mathematical Statistics. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 458. 
Mr. Cohen. 

Theory of estimation and testing hypotheses. 

863. Algebraic Geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 462. Mr. DuVal 
or Mr. Huff. 

Groups of transformations; invariants; geometries, algebraic curves. 

864. Algebraic Curves. Prerequisite: Mathematics 863. Mr. DuVal or 
Mr. Huff. 

Theory of curves over the field of complex numbers, singularity of curves, genus. 

865. Elementary Rational Surfaces. Prerequisite: Mathematics 863. 
Mr. DuVal or Mr. Huff. 

Rational ruled surfaces; Veronese surfaces; del Pezzio surfaces. 

866. Synthetic Geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 462. Mr. Huff or 
Mr. DuVal. 

Axiomatic development of projective geometry. Introduction of coordinate field and 
relation of special properties of the geometry to those of the field. 

891. Mathematics Seminar. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate major 
in mathematics or equivalent and two quarters of graduate work in mathe- 
matics. The Staff. 

A study by the seminar method of some phase of current research in mathematics. 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

(Robert E. Park Hall, North Campus) 

Head: Jordan. Staff: Alciatore, Chance, Downs, Hall, Peterson, Shedd, 
Terry, Williams, Womack. 

(No University credit will be granted for work in a foreign language when 
such work is a repetition of courses completed in high school.) 

FRENCH 

101-102. Elementary French. 10 hours. The Staff. 

A course designed to teach the student to pronounce French, to conduct simple con- 
versations, and to read texts within a limited vocabulary range. Oral practice, em- 
phasis upon sentence patterns, and the fundamental principles of structure. (No credit 
is granted for French 101 without French 102.) 

103. Intermediate French. Prerequisite: French 102 or two entrance 
units in French. The Staff. 

Intensive and extensive reading. Texts of moderate difficulty selected from well 
known authors. A rapid review of French grammar, irregular verbs, and idioms. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 159 



104. Intermediate French. Prerequisite: French 103 or its equivalent. 
The Staff. 

Intensive and extensive reading of texts of marked literary merit. Pronunciation 
and conversation. Prepares students to read French in their specialized fields, to enter 
courses in French literature (201), or to enter courses in conversation and composition 
(106). 

106. Intermediate French Conversation and Composition. Prerequisite: 
French 104. The Staff. 

The emphasis is divided between conversation (three days a week) and composition 
(two days a week). The two phases of the course are correlated to promote the stu- 
dent's ability to express himself accurately whether in speaking or in writing French. 
A strongly suggested elective for anyone planning to major in French. 

Any course numbered below 200 is considered elementary and will not 
count toward the minimum of 20 hours required in one subject for a major 
in language. 

201. An Introduction to the Study of French Literature. Prerequisite: 
French 104. Mr. Alciatore, Mr. Downs, or Mr. Jordan. 

A study of the main literary movements and major works of representative French 
writers from the twelfth through the seventeenth centuries. 

202. An Introduction to the Study of French Literature, (continued). 
Prerequisite: French 104. Mr. Alciatore, Mr. Downs, or Mr. Jordan. 

A study of the main literary movements and major works of representative French 
writers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 

357. French Phonetics. Prerequisites: French 201-202 or French 106. 

The organs of speech, the differences in production of French and English speech 
sounds, and the various speech phenomena, such as intonation, assimilation, linking, 
and the length of vowel sounds. Practice in phonetic transcription and pronunciation. 

French 201 and 202 are prerequisite to the following French courses 
except as indicated. 

406. Introduction to Old French. 

407. Medieval French Culture. 

408. French Literature of the Renaissance. Mr. Doivns. 

Origins and development of the Renaissance in France, political and social influ- 
ences, analysis of major works, reports, collateral readings, term paper. 

430. The Romantic Movement in France. Mr. Doicns. (Offered in alter- 
nate years. Not offered in 1952-53.) 

The origins of the movement in France with the principal emphasis upon Rousseau, 
Chateaubriand, and Madame de Stael. Foreign influences. The formation of the 
cenacles. Chief literary manifestoes. Analysis of representative works; Lamartine, 
Hugo, Vigny, Musset. and minor poets — poetry, novels, and drama. Collateral reading, 
reports, and a term paper. This course is designed as the first of a series of three; 
it should be followed by 431 and 432. 

431. The French Novel since Romanticism. Mr. Alciatore. (Offered in 
alternate years. Not offered in 1952-53.) 

The novel as it evolved from Romanticism to Realism and from Realism to Natural- 
ism. Analysis of subjective elements and of character development. The cult of form. 
The increasing influence of science. The reaction against Naturalism. Primary atten- 
tion to Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert, and Zola. Lectures and collateral reading. This 
course is designed to follow 430 and to correlate with 432. 

432. French Drama and Poetry since Romanticism. Mr. Alciatore. (Of- 
fered in alternate years. Not offered in 1952-53.) 

Baudelaire. The Parnassians: Leconte de Lisle and Heredia. The Symbolists: Ver- 
laine. Mallarme, etc. The Mid-Nineteenth Century Social Drama of Dumas fils and 
Augier. Henri Beeque. Antoine and the origins of the Little Theater Movement. The 
Post-Naturalistic Drama of Maeterlinck, Porto Riche. Rostand, and others. Attention 
will be given at the end of this course to the development of French literature in all 
genres at the conclusion of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twen- 
tieth century. Lectures, analysis of texts, collateral reading. This course is designed 
to follow 430 and to correlate with 431. 

456. Advanced French Syntax and Composition. No prerequisite beyond 
French 104. Mr. Chance. 

Comprehensive review; suggested for teachers of French. 



160 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

459. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century — First half. Mr. 
Jordan. (Offered in alternate years.) 

The growth of the Classic Ideal with emphasis on the political, religious, social, and 
artistic background of the period. The evolution of poetic and prose styles with em- 
phasis upon Malherbe, Descartes, Pascal, and Bossuet. The development of the classic 
tragedy with Pierre Corneille. This course will not be arbitrarily limited to the litera- 
ture before 1660 but will deal as fully as possible with such authors as Boileau and 
LaFontaine in order that 460 may concentrate on two writers only. Lectures, analysis 
of texts, collateral reading. 

460. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century — Second half. Mr. 
Jordan. (Offered in alternate years.) 

This course will concentrate almost exclusively on Racine and Moliere. A study of 
dramatic techniques and an analysis of characters. Many plays will be read and dis- 
cussed in class; others will be assigned for collateral reading. Lectures and criticism 
of texts. This course is designed to follow 459. 

461. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Mr. Doicns or Mr. 
Alciatore. (Offered in alternate years.) 

The growth of French rationalism. The growth of sensibility. Belles-Lettres. Bayle, 
Fontenelle, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot, d'Holbach, Condillac, Helvetius ; 
Marivaux, Lesage, Beaumarchais, Andre Chenier, and others. Lectures, collateral read- 
ing, analysis of texts. 

481. (Education) Problems of Teaching Romance Languages. Prerequi- 
site: French or Spanish 201-202 or 15 hours of Education in addition to 
French or Spanish 104. Mr. Shedd. 

History of method, psychology of language learning, values, objectives, teacher's 
library, technique of oral work, pedagogy of phonetics, phonetics applied to gram- 
mar, pedagogy of vocabulary and reading. Visual aids and realia, individual dif- 
ferences, tests and measurements. Evaluation of texts, course content. 

GERMAN 

101-102. Elementary German. 10 hours. Mr. Terry and Staff. 
Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, conversation, composition, reading, and 
translation. (No credit allowed for German 101 without 102.) 

103. Intermediate German. Prerequisite: German 102 or two entrance 
units in German. Mr. Terry and the Staff. 

Grammar review, reading and translation of intermediate texts, composition, and 
conversation. 

104. Intermediate German. Prerequisite: German 103. Mr. Terry and 
the Staff. 

Extensive readings in modern German prose. Composition and conversation. 

105. Intermediate German for Science Students. Prerequisite: German 
102 or two entrance units in German. Air. Terry and the Staff. 

A course at the intermediate level designed for pre-medical students and majors 
in chemistry, physics, and zoology. 

Any course numbered below 200 is considered elementary and will not 
count toward the minimum of 20 hours required in one subject for a 
major in language. 

201. Introduction to German Literature. Prerequisite: German 104 or 
German 206 and 207. Mr. Terry. 

A study of representative works of German literature from its beginning through 
the eighteenth century. 

202. Introduction to German Literature (continued). Prerequisite: Ger- 
man 104 or German 206 and 207. Mr. Terry. 

A study of the main literary movements and major works of representative German 
writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

205. Scientific German. Prerequisite: German 103 or 105. Mr. Terry. 
Readings in chemical, medical, and biological German. 

210. Advanced Conversation and Composition. Prerequisite: German 104. 
Three recitations and two double periods for oral practice each week. 

German 201 and 202 are prerequisite to the following German courses 
except as indicated. 

430. The German Drama of the Nineteenth Century. 3 hours. 
A study of the development of German drama in the nineteenth century ; reading 
of selected plays from the period, including Kleist, Grillparzer, and Hebbel. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 161 

431. The German Novel of the Nineteenth Century. 3 hours. 

A study of the principal works of Storm, Keller, Fontane, Meyer, and other German 
novelists of the nineteenth century. 

432. Introduction to Goethe. 3 hours. 

Study of Goethe's life, with lectures, reports, and readings from his poems, novels, 
and plays other than Faust. 

433. Goethe's Faust. 3 hours. 
Reading and interpretation of Part 1 of Faust. 

434. German Literature to 1500. 3 hours. 

A study of the principal works of German literature up to the Reformation. 

435. Lessing and German Classicism. 3 hours. 

A study of the plays and essays of Lessing. with especial attention to his influence 
on the development of German drama. 

436. German Romanticism. 3 hours. 

A study of the Romantic Period of German literature. 

437. Introduction to Schiller. 3 hours. 

The reading and study of the principal plays of the great German dramatist. 

438. Contemporary German Literature. 3 hours. 

A study of the literary movements of the twentieth century in Germany. 

439. The German Lyric. 3 hours. 

Extensive reading of German lyrics and ballads from the time of the Minnesingers 
to the present. 

ITALIAN 

101-102. Elementary Italian. 10 hours. Mr. Alciatore or Mr. Downs. 
Grammar and composition, conversation, reading and dictation. (No credit is 
granted for Italian 101 without Italian 102.) 

103. Intermediate Italian. Prerequisite: Italian 102. Mr. Alciatore or 
Mr. Downs. 

Intermediate grammar, reading, conversation, dictation, and composition. 

104. Italian Grammar. Composition, and Conversation. Prerequisite: 
Italian 103. Mr. Alciatore or Mr. Doicns. 

Advanced grammar, reading, oral and written composition, conversation, dictation. 

RUSSIAN 

(Students are advised not to take Russian without two units or the equiva- 
lent in another language.) 

101-102. Elementary Russian. 10 hours. 

Grammar and composition, conversation, reading and dictation. (No credit i6 
granted for Russian 101 without Russian 102.) 

103. Intermediate Russian. Prerequisite: Russian 102. 
Intermediate grammar, reading, conversation, dictation, and composition. 

104. Russian Grammar. Composition, and Conversation. Prerequisite: 
Russian 103. 

Advanced grammar, reading, oral and written composition, conversation, dictation. 

SPANISH 

101-102. Elementary Spanish. 10 hours. Mr. ^Yillia1ns and the Staff. 
Pronunciation, fundamentals of grammar, reading and conversation. (No credit is 
granted for Spanish 101 without Spanish 102.) 

103. Intermediate Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 101 or 102 or two 
entrance units in Spanish. Mr. Shedd and the Staff. 

Intensive and extensive reading. Texts of moderate difficulty selected from well 
known authors. A rapid review of Spanish grammar, irregular verbs, and idioms. 

104. Intermediate Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 103. Mr. Shedd and 
the Staff. 

Intensive and extensive reading of texts of marked literary merit. Pronunciation and 
conversation. Prepares students to read Spanish in their specialized fields, to enter 
courses in Spanish literature (201) or to enter courses in conversation and composi- 
tion (106). 



162 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

106. Spanish Conversation and Composition. Prerequisite: Spanish 104. 
The Staff. 

The emphasis is divided between conversation (three days a week) and composition 
(two days a week). The two phases of the course are correlated to promote the stu- 
dent's ability to express himself accurately whether in speaking or in writing Spanish. 
A strongly suggested elective for anyone planning to major in Spanish. 

Any course numbered below 200 is considered elementary and will not 
count toward the minimum of 20 hours required in one subject for a major 
in language. 

201. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Prerequisite: Spanish 104. 
Mr. Shedd or Mr. Williams. 

A study of representative works of Spanish literature from its beginning through 
the Golden Age. 

202. Introduction to Spanish Literature (continued). Prerequisite: 
Spanish 104. Mr. Shedd or Mr. Williams. 

A study of representative works of Spanish literature from the Golden Age to the 
present. 

306. Spanish Commercial Correspondence and Advanced Conversation. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 104. Mr. Shedd. 

A study of special forms and construction of business letters with conversation 
based on Spanish-American material. 

Spanish 201 and 202 are prerequisite to the following Spanish courses 
except as indicated. 

420. The Modern Spanish Novel. Mr. Williams. (Offered in alternate 
years. Not offered in 1952-53.) 

A study of trends of the Spanish novel of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

421. The Drama of the Golden Age. Mr. Shedd. (Offered in alternate 
years.) 

A study of the principal dramatists and their works with particular emphasis on 
Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarcon, and Calderon de la Barca. 

422. Spanish Prose of the Golden Age. Mr. Williams. (Offered in alter- 
nate years.) 

A study of the novel and short story of this period with emphasis on Cervantes. 

423. The Drama of the Nineteenth Century. Mr. Williams. (Offered 
in alternate years.) 

A study of the principal trends in the development of the drama with readings from 
representative authors. Particular emphasis on the Romantic Drama and the Comedy 
of Manners. 

424. Spanish Prose Before the Golden Age. Mr. Williams. 

A study of the exemplar collections, La Celestina, the chivalresque, sentimental, 
and Moorish novel. 

425. The Modern Drama. Mr. Williams. 

A study of representative writers and their works from Perez Galdos to the present 
day. 

426. Advanced Spanish Syntax and Composition. Mr. Shedd. 

A study of grammatical forms and usages with particular reference to the needs 
of those preparing to teach. 

427. Spanish Poetry to 1700. Mr. Shedd. 

A study of the development of poetry, its sources and forms, with particular 
attention to the epic and ballad. 

428. Spanish Phonetics. Mr. Williams. 

A study of the organs of speech, the differences in production of Spanish and 
English speech sounds, and the various speech phenomena. Practice in phonetic 
transcription, pronunciation, and intonation. 

429. Spanish Poetry since 1700. Mr. Shedd. 

A study of poetry with particular reference to its development in the nineteenth 
century. 

430. Spanish-American Poetry. Mr. Shedd. (Offered in alternate years. 
Not offered in 1952-53.) 

A study of the contribution of the Spanish-American nations to the development 
of poetry. Readings from representative poets of the several countries. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 168 

431. Spanish-American Prose. Mr. Shedd. (Offered in alternate years. 
Not offered in 1952-53.) 

A study of the essay and novel as developed in the Spanish-American nations. 
Readings from representative writers of the several countries. 

433. Introduction to Old Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 428. Mr. Shedd. 
Phonology, morphology, and selected readings to illustrate the development of 
the Spanish language. 

481. (Education) Problems of Teaching Romance Languages. Prerequi- 
site: French or Spanish 201-202 or 15 hours of Education in addition to 
French or Spanish 104. Mr. Shedd. 

History of method, psychology of language learning, values, objectives, teacher's 
library, technique of oral work, pedagogy of phonetics, phonetics applied to gram- 
mar, pedagogy of vocabulary and reading. Visual aids and realia, individual dif- 
ferences, tests and measurements. Evaluation of texts, course content. 

MUSIC 

(Fine Arts Building, North Campus) 

Head: Hodgson. Staff: Anderson, Beach, Blanchard, Dunaway, Harrison, 
Karlas, Kimble, Kopp, Kratina, Mitchell, Schnebly, Smith, Warner. 

THEORETICAL COURSES 
(For Music Students) 

9. Elements and Fundamentals of Music. No credit. (Meets five times 
a week.) Especially designed for students with insufficient high school 
preparation. Theory Staff. 

10. Fundamentals of Music. 3 hours. (Meets five times a week.) 

A student expecting to take this course must take an examination. If he does 
not qualify, he must take the preparatory course, Music 9. 

11. Theory: Introduction to Harmony, Sight-Singing, and Dictation. 3 
hours. (Meets five times a week.) Prerequisite: Music 10 or examination. 

Includes part-writing of all triads, sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony. 

12. Theory: Elementary Harmony, Sight-Singing, and Dictation. 3 
hours. (Meets five times a week.) Prerequisite: Music 11. Theory Staff. 

Part-writing of triads in inversions, sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony. 

34. Theory: Intermediate Harmony, Sight-Singing, and Dictation. 3 
hours. Prerequisite: Music 12. Theory Staff. 

Secondary seventh chords and inversions, sight-singing, dictation, and keyboard 
harmony. 

35. Theory: Intermediate Harmony, Sight-Singing, and Dictation. 3 
hours. Prerequisite: Music 34. Theory Staff. 

Altered chords. 

36. Theory: Advanced Harmony. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 35. 
Theory Staff. 

Chromatic harmony and modulation. 

333. Advanced Theory and Keyboard Harmony. Prerequisite: Music 36. 
Theory Staff. 

370. Form and Analysis. Prerequisite: Music 34, 35, 36. Mr. Anderson 
or Miss Kimble. 

Harmonic and polyphonic forms analyzed. Special stress given sonata form and 
Bach's "Well Tempered Clavichord." Students encouraged to write originally in 
forms thus analyzed. 

371. Counterpoint. Prerequisite: Music 34, 35, 36, and 370. Mr. Kopp. 
Species — 16th Century Counterpoint. 

372. Advanced Form and Analysis. Prerequisite: Music 370. Mr. Ander- 
son or Miss Kimble. 

373. Advanced Sight-Singing and Dictation. Prerequisite: Music 36. Mr. 
Anderson. 



164 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

374 a-b. Orchestration. 6 hours (3 hours per quarter). Prerequisite: 
Music 370. Mr. Mitchell. 

Principles and practices of instrumentation for chamber music, orchestra, march- 
ing, and concert bands. 

475. Advanced Counterpoint. Prerequisite: Music 371. Mr. Kopp. 
18th Century Contrapuntal techniques. 

476 a-b-c. Composition. 6 hours (2 hours per quarter). Prerequisite: 
Music 370 and 371. Mr. Kopp. 
Writing in smaller forms. 

MUSIC LITERATURE COURSES 
(Open to All Students) 

3. Appreciation of Music. 3 hours. (One hour each quarter.) One lec- 
ture recital a week. Open to the public. Mr. Hodgson. 

Credit given only to students taking another theoretical music course. Special per- 
mission from director required before registering for credit. 

21. Introduction to Music. 3 hours. Mr. Blanchard. 
A survey literary course for B.S. majors in Music Education. 

22 a-b-c. History of Music. 6 hours (2 hours per quarter). Miss Kimble. 
A literary course for music students. 

343. Listener's History of Music. 3 hours. Mr. Hodgson and the Staff. 

For the student untrained musically, who wishes to acquire an intelligent apprecia- 
tion of art. Required of all students preparing to teach in the public schools of 
the state. 

350. Development of Opera. Mr. Hodgson. 

A general literary course in the appreciation of the entire field of opera. Illustra- 
tions from selected scores played in class. Not open to students who have had 340. 

353. History of Piano and Voice Literature. 3 hours. Miss Karlas and 
Mr. Warner. 

358. History and Analysis of Musical Style. Mr. Hodgson. 
Designed especially for art majors. 

442. Wagner's Music Dramas. 3 hours. Prerequisite for graduate credit: 
Music 22 or equivalent and two music courses numbered 200-399. Mr. Hodg- 
son. 

A course of literary and cultural value, concentrating on a detailed study of the 
plots and themes of all the Wagner operas, with scores played in class. 

455. Music Literature Survey and Advanced Music History. Prerequi- 
site: Music 22 a-b-c, and 10 hours of music literature. 

456. Bach-Beethoven-Brahms. 3 hours. Prerequisite for graduate credit: 
Music 22 or equivalent, and two music courses numbered 200-399. Miss 
Karlas. 

A detailed study of the three composers, with their masterpieces performed in class. 

457. Beethoven Symphonies. 3 hours. Prerequisite for graduate credit: 
Music 22 or equivalent, and two music courses numbered 200-399. Mr. Hodg- 
son and Miss Kimble. 

A detailed study of the nine symphonies of Beethoven. 

460. Modern Music 3 hours. (For Summer Quarter.) Prerequisite for 
graduate credit: Same as for Music 457. Mr. Hodgson or Miss Kimble. 

/ literary course illustrating modern trends in music of Schonberg, Stravinsky, 
Bariok, and Scriabin. 

462. Modern Music. Prerequisite for graduate credit: same as Music 457. 
Mr. Hodgson or Miss Kimble. 

A literary course illustrating modern trends in music of Shonberg, Stravinsky, 
Hindemith. B-nrtok, Scriabin and others. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 165 



METHODS COURSE 
(For Music Education Students) 

251. String Methods. 2 hours. Basic principles as applied to all strings. 

252. Woodwind Methods. 2 hours. Basic principles as applied to all 
woodwinds. 

253. Brass Methods. 2 hours. Basic principles as applied to all brasses. 

263 a-b-c. Teaching Instruments, Fundamentals of Various Instruments. 
3 hours (1 hour per quarter). Class meets three times per week. Mr. Ander- 
son, Mr. Harrison, Mr. Mitchell, and Mr. Kratina. 

Laboratory for minor instruments, voice, conducting, orchestration. One quarter 
band, one chorus, one orchestra. 

302. Methods of Teaching Public School Music. For Education majors 
only. Miss Smith. 
A course of music fundamentals designed for grade teachers. 

312. Public School Music for Elementary Grades. For Music majors. 
Prerequisite: Music 302 or Music 10. Miss Smith. 

313. Music in the Junior and Senior High Schools. Prerequisite: Music 
302 or Music 10. Mr. Anderson, Mr. Mitchell, and Miss Smith. 

314-315. Supervised Teaching of Public School Music. 5 hours each. 
Prerequisites: Music 312-313. Miss Smith or Mr. Beach. 

362 a-b-c. Elementary Conducting. 6 hours (2 hours per quarter). Pre- 
requisite: Music 36. 

Principles of conducting and interpretation with vocal and instrumental ensembles. 

364. Music Education Survey. Mr. Mitchell. 

365. Survey Choral Music and Technique Choral Conducting. Mr. War- 
ner or Mr. Mitchell. 

414. Workshop for Problems for Teachers in Music Education. 5 hours. 
Mr. Anderson and Mr. Mitchell. 

Course designed to meet the needs of elementary school teachers, instructional 
supervisors, and music teachers. 

431. Problems in Vocal Music Education. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 
312 and 313. Mr. Beach, Mr. Mitchell. 

Detailed study of voice problems from classroom point of view beginning in ele- 
mentary and continuing through secondary school; technique used in choral ensem- 
bles; evaluation of present concepts and practices. 

432. Problems in Instrumental Music Education. 3 hours. Prerequi- 
site: Music 312 and 313. Mr. Beach. 

Study of techniques used for development of the instrumental music program be- 
ginning in elementary and continuing through secondary school; diagnosis of prob- 
lems relating to strings, woodwinds, brasses, percussion. 

433. Music Administration and Curriculum. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Un- 
dergraduate requirements in education, Music 312 and 313. Mr. Beach. 

Development of music curriculum as part of general education planning; evalua- 
tion of school curricula and how music can become a functional part; problems in 
music administration, personnel, finance, equipment. 

434. Choral Music Materials. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 312 and 313. 
Mr. Warner, Mr. Kopp. , 

Study and evaluation of music literature available for use in public schools at all 
levels of instruction; research in various mediums and schools of composition which 
can be adapted for school use. 

435. Instrumental Music Materials. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Music 312 
and 313. Mr. Beach. 

Evaluation of materials available at all levels of instruction for band, orchestra 
and chamber music; research in materials of various mediums and schools of com- 
position which can be adapted for school use. 



166 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

APPLIED MUSIC COURSES 

(Primarily for Music Majors) 

The following courses are offered to enable the talented students who 
wish to devote a large amount of time to practical work to earn a limited 
amount of credit. Transfer credits will be accepted tentatively but must be 
validated by examination or completion of advanced work in residence. The 
maximum amount of credit allowed on any degree for this work is 24 quarter 
hours (only six quarter hours per year). 

Before registering for Applied Music courses students must consult with 
the Head of the Music Department. 

Laboratory fees vary from $20 to $50 for the following courses: 

71 a-b-c. Applied Music. 6 hours (2 hours per quarter). Two half-hour 
private lessons a week for three quarters. Laboratory fee course. 

72 a-b-c. Applied Music. 6 hours (2 hours per quarter). Prerequisite: 
Music 71 a-b-c. Two half -hour private lessons a week for three quarters. 
Laboratory fee course. 

85 a-b-c. Applied Music. 3 hours (1 hour per quarter). One half-hour 
private lesson a week for three quarters. Laboratory fee course. 

86 a-b-c. Applied Music 3 hours (1 hour per quarter). Prerequisite: Mu- 
sic 85 a-b-c. One half-hour private lesson a week for three quarters. Labora- 
tory fee course. 

87 a-b-c. Applied Music 3 hours (1 hour per quarter). One half-hour 
lesson a week for three quarters. Laboratory fee course. 

88 a-b-c. Applied Music 3 hours. (1 hour per quarter). Prerequisite: 
Music 87 a-b-c. One half-hour lesson a week for three quarters. Laboratory 
fee course. 

273 a-b-c. Applied Music 6 hours (2 hours per quarter). Prerequisite: 
Music 72 a-b-c. Two half-hour private lessons a week for three quarters. 
Laboratory fee course. 

274 a-b-c. Applied Music 6 hours (2 hours per quarter). Prerequisite: 
Music 273 a-b-c. Two half-hour private lessons a week for three quarters. 
Laboratory fee course. 

287 a-b-c. Applied Music 3 hours (1 hour per quarter). Prerequisite: 
Music 86 a-b-c. One half-hour private lesson a week for three quarters. Lab- 
oratory fee course. 

288 a-b-c. Applied Music 3 hours (1 hour per quarter). Prerequisite: 
Music 287 a-b-c. One half-hour private lesson a week for three quarters. 
Laboratory fee course. 

289 a-b-c. Applied Music 3 hours (1 hour per quarter). Prerequisite: 
Music 88 a-b-c. One half-hour private lesson a week for three quarters. Lab- 
oratory fee course. 

290 a-b-c. Applied Music 3 hours (1 hour per quarter). Prerequisite: 
Music 289 a-b-c. One-half-hour private lesson a week for three quarters. Lab- 
oratory fee course. 

485 a-b-c. Applied Music 3 hours (1 hour per quarter). To be used 
for any weaknesses in applied music for graduate candidates. 

Extracurricular practical courses in piano technique, piano keyboard har- 
mony, and ensemble playing are given to students without fee. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 167 

ENSEMBLE COURSES 

(For Music Majors) 

387. Little Symphony Orchestra. 6 hours (1 hour per quarter). Two 
hours per week for two years. Open to students who can qualify for sym- 
phony orchestra. 

388 a-b-c. A Cappella Choir. 6 hours (1 hour per quarter). Two hours per 
week for two years. Open to students who can qualify for serious choral 
study. 

389. Voice Class 2 hours. 

Study of basic principles of voice production and how to apply them in glee clubs 
and choruses. 

390. University Band. 6 hours (1 hour per quarter). Three hours per 
week for two years. Open to students who can qualify and who will give 
this time in addition to the time credited to military science. 

COURSES COMBINED WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
359. English Folk Song. Mr. Hodgson and Mr. Walker. 

451. Music and Literature. Mr. Brown. 

A comparative study of the forms, relationships, and aesthetics of music and 
literature. Admission by consent of the instructor. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

836. Editing and Arranging. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Music 33, 374. Mr. 
Mitchell. 

Evaluation of representative instrumental and vocal published scores. A study of 
how to adapt them to specific groups; transcription for large or small ensembles; 
studies in timbre, color, qualities, etc. of instruments and voices; arranging accom- 
paniments. 

837. Score Analysis. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Music 33, 376. Mr. Ander- 
son, Mr. Kopp, Mr. Mitchell. 

Learning techniques of harmonic and form analysis and preparation of scores for 
rehearsal. 

838. Advanced Conducting. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Music 363, 370. Mr. 
Kopp, Mr. Warner. 

Developing conducting technique in rehearsing laboratory ; survey and evaluation 
of materials on conducting. 

875. Research Seminar. 5 or 10 hours. Prerequisite: Music 359. Geor- 
gia folk Music, collecting native songs and musical material. Other subjects 
may be used if of real creative value or if new arrangements of old materials 
are made available for original research. 

877. Applied Music 5 or 10 hours. Open to piano or voice graduates by 
permission of Head of the Department. Preparation of recital program, 
intensive study of repertoire, and preparing recommended works for public 
performance. 

878. Seminar in Sacred Music Literature. 5 or 10 hours. Prerequisites: 
10 hours of senior division music literature courses. Mr. Hodgson, Mr. Mit- 
chell. 

Historical development of the large forms of sacred music; the oratorio, the cantata, 
the passions. Study of actual literature. 

879. Advanced Composition. 5 or 10 hours. Prerequisite: Music 476. Use 
of various forms. Public performance of major original composition in large 
form. 

880. The Symphony after Beethoven. 5 or 10 hours. Prerequisites: 10 
hours of senior division music literature courses. Mr. Hodgson, Mr. Mitchell. 

Historical development of the symphony. Study of actual scores. Analysis of mas- 
terpieces for the orchestra. Study of orchestral development. 



168 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

NURSING EDUCATION 

Head: Grant. 
Basic Courses 

30. Professional Adjustments. 1 hour. 

An orientation course that considers the principles that guide and govern personal 
and professional conduct; the recognition of differences in religious beliefs; individual 
and group standards of the profession. Includes visits through the hospital. 

31. Introduction to Nursing Arts. 4 hours. This course includes Units 
1 through 6, as outlined in the National Curriculum Guide for Schools of 
Nursing. 

Health education in relationship to the physical requirements for the proper care 
of patients and the procedures found most helpful for the promotion of health. A 
basic understanding of the principles of nursing is taught with emphasis upon the 
attitude toward patients, their relatives, and their friends. 

100. History of Nursing. 3 hours. 

A survey of the developments in early and more recent nursing history with special 
thought given to nursing literature, history of nursing education, international as- 
pects of nursing, public health nursing and professional organizations. 

Major Courses in Nursing Education for Instructors of Nursing Arts, 

Assistant Clinical Instructors or Head Nurses, and Clinical 

Instructors or Supervisors. 

1. Medicinal Calculations. 

The study of weights and measurements, calculations involving percentage solu- 
tions, dilutions and concentrations, specific gravities, metric and apothecaries' sys- 
tems. A review of the action of drugs on the human body as related to the nursing 
field. 

200. Preventive Medicine and Public Health. (Also in basic program). 

A study of organized programs which are designed to control and combat condi- 
tions that affect the health of the individual family and community; the organization 
and administration of private and public agencies ; communicable disease control. 
legislation and regulation : morbidity and mortality statistics, and an interpretation 
of the socio-economic factors relative to health programs. 

321. History of Nursing Education. 3 hours. 

This course is desirable for all nursing education majors. It deals with the develop- 
ment of nursing with special consideration given to trends in nursing and nursing 
education. The outstanding professional, social, and economic factors relating to the 
trends will be stressed and also the individual and group responsibility for promot- 
ing professional development. 

323. Public Health Nursing. 3 hours. 

An over-view of the scope, objectives, principles, and practice of public health nurs- 
ing in rural and urban agencies, under public and private auspices. Experience in 
the out-patient service and clinics will be arranged wherever possible. 

324. Curriculum of the School of Nursing. 3 hours. 

The application of principles of curriculum construction to the school of nursing 
curriculum, content of courses, class and ward schedules as related to the rotation 
of the student nurse in her clinical instruction, records including the evaluation of 
the student's work. 

325. Ward Management and Clinical Teaching. 

This is an intensive course in the principles of management, personnel management, 
hospital organization, place of the hospital in the community and its relation to 
other health and social agencies, objectives of ward management, principles and 
methods of clinical teaching, discussion of rotation between and within clinical ser- 
vices, routines, equipment and supplies essential to clinical nursing practice. 

326. Guidance in Nursing Education. 3 hours. 

This course is designed to aid the graduate nurse, head nurse, supervisor, teacher 
of nursing arts, and administrator to develop a personal working philosophy of the 
role of guidance in education and to acquire understanding of and skill in technique 
in guidance that may be effectively used in scl Is of nursing. 

327. Principles and Methods of Teaching as Applied to Nursing. 

The principles and methods of teaching in a school of nursing and in public health. 
This course will consider the organization of teaching plans, integration of social and 
health aspects in the care of the patient, measurement of student achievement, tech- 
niques in the practice of nursing in the care of the patient in the hospital and in 
the home. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 1_69 

328. Teaching of Nursing Arts. 3 hours. 

A study of the principles and methods used in teaching nursing. The students will 
be expected to plan a course for either classroom or ward teaching and to demon- 
strate nursing procedures. Attention will be given to the modification of nursing pro- 
cedures to meet the emergency needs or situation without jeopardizing the safety of 
the patient. 

346, 347, 348. Directed Observation and Practice in Teaching the Nurs- 
ing Arts. 15 hours. 

Includes the seminar in health, mental, and social aspects of nursing. The pre- 
requisites for the field work are the curriculum of the schools of nursing, principles 
and methods of teaching applied to nursing, and the teaching of nursing arts. 

346, 347, 348. Directed Observation and Practice in Ward Management 
and Clinical Teaching. 15 hours. 

Includes the seminar in health, mental, and social aspects of nursing. The pre- 
requisites for the field work are the curriculum of the schools of nursing, principles 
and methods of teaching applied to nursing; and ward management and clinical 
teaching. 

349. Principles of Public Health Nursing. 

A course designed to give an understanding of the continuity of nursing care. A 
brief survey of Public Health Nursing, including the principles involved as well as 
the trends in Public Health Nursing, with emphasis placed on the responsibility 
of the nurse as a member of the community health team. 

350. Methods of Teaching Public Health Nursing. 

The factors involved in applying principles and learning methods in Public Health 
Nursing as they apply to activities within the community, home, school, health 
center and other groups, emphasizing the acceptance of responsibility by the indi- 
vidual or group for individual and /or public health. 

THE NINE QUARTERS OF CLINICAL NURSING INSTRUCTION GIVEN 
AT APPROVED HOSPITALS INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING COURSES : 

32. Elementary Nursing Arts. Units 7 through 10. 

Principles and practice of nursing procedures used in the care of the patient. The 
students will be guided in the care of the patient as a whole, as well as in group nurs- 
ing care. Emphasis will be placed on habits of observation, economic practices sur- 
rounding care of patient, and the skills essential to fine nursing care of patient. This 
may include experience in the surgical supply room and the out-patient department 
of the hospital. 

33. Arithmetic, Drugs, and Solutions. 1 hour. One half-hour class, one- 
hour laboratory weekly. 

This course is designed to teach simple mathematic calculations and the use of the 
metric and apothecaries' systems in the preparation of solutions and dosages of medi- 
cine. Weights, symbols, terms used in administration of medicine. 

34. Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 3 hours. 

35. Medical Science. 1 hour. 

36a. Medical Nursing. 3 hours. Two lectures, one 3-hour laboratory, and 
clinics. 

37a. Surgical Nursing. 2 hours. One hour lecture, one 3-hour labora- 
tory, and clinics. 

36b and 37b. Nursing in Medical and Surgical Specialties. 3 hours. 
Three lectures, two 3-hour laboratory periods, and clinics. 

40. Clinics and Out-Patient Department. 2 hours. 

42. Social Case Work for Nursing. 1 hour. Two-hour lecture, discus- 
sion, clinics, and observation in social service. 

200. Preventive Medicine and Public Health. 3 hours. (Also in gradu- 
ate nurse program.) 



170 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

PHILOSOPHY 

(Meigs Hall, North Campus) 

Head: Pfuetze. Staff: Gotesky. 

104. Introduction to Philosophy. The Staff. 

A course in the fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of philoso- 
phy, the vocabulary and problems of philosophy, and the relation of philosophy 
to science, art, and religion. Includes a survey of the basic issues and major types 
in philosophy, and shows their sources in experience, history, and representative 
thinkers. 

305. Ethics. Mr. Pfuetze. 

A study of moral philosophy in its bearing on human conduct and social relations, 
including an analysis of the nature and criteria of good and evil, right and justice, 
moral obligation and freedom. Crucial issues of personal and social ethics are dis- 
cussed in the light of readings in the classical moralists and in contemporary litera- 
ture. 

356. History of Philosophy, Ancient and Medieval. Mr. Gotesky. (Offer- 
ed in alternate years.) 

An historical introduction to philosophy, tracing the development of European 
philosophy from the time of the early Greeks through the Renaissance. 

357. History of Philosophy, Modern. Prerequisite: Philosophy 104 or 356. 
Mr. Gotesky. (Offered in alternate years.) 

Traces the development of European philosophy up to the nineteenth century. 

358. Modern Logic. Mr. Gotesky. 

A study of the methods, principles, and problems of accurate thinking, including 
induction, deduction, the syllogism, fallacies, scientific method, and the contribu- 
tions of symbolic logic. 

399. Philosophy and Society. (For Seniors only. Required of all candi- 
dates for A.B. and B.S. degrees.) Mr. Pfuetze. 

An integrative survey course stressing value theory, designed to help students 
develop a philosophy adequate for modern living. Attention is focused upon a critical 
examination of great contemporary issues from the point of view of the methods, 
concepts, world views, and values by which modern men can live. Emphasis on 
the place that moral, aesthetic, and religious influences occupy in society. 

406. (Religion) Hebrew-Christian Ethics. Mr. Ayers and Mr. Pfuetze. 

An historical and interpretative survey of the social and ethical teachings of the 
Hebrew prophets, Jesus, and the Christian church; the relevance of this ethical 
pattern for the social problems, conflicts, and institutions of contemporary life. A 
sequel to Philosophy 305, but may be taken independently. (Given in cooperation with 
the Department of Religion.) 

408. Philosophy of Religion. Mr. Pfuetze. 

The branch of philosophy that inquires into the origin, nature, function, and value 
of religion ; examines the source and validity of the claims which religion makes ; 
studies the fundamental religious problems and concepts as they find expression 
in Western religious philosophies, such as Judaism, Catholicism, Protestantism, 
Modernism, Agnosticism, Ethical Idealism, and Humanism. 

409. Literature of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. The Staff. (Offer- 
ed in alternate years. Not offered in 1952-53.) 

A course in the primary works of great philosophers of ancient and medieval 
times, especially the writings of Plato and Aristotle. 

410. Literature of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy. Prerequisite: 
Philosophy 104 or 356. The Staff. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered 
in 1952-53.) 

Selected readings in important philosophers, modern and contemporary. 

411. Aesthetics. Mr. Gotesky. 

The philosophy of the beautiful and of aesthetic values in art. literature, music, 
or wherever found. Intended to deepen the student's understanding of the purpose 
and function of art in the life of mankind. An analysis of aesthetic experience and 
of aesthetic types. Covers the nature, origin, psychological and social foundations 
of art, both practical and fine. Particular emphasis is placed upon the role of social 
ideas and cultural circumstances in the growth and decline of the various arts. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 171 

450. Contemporary Philosophy. Prerequisite: At least one course in 
philosophy other than 358. Mr. Gotesky. 

The third course in the History of Philosophy sequence, but may be taken in- 
dependently. Selected readings in important philosophers of the 19th and 20th 
centuries, including such thinkers as Nietzsche. Mill, Marx, Spencer, Bergson, James, 
Royce, Dewey, Whitehead, and Santayana. The program is left flexible to allow 
for the divergent interests and needs of students and to permit consideration of 
significant current material. 

458. Advanced Logic Prerequisite: Philosophy 358. Mr. Gotesky. 
An advanced course dealing with both traditional and modern methods in logic, 
especially the contributions of symbolic and mathematical logic. 

For descriptions of the following courses in Political Philosophy, refer 
to the offerings in Political Science. 

485. (Political Science) Political Philosophies of Ancient, Medieval, 
and Early Modern Times. Mr. Allums. 

486. (Political Science) Political Philosophies of Recent Times. Mr. 
Allums. 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

(Physics Building, North Campus) 

Head: Dixon. Staff: Barr, Burkhalter, Cooper, Henry, Martin, Sears. 

ASTRONOMY 

391. Descriptive Astronomy. Prerequisites: Physical Science 1, Physics 
20, or equivalent. Four lecture and one two-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Mr. Dixon. 

This course is designed for the general student who desires to acquaint himself, 
or herself, with the stars, the members of the solar system, their motions and con- 
stitution. The laboratory and observing work of this course includes exercises with 
the celestial globe, a series of star maps, observations with a three-inch telescope 
(equatorial), and measurements of latitude and longitude with a sextant. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

1. Physical Science. No credit will be allowed for Physical Science 1 if 
a student shows credit for Physics 20. The Staff. 

A survey, the objectives of which are: (1) to give an elementary knowledge of the 
most fundamental facts, laws, theories, and hypotheses of physics and astronomy and 
the main practical applications of these sciences in our daily lives : (2) to give some 
idea of the meaning and value of the scientific method and how physical science has 
modified man's ways of thinking and manner of living. 

PHYSICS 

20. Physics Survey. Not open to students who have credit for Physical 
Science 1. The Staff. 

An elementary study of the fundamentals of physics with a study of some of the 
simpler applications of physics. The laboratory period of two hours a week will be 
devoted to measurements designed to give an introduction in laboratory methods. 

26. General Physics — Heat, Sound, and Light. 6 hours. Four recita- 
tions and four hours of laboratory. Prerequisite: Physical Science 1. The 
Staff. 

A course in that part of physics dealing with the fundamental laws of heat, light, 
and sound. Physical Science 1 students should take this course instead of Physics 28. 

27. General Physics — Mechanics. Four hours of recitation and two 
hours of laboratory work. Prerequisite: Physical Science 1, Physics 20, or 
equivalent. The Staff. 

A course in that part of physics that deals with the fundamental laws of mechanics. 

28. General Physics — Heat. Sol t nd, and Light. Four hours of recitation 
and two hours of laboratory work. Prerequisite: Physics 20 or equivalent. 
The Staff. 

A course in that part of physics dealing with the fundamental laws of h^at. sound, 
and light. Physical Science 1 students should take Physics 26 rather than this course. 



172 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

329. General Physics — Electricity and Modern Physics. Four hours of 
recitation and two hours of laboratory work. Prerequisite: Physics 27 or 
Physics 28. The Staff. 

A course in that part of physics dealing with the fundamental laws of electricity 
and the newest developments in the general field of physics. 

332. Experimental Electricity. Three hours of recitation and four hours 
of laboratory work. Prerequisite: Physics 329. Mr. Dixon. 

A course of intermediate grade in electrical measurements. 

333. Sound and Light. Three hours of recitation and four hours of 
laboratory work. Prerequisite: Physics 26 or Physics 28. Mr. Cooper. 

An intermediate course stressing experimental work on reflection, refraction, inter- 
ference, diffraction, and polarization of light. 

334. Advanced Heat. Four hours of recitation and two hours of labora- 
tory work. Prerequisite: Physics 26 or Physics 28. Mr. Henry. 

The material in this course includes temperature and its measurement, specific 
heats, thermal expansion, transfer of heat by conduction, convection and radiation, 
the states of matter, elementary thermodynamics, production of high and low temp- 
eratures. 

370. Principles of Photography. Three hours of recitation and four hours 
of laboratory work. Prerequisite: Physical Science 1, Physics 20, or the 
equivalent. Will not count toward the minimum of 20 hours required in one 
subject for a major in physics. Supply deposit, $10.00. Mr. Dixon. 

An elementary approach to the factors involved in the choice of a camera, the 
exposure and the development of the film, the production of contact prints, the 
enlargement of prints, and color photography. 

380. Electronics. Two hours of recitation and six hours of laboratory 
work. Prerequisites: Physical Science 1, Physics 20, or equivalent, and ele- 
mentary algebra. Will not count toward the minimum of 20 hours required 
In one subject for a major in physics. Breakage deposit, $5. Mr. Burkhalter. 
A study of the sources, methods of control, and the applications of electrons. This 
is a practical course rather than a theoretical one ; it is designed primarily for stu- 
dents who expect to make practical applications of their knowledge of electronics. 

404. Theoretical Mechanics. Five recitations per week. Prerequisites: 
Physics 27 and Mathematics 355. Mr. Dixon. 

The material presented includes advanced fundamental concepts, rectilinear motion 
of a particle, curvilinear motion in a plane, particle dynamics from the point of view 
of energy, statics of a particle, statics of a rigid body, and the dynamics of a rigid 
body. An attempt is made to emphasize the fundamental importance of mechanical 
principles in their application to all the fields of physics. 

405. Advanced Analytical Mechanics. Five recitations per week. Pre- 
requisites: An introductory course in Theoretical Mechanics (such as Physics 
404) and Mathematics 355. Desirable parallel course: Differential equa- 
tions. Mr. Dixon. 

A study of advanced mechanical principles, desirable as a background for Quantum 
Theory and Wave Mechanics, D'Alembert's principle, LaGrange's equations, Hamil- 
ton's principle, Canonical equations, and Generalized Coordinates. 

434. Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory. Five recitations per week. 
Prerequisites: Physics 334 and Mathematics 355. Mr. Dixon. 

A study of the laws of thermodynamics and their application in the fundamental 
concepts of physics with an introduction to statistical theories as applied to the 
behavior of gases. 

471. Advanced Electricity. Five recitations per week. Prerequisites: 
Physics 332 and Mathematics 355. Mr. Burkhalter. 

The laws of electrostatics and magnetostatics are developed with the aid of Gauss's 
theorem, Stokes' Theorem, etc. The course develops through the laws of Biot-Savart 
and Ampere to Maxwell's equations. From Maxwell's equations are derived the 
properties of electromagnetic radiation and propagation through a wave guide. 

472. Nuclear Structure. Five recitation hours. Prerequisites: Physics 
332, 333, and Mathematics 355. Mr. Burkhalter and Mr. Dixon. 

This course is designed to introduce the students to the structure of atomic nuclei 
as they have been inferred from the study of experimental data on natural radio- 
activity, nuclear interactions, electromagnetic radiations and ionization. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 17_3 

481. Spectroscopy. Five recitations per week. Prerequisites: Physics 333 
and Mathematics 355. Desirable parallel course: Physics 472. Mr. Cooper. 

This course will present a survey of the results of experimental spectroscopic 
analysis and their theoretical interpretation. The spectrum and corresponding energy 
level diagram of the hydrogen atom will be considered both according to Bohr's 
Theory and in the light of the new Wave Mechanics. With the introduction of the 
vector model the alkali spectra will be studied. The Zeeman and Stark effects will be 
treated and Pauli's exclusion principle will be applied to the building up principle 
of the periodic system. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

(Academic Building, North Campus) 

Head: Pound. Staff: Allums, Askew, Collins, Hughes, Range, Saye. 

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 

1. American Government. Mr. Pound and the Staff. 

An introductory course covering the essential facts of federal, state, and local gov- 
ernments in the United States. Prerequisite for advanced courses in political science. 
A satisfactory grade will exempt a student from the requirement of passing an exami- 
nation on the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of Georgia before 
graduation. 

202. American Government. Prerequisite: Political Science 1. All stu- 
dents who expect to major in political science are advised to take this course. 
Mr. Pound and the Staff. 

A continuation of Political Science 1 with emphasis on the internal organization 
and actual workings of the various departments of our national government. 

410. American Political Parties. Mr. Pound. 

A study of the influence of political parties on the governmental organization and 
on the history and political thought of the United States. 

483. American Constitutional Law. Mr. Saye. 

A study of the fundamental principles of constitutional interpretation and practice 
in the United States through decisions and opinions of the Supreme Court. 

484. American Constitutional Law. Mr. Saye. 

A continuation of Political Science 483, with emphasis on recent Supreme Court 
decisions. 

492. (Economics) American Administrative Law. Mr. Saye. 

This course stresses the legal principles and practical doctrines involved in work 
of administrative tribunals (the Interstate Commerce Commission. Federal Trade Com- 
mission, Securities and Exchange Commission, etc.) vested with gwasi-legislative or 
guasi-judicial powers, or both. 

STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS 

405, The Constitution of Georgia. Mr. Saye. 

An historical survey of the evolution of the Constitution of Georgia followed by 
a detailed study of the present Constitution through decisions and opinions of the 
Supreme Court of Georgia. 

406. State Government. Mr. Pound. 

A study of the forms of organization, the functions, and the operation of state 
government of the United States with particular emphasis on the government of the 
State of Georgia. Exempts the student from the requirement of passing an exami- 
nation on the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of Georgia 
before graduation. 

468. County and Municipal Government. Mr. Collins. 

A study of the forms of organization, the functions, and the operation of county 
and municipal government in the United States and particularly in Georgia. 

885. Reading and Research in Problems of Government in Georgia. For 
graduate majors in political science only. Mr. Pound and Mr. Saye. 

This course is designed to provide individual instruction for graduate students 
majoring in political science who are interested in an intensive study of special 
problems of Georgia government. 

POLITICAL THEORY 

408. American Political Thought to 1800. Mr. Pound. 

A study of the political theory of the colonial period, the American Revolution, and 
the theories of the Convention of 1787 and the early interpretation of the Constitution. 
Political Science 408 and 409 form a natural sequence, though either or both may 
be elected. Where the student takes the entire sequence, it is desirable to take 
Political Science 408 first. 



174 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

409. American Political Thought since 1800. Mr. Pound. 
A study of the theories as to the nature of the Union, slavery, Civil War, Recon- 
struction, and the contemporary United States. 

485. Political Philosophies of Ancient, Medieval, and Early Modern 
Times. 

An historical study of the development of ideas relative to the state and govern- 
ment in ancient, medieval, and early modern times. Attention is directed primarily 
to the political thought of a selected group of eminent philosophers including Plato, 
Aristotle, Cicero, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Bodin, Hobbes, and 
Locke. 

486. Political Philosophies of Recent Times. 

This course forms a sequence to Political Science 485. Either of the courses may 
be taken separately, but since emphasis is given to the growth of political thought, 
it is preferable to take the early period first. 

COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

307. European Governments. Mr. Askew. 

A study of the principles and forms of organization of the governmental systems 
of Europe. 

311. The Governments of Latin America. Mr. Range. 

A study of the principles and forms of organization of the governments of Latin 
America. 

412. The Governments of the Soviet Union and the Far East. Mr. 
Range. 

A study of the governments of the Soviet Union, China, Japan, Korea, India, and 
Pakistan. Emphasis will be placed on the fundamental principles upon which these 
governments are founded and the machinery by which these principles are effected. 

420. International Relations. Mr. Range. 

An introductory study of the forces and practices dominating contemporary inter- 
national political relations. 

421. International Organization. Mr. Range. 

A study of the principles, organizations, and functions of international govern- 
mental organization such as the United Nations, Organization of American States, 
Council of Europe, the Specialized Agencies, the international judiciary, etc. 

481. Political Institutions. Mr. Askew. 

A study of the nature and functioning of political institutions such as constitutions, 
legislative bodies, executive offices, and their strength and weaknesses in the 
maintenance of constitutional government. 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

441. Principles of Public Administration Mr. Hughes. 

A study of administrative organization, relationships, and controls in the United 
States. 

442. Public Personnel Administration. Mr. Collins. 

A study of civil service systems, their organization, procedures, and relationships. 

443. Public Financial Administration. Mr. Hughes. 

A study of the budgeting process, preparation and enactment of the budget, 
financial accountability and the audit. 

444. (Economics) Government and Business. Mr. Smith. 

A general survey of the economic aspects of business regulation by the government, 
with special reference to regulatory developments and methods in the United States; 
•ther activities affecting business in general, as extension of loans and subsidies, 
maintenance of fact-finding agencies and government-owned corporations. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

(Meigs Hall, North Campus, unless otherwise specified) 
Acting Head: Young. Staff: Edwards, Gray, James, Osborne, Swain, Zeigler. 

All courses in the Psychology Department are in the Biological Science 
Division except Psychology 1. 371, 414, 473, 474, 482, 483, and 484, which 
are in the Social Science Division. Psychology 1 is a prerequisite to all other 
courses in Psychology except Psychology 358. It is recommended that no 
freshman be registered for psychology during his first quarter. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES ^5 

1. Elementary Psychology. Mr. Edwards, Mr. Gray, Mr. James, Mr. Os- 
borne, Miss Young, Miss Zeigler. 

A beginning course in psychology, given without laboratory experiments. It in- 
cludes the fundamental facts and laws of psychology and indicates something of 
the various problems and fields of psychology, its relation to other fields, and 
some of the more important applications of psychology. 

99. Reading and Study Skills. Three class meetings and two hours indi- 
vidual practice weekly. Miss Swain. 

A non-credit course designed for improving reading skills to a level adequate for 
college study. Includes study and practice of: comprehension of varied materials; 
adapting speed of reading to purpose and materials; vocabulary skills; and efficient 
use of study time. 

322. Experimental Psychology. Three periods for discussion, demonstra- 
tion, and lecture and two double laboratory periods. Miss Young. 

Psychology experiments will be performed to give the student an opportunity 
to discover and evaluate his abilities. These experiments will be utilized to give the 
student first hand experience with the facts and laws of psychology and to offer 
training in scientific thinking. 

358. The Psychology of Adjustment. Mr. Edwards. 

A course in mental hygiene: application to personal adjustment*, solutions of 
conflicts, fears, personality difficulties: development of character and personality. 
The psychology of morale in peace and war: psychotherapy. 

370. Differential Psychology. Miss Zeigler. 

Scope of differential psychology, heredity and environment; training and growth: 
the distribution of individual differences ; the relationship between behavioral and 
structural characteristics: theories of constitutional types; the nature and inter- 
relationships of psychological traits. 

-' 371. Applied Psychology. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Miss Zeigler. 

The applications of the principles of psychology to social, professional, industrial, 
and educational fields. 

372. Psychological Problems. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Miss Zeigler. 

This course provides for a systematic treatment, largely from a theoretical point 
of view, of some problem or problems of psychology, such as types of psychology, 
character and personality, habit, human variability. 

374. Genetic Psychology. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Miss Zeigler. 
The evolution of structure and behavior. The problems of childhood, maturity, and 
senescence as integral parts of the life cycle are given careful study. 

400. Systematic Psychology. Prerequisites: for minor, one course in 
psychology and evidence of ability to do the work of the course; for part of 
major, four courses in psychology. Mr. Edwards or Mr. James. 

An advanced study in systematic and experimental psychology intended as a 
detailed study in theoretical discussions and investigations of special topics. Critical 
study of one systematic treatise and experimental work on special topics. 

401. Systematic Psychology. Continuation of Psychology 400. May be 
taken by permission only. 

405. Theories of Learning. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and two senior 
division courses in psychology. Mr. James. 

An analysis of the major theories of learning current among psychologists doing 
research in the field. Course begins with a study of the connectionism of Thorndike, 
and follows with the theories of Guthrie. Hull. Skinner, Kohler. Lewin. Wheeler, 
and Tolman. An attempt is made to determine the aspects common to all theories 
and to understand their differences. Emphasis is placed on experimental procedures 
used by each psychologist. 

410. Special Problems. One hour discussion and eight hours laboratory. 
Prerequisites: for minor, one course in psychology, and evidence of ability 
to do the work of the course; for part of major, four courses in psychology. 
Mr. Edwards. 

Critical study of special problems in psychology, both experimental and theoretical, 
such as types of psychology, association and memory, attention and feeling, be- 
havior, and psychological examining and diagnosis. A special topic or experiment 
will be assigned each student for careful investigation. 

411. Special Problems. Continuation of Psychology 410. May be taken 
by permission only. 



176 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

412. Clinical Problems. Three hours discussion, lour hours laboratory 
and clinical work. Prerequisites: for minor, one course in psychology and 
evidence of ability to do the work of the course; for part of major, four 
courses in psychology. Mr. Edwards and Miss Young. 

Clinical studies of cases, including the use of experimental methods, clinical diag- 
nosis and special tests with critical study of a problem or problems specially se- 
lected for each student. 

413. Clinical Problems. Continuation of Psychology 412. May be taken 
by permission only. 

414. Psychology of Personnel. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or permission 
of instructor. Mr. Gray. 

This course attempts to present an organized account of the more important con- 
tributions that psychology has made to the problems of personnel counseling. It 
describes the methods that have brought satisfactory results in selection and direc- 
tion of personnel. Representative procedures for evaluating the abilities and aptitudes 
of employees are studied. Interviewing as a special technique is emphasized. 

415. Psychometrics. Mr. Osborne. 

A course designed to give the student an introduction to the essentials of psycho- 
logical testing with experience in administering, scoring, and interpreting tests in- 
cluding those of scholastic achievement, mental ability, scholastic aptitude, interest 
and personality. 

416. Individual Psychological Testing. Prerequisites: Three courses in 
psychology, preferably including Psychology 415. Mr. Osborne. 

A course designed to give the student training in the administration, scoring, and 
interpretation of individual psychological tests including the Wechsler-Bellevue. 
Terman-Merrill, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, performance scales, and 
other individual tests for adults. All students are required to achieve a minimum 
competence in the use of tests for both children and adults but the major part of 
the practical work may be in the age range selected by the student. 

417. Advanced Testing. Prerequisites: Three courses in psychology in- 
cluding preferably Psychology 415 and 416. Mr. Osborne. 

An introduction to the theory, administration, scoring, and application of the 
Rorschach Method and the Thematic Apperception Test. The class is limited and 
is open only to advanced students with adequate background in psychological meas- 
urement and theory of personality. Registration only by permission of the depart- 
ment head or the instructor. 

423. Abnormal Psychology. Lecture, laboratory, and clinical work. Pre- 
requisites: for minor, one course in psychology and evidence of ability to do 
the work of the course; for major, four courses in psychology. Mr. Edwards 
or Miss Young. 

The study of abnormal manifestations and problems of mental disease, together 
with some of the methods of psychological and psychiatric examinations. The course 
deals with problems of normality, variability, individual differences, and human 
adjustments. It is planned especially for students who are going into social, edu- 
cational, clinical, and remedial work, emphasis being placed upon mental hygiene in 
all phases of the course. 

459. Mental Hygiene. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and Education 304, 
when taken as part of graduate minor by students majoring in Education; 
4 courses in psychology, as approved by instructor, if taken as part of grad- 
uate major by students majoring in psychology. Mr. Edwards or Miss Young. 

An advanced course dealing with mental hygiene problems, especially of children 
and adolescents; problems of growth and adjustment; adjustments in the home and 
the school; recreational problems; retardation and delinquency; special childhood 
problems as brought in by students: diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. 

461. Advanced Experimental Psychology. One hour discussion and eight 
hours laboratory and clinical work. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and 322. 
Mr. Edwards or Mr. James. 

Emphasis is placed upon experimental technique and methods of experimental 
work. Specially adapted for the student who desires to learn scientific method and 
for the student who is going on in psychology. 

462. Clinical Psychology. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and 423. May be 
taken by permission only. Miss Young. 

Deals with problems of the normal, abnormal, maladjustments, delinquency, mental 
disease, methods of clinical examination, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. The 
course will be related especially to the work of the University of Georgia Clinic. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 177 

463. Clinical Psychology. Two or three hours advanced discussions and 
four or five hours of clinical examining and case work. Prerequisites: Psy- 
chology 1, 423, and preferably 462. May be taken by permission only. Miss 
Young. 

A continuation of Psychology 462. 

473. Social Psychology. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and two senior 
division courses in psychology. Mr. Ediuards. 

The social aspects of psychology: social stimulation, group response, tradition, 
custom, motive, suggestion and attitude as they relate to group action and social 
improvement. Methods of research in social psychology with special attention to the 
application of experimental methods to social phenomena. 

474. Occupational Information. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. Mr. Gray. 
A wide variety of occupations will be overviewed and certain others will be studied 

in detail. Tools of the occupational consultant — Dictionary of Occupational Titles, 
occupational families, job descriptions, will be studied. Field trips to observe jobs 
will be part of the course. 

480. Physiological Psychology. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and two 
courses in biology. Mr. James. 

In this course the personality is viewed as an integration of three factors: the 
morphological, the physiological, and the psychological aspects of the organisms, 
with attention mainly on the integration between the psysiological and psychological 
aspect. The significance of the internal environment of the organisms for behavior 
is emphasized by analysis of experiments in which the internal environment is modi- 
fied by such factors as glandular deficiency, food changes and use of drugs, and then 
observing changes in behavior. Attention is also given to the structure and function 
of the receptors and action systems of the organism and the significance of these 
in adjustment. 

481. Comparative Psychology. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and two 
courses in biology. Mr. James. 

The central aim of comparative psychology is to study the increase in adjustment 
ability which has resulted from the increase in complexity of structure of animal 
types from age to age. The course begins with an analysis of the structure and be- 
havior of the amoeba and continues on through the animal series to man. The inte- 
gration of structure, physiological processes and behavior are emphasized throughout 
the course, resulting in a more thorough understanding of the adjustment processes. 

482. Employment Methods. Three hours discussion and four hours lab- 
oratory. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and elementary statistics. Mr. Gray. 

A survey of scientific methods of selecting men for industrial and business em- 
ployment. Interviewing, testing, and appraising human aptitudes are studied and 
practiced in laboratory situations. 

483. Work and Efficiency. Three hours discussion and four hours lab- 
oratory. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and elementary statistics. Mr. Gray. 

Various factors which affect work and efficiency — such as lighting, ventilation, 
methods, rest, age, motivation — are studied. Experiments are performed to demon- 
strate and evaluate these factors. 

484. Psychological Aspects of Wage Determination. Three hours dis- 
cussion and four hours laboratory. Prerequisites: Psychology 1 and ele- 
mentary statistics. Mr. Gray. 

Methods of job analysis, job evaluation, and merit ratings are studied and demon- 
strated. Actual practice in using these procedures is a part of the course. 

490. Development of the Young Child. Three lectures and four labora- 
tory periods in the Nursery School. Dawson Hall, South Campus. Prere- 
quisites: Psychology 1 and two senior division courses in psychology. Miss 
Young. 

A study of the physical, mental, emotional, and social development of the pre-school 
child, the environmental factors influencing the development of the young child, 
with emphasis upon techniques of guidance. Planned to meet requirements for teachers 
of home economics in high schools; desirable also for teachers of elementary grades. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA CLINIC 

Florene M. Young, Director 

The clinical work carried on by the Department of Psychology for many 
years was expanded in 1930 and includes psychological, physical, psychiatric, 
and neurological examinations and a limited amount of therapeutic service. 
Cooperative arrangements have been made with the schools, the personnel 
office, the college physician, the deans of the University, and with visiting 
psychiatrists and neurologists. 



178 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The Clinic is interested in the examination of both normal and abnormal 
individuals and in special problem cases. Those desiring services may apply 
to the Director. 

Advanced students may be admitted to work in the Clinic. 

The Clinic provides about once a month a speaker who can give accurate 
and scientific information about mental disorders and disease, and about 
what is generally known as mental hygiene. 

RELIGION 

(LeConte Hall, North Campus) 

Acting Head: Ayers. 

100. Introduction to the Study of the Bible. Mr. Ayers. 

A study of the social, economic, political, and religious situations which called 
forth the several books of the Bible, and the way in which each book or letter sought 
to meet the special situation to which it was addressed. Attention will be given to the 
growth of various religious concepts during the course of Biblical history. 

400. History of Religion. Mr. Ayers. 

It is the aim of this course to survey the nature of early and primitive religions 
and to cover the main outlines of the chief living religions of the world. The method 
will be both historical and analytical. 

406. (Philosophy) Hebrew-Chbistian Ethics. Mr. Ayers and Mr. 
Pfuetze. 

An historical and interpretative survey of the social and ethical teachings of 
the Hebrew prophets. Jesus, and the Christian church; the relevance of this ethical 
pattern for the social problems, conflicts, and institutions of contemporary life. 
(Given in cooperation with the Department of Philosophy.) 

410. Old Testament Literature. Mr. Ayers. 

A study of the nature, content, and problems of Old Testament literature, with 
attention given to historical data, literary forms, and outstanding personalities. 

411. New Testament Literature. Mr. Ayers. 

A study of the nature, content, and problems of New Testament literature, with 
particular attention given to (1) the political, social, and religious background of 
Judaism, out of which Christianity sprang; (2) the life of Jesus; (3) the immediate 
foreground of an expanding church. 

430. The Prophetic Movement. Mr. Ayers. 

A study of the development of Hebrew religion from its early, more primitive 
stages to the high point attained in the social, ethical, and spiritual teachings of 
the great writing prophets of Israel. 

440. The Teachings of Jesus. Mr. Ayers. 

Although primarily a study of what Jesus taught, attention is given to the literary 
and environmental background of his teaching, the historical life of the teacher, and 
the contemporary validity of what he taught. 

For the convenience of the students, courses approved for transfer credit 
when taken at the Christian College of Georgia are listed below. A maximum 
of 15 hours may be transferred. Each course carries 5 hours of credit. Classes 
are held at the Christian College, 220 South Hull Street. 

441. Origin and Early History of Christianity. Mr. Wasson. 
Historical and social background of the rise of Christianity, with emphasis placed 

upon the Jewish, Greek, and Roman contributions; a study of apostolic and post- 
apostolic periods of the church, with emphasis upon the evolving organization and 
thought of the early church. 

450. Religion during the Medieval and Reformation Periods, 500 A. D.- 
1600 A. D. Mr. Wasson. 

A socio-historical presentation of the development of Christianity in the Medieval 
and Reformation periods and its relation to the growth of Western Civilization. Such 
topics as the following will be studied: The Medieval Church of the West; the re- 
lation of Western Christianity to the Greek and Russian Orthodox Churches; the 
relation of Religion to Education ; scholasticism ; religion of the common man ; the 
Renaissance and the Reformation; the Reformation origins of Protestantism. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 179 



451. The Development of Modern Christianity. Mr. Wasson. 

A socio-historical presentation of the development of Christianity in the modern 
period in Europe and America and its relation to the growth of Western Civilization. 
Such topics as the following will be studied: growth of Protestant and Catholic- 
Christianity in England and on the Continent; influence of modern science and 
philosophy on religion ; Unitarianism and Universalism ; the Enlightenment and Chris- 
tianity ; religion in America and its significance as a social and historical factor in 
the development of American life. 

RUSSIAN 
(See Modern Foreign Languages) 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

(Academic Building, North Campus) 

Given under the general direction of the Chairman of the Social Science 
Division. 

4. Contemporary Georgia. Mr. Meadows. 

A discussion and analysis of certain aspects of Georgia's population, its charac- 
teristics and trends ; its relative standing in various statistical measures of economic 
and social wellbeing : its natural resources and economic accomplishments from 
the standpoint of agriculture, industry, and commerce; and its governmental organi- 
zation and problems. 

SOCIOLOGY 

(Academic Building, North Campus) 
Head: Williams. Staff: Chambliss, Dean, McMahan, Meadows. 

5. Introductory Sociology. A student may not receive credit for both 
Sociology 5 and Sociology 200. Mr. Chambliss and the Staff. 

The study of organized social life in terms of interaction of heredity, physical 
environment, the group and culture. Emphasis on fundamental sociological con- 
cepts, methods, and data. 

200. Principles of Sociology. A student may not receive credit for both 
Sociology 5 and Sociology 200. Mr. Chambliss and the Staff. 

This course is intended to give to the student a general survey of the principles 
of sociology, an understanding of the important concepts in the field, and an ac- 
quaintance with the techniques of study in sociology. 

315. The Field of Social Work. Miss Dean. 

An introductory course to the various aspects of present-day social work. Con- 
siders family and children's services, behavior clinics and case work approach to 
social problems, the courts, probation and parole, medical social services, group 
work, community organization, public assistance, and social security. Class discussion 
and collateral reading. 

344. Latin-America: People and Institutions. Mr. McMahan. 

A study of the structure and functioning of social institutions (including the 
family, school, church, and political institutions) in Latin-American countries; and 
an analysis of the Latin-American population to include: number and distribution: 
the composition (residence, race and nativity, age, sex, marital status, educational 
status, religious status, occupational status) ; the vital processes (measures of fer- 
tility and mortality) ; migration, and growth. 

356. Quantitative Methods in Sociology. Mr. McMahan or Mr. Williams. 
An introduction to quantitative methods in their application to sociological data. 

360. Contemporary Social Problems. Mr. Meadows. 

A study of both general and special problems of our times. The problems are con- 
sidered in the social and cultural setting in which they occur. The emphasis is upon 
people and their behavior with the thought that new and clearer meanings may be 
given the concepts of Americanism and democracy. 

Note: All 400 and 500 courses have as prerequisites Sociology 5 or 200 or the 
consent of the instructor. 

408. Advanced Principles of Sociology. Mr. Chambliss. 

A critical examination of the conceptual framework of the science of sociology is 
made. 



180 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

409. Social Change. Mr. Chambliss. 

The nature and theories of social change; causes and types of social change; the 
cultural lag theory; the adjustments of society to inventions; methods of studying 
the social effects of invention. 

420. Methods of Sociological Research. Mr. McMahan. 

A critical analysis of historical research, field observation, mapping, interviewing, 
evaluation of human documents and case studies as used in sociology; the relation of 
these methods to statistical procedure. 

427. Personality and Social Adjustment. Mr. McMahan or Mr. Williams. 

Foundation and development of personality; mechanisms of integration and ad- 
justment; roles of culture, groups and language; concepts of self; types and theories 
of personality ; divergent personalities. 

431. Principles of Rural-Urban Sociology. Mr. McMahan or Mr. Wil- 
liams. 

This course stresses the fundamental differences between rural and urban societies 
and the interrelationship between these two large groups of people. How personali- 
ties growing up in the different environments are affected, and some of the problems 
that arise because of the differences and conflicts between rural and urban interests. 
An intensive study of these two types of culture. 

433. Population Analysis. Mr. McMahan. 

Theory and dynamics of population growth; population pressure; migration; com- 
position; differential fertility; theories of the quality and optimum population; eco- 
nomic and social aspects of our population. 

435. Community Organization. Mr. Meadows. 

A study of the community as a unit of social organization ; contemporary trends 
in community organization and planning. 

443. Social Mobility. Mr. Williams. 

A study of the vertical and horizontal movements of people. Includes treatment of 
occupational, inter-generational, and social group mobility; as well as migration, both 
from the standpoint of the individual and of groups of people. How social groups are 
formed and how individuals and groups react to status and position in society. Special 
emphasis is given to the mobility of occupational groups. 

461. The Family. Mr. Chambliss. 

Family study from many different angles, utilizing data from the fields of anthro- 
pology, individual and social psychology, history, sociology, economics and psy- 
chiatry. 

470. Introduction to Public Welfare Administration. The Staff. 

A course that traces the historical development of public welfare services and con- 
siders their administration. Reference is made to the underlying problems with which 
present day public welfare departments deal; specific attention is paid to adminis- 
tration at local, state, and federal levels. Public administration as applied to welfare 
services is considered in its relation to administration in other fields. Discussion and 
readings. 

481. Criminology. Mr. McMahan. 

An introduction to the study of criminal behavior and its treatment. Attention 
will be paid to the development of criminal behavior in contemporary society and 
to the efforts of the individual to adjust to the demands made upon him. Emphasis 
will be placed upon the treatment of the offender by means of probation, imprison- 
ment, and parole. 

522. Development of Sociological Theory. Mr. Chambliss. 
A survey of some of the most important systems in the development of sociological 
theory. 

526. American Sociology. Mr. Williams. 

This course presents a complete coverage of the origin and development of sociology 
In the United States, from Ward to the present. Special emphasis is placed on the 
approaches to the subject and recent trends in the field will be studied and analyzed. 

800. Sociology Research Seminar. The Staff. 

This seminar offers opportunity for students taking graduate work as majors in 
sociology to do special research and study in the field under direction of staff mem- 
bers in the department. Individual members will be assigned to different students, 
but in no case may a student receive credit for more than one quarter of work„ 
although the problems under study may cover a longer period. 

SPANISH 

(See Modern Foreign Languages) 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 181 



SPEECH AND DRAMA 

(Fine Arts Building, North Campus) 
Head: Ballew. Staff: Andrews, Camp, Foreman, Popovich, Strother. 

1. Introduction to Speech and Drama. Lecture-laboratory course. The 
Staff. 

A general introductory course in the arts of the theatre: acting, scene-building 
and painting, lighting, stage management, make-up. Course is designed for fresh- 
men and transfer students entering the Department of Drama. Each student will 
be expected to work as assigned on various productions of the University and 
Laboratory Theatres. Analysis of teacher's problems in oral communication, debate, 
interpretation, and speech correction in the public school. 

2. Acting. Lecture-laboratory course. Mr. Andrews and Mr. Popovich. 
A general elective. The fundamentals of acting technique, including pantomime 

and improvisations. Class lectures, exercises, and reports. Individual and group 
assignments of various acting techniques and procedures. Each student is required 
to participate in the productions of the Laboratory Theatre. 

3. Acting. Lecture-laboratory course. Prerequisite: Drama 2 or consent 
of the instructor. Mr. Andrews and Mr. Popovich. 

A general elective. Continuation of exercises in acting techniques and procedures. 
Particular emphasis on characterization, line interpretation, and tempo. Each student 
is required to participate in the productions of the Laboratory Theatre. 

220. History of the Theatre. Mr. Camp. 

The development of the physical theatre and the growth of drama studied from 
the beginning of dramatic literature in Greece through commedia dell' arte. Rep- 
resentative dramatists of each period and their important contributions to dramatic 
literature are included from Aeschylus to Shakespeare. 

221. History of the Theatre. Mr. Camp. 

The development of the physical theatre and the growth of drama studied from 
the Elizabethan period to the present. Representative dramatists of each period 
and their important contributions to dramatic literature are included from Shake- 
speare to Odets. 

300. Teaching of Speech and Drama. Course designed for teachers in sec- 
ondary schools and colleges. No prerequisite is required but it is suggested 
that students should have Drama 1 and Drama 334 prior to taking Drama 300. 
Mr. Andrews and Mr. Popovich. 

Course deals with methods of teaching drama and producing plays in both high 
schools and colleges. Surveys of physical facilities and general dramatic programs of 
various schools and colleges will be studied and discussed, as well as general pro- 
duction methods and procedures. Fundamental study of various fields of speech, 
including interpretation, debate, public speaking, speech correction. 

317. Theatre Appreciation. 3 hours. Mr. Ballew. 

A comprehensive survey and general approach to drama and theatre, providing a 
basis for the appreciation of drama as a fine art. Lectures, reading of plays and 
class discussions of University Theatre productions are included. This course is 
provided for the student who is not particularly interested in majoring in drama 
but who desires an intelligent appreciation of drama and theatre. It is offered as a 
general elective. This course is especially designed to be taken with Music 343 and 
Art 317. 

334. Scene Building and Painting. Lecture-laboratory course. Mr. Camp. 
Planning the construction of stage settings ; scene building, painting, rigging, and 

handling; and other technical problems of the theatre. Course includes elementary 
drafting laboratory with practice in use of scale rule and reading floorplans and con- 
struction drawings. Practical laboratory assignments as members of University The- 
atre and Laboratory Theatre crews. 

335. Scene Design. Lecture-laboratory course. Mr. Camp. 

Survey of history and principles of scene design. Laboratory includes development 
of designs for a play through sketches, floor plans, colored elevations, and scale 
models. Practical assignments as members of University Theatre and Laboratory 
Theatre crews. 

336. Stage Lighting. Lecture-laboratory course. Mr. Camp. 

Study of the problems of lighting in the theatre; lighting instruments, lighting 
control; operation of lighting equipment. Practical assignments in the University 
Theatre and Laboratory Theatre. 

344. Radio Acting and Production. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Drama 2 or 3 
and /or consent of the instructor. Mr. Ballew. 

An advanced course in acting, including radio acting and script analysis. Plays 
will be broadcast regularly from the campus studios. 



182 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

345. Radio Acting and Production. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Drama 2 or 3 
and /or consent of the instructor. Mr. Ballew. 

An advanced course offered in sequence to Drama 334. Plays will be broadcast 
regularly from the campus studios. 

346. Radio Acting and Production. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Drama 2 or 3 
and /or consent of the instructor. Mr. Ballew. 

A continuation of the advanced acting sequence with plays being broadcast regu- 
larly from the campus studios. 

349. Play Analysis. Mr. Andrews and Mr. Popovich. 

Intensive examination of play plots. Study of the methods of breaking a plot 
down into its component problems, the solution to which is the production. 

350. Play Production. Lecture-laboratory course. Mr. Camp. 

Course coordinates all processes and phases of play production. The functions of 
the director, actor, designer, technician, and business staff are treated as integrated 
parts of the whole design. Practical laboratory assignments in the field of technical 
production and stage management in University Theatre and Laboratory Theatre. 

360. Play Direction. Mr. Ballew. 

A survey of the theory and practice of play directing in the modern theatre. It 
deals with the general philosophy of theatre practice, analysis of plays for pro- 
duction, play selection, and play casting. Each student makes a director's study of 
a specific play and is expected to spend some time observing and participating in 
the work of the University Theatre. 

361. Play Direction. Laboratory. Mr. Ballew. 

The production of plays in the Laboratory Theatre with students in the course 
serving as directors for the productions. Each student will direct two one-act plays 
during the quarter and submit a detailed director's manuscript of each production. 

362. Advanced Play Direction. Mr. Ballew. 

This course is designed for advanced students who wish to take an active part 

in the play production program of the University Theatre. Students will direct 

plays in the Laboratory Theatre, or serve as assistants to the director of the Uni- 
versity Theatre or as a stage manager of a production. 

400. Playwriting. Prerequisite: Drama 349 or consent of instructor. Mr. 
Andrews and Mr. Popovich. 

Elementary laboratory course in playwriting, including study and practice in writ- 
ing for the modern stage and radio. Plays that merit production are presented 'in 
Laboratory Theatre, which is conducted in connection with this course and the 
course in acting and play direction. 

Open to all juniors and seniors who submit an original play or short story that 
is approved by the instructor. 

SPEECH 

3. Oral Communication. 3 hours. Mrs. Foreman or Mr. Strother. 
Objective analysis of individual speech habits and an individually planned study 
of appropriate drills and activities for improving the skills of everyday speech. 

8. Voice and Articulation. Mrs. Foreman. 

Study of fundamental principles necessary to the development of an acceptable 
speaking voice and an effective informal conversational style. Phonetic analysis of 
the sounds of the English language as a basis for understanding and correcting com- 
mon defects of articulation and voice is included to meet the professional requirements 
of elementary teachers. 

50. Public Speaking. The Staff. 

Fundamental principles involved in group discussions and in the preparation and 
delivery of documented speeches for formal and informal occasions. 

309. English Phonetics. Prerequisite: Speech 8. Mrs. Foreman or Mr. 
Strother. 

Study of English intonation and rhythm as a basis for speech correction. Analysis 
of movements involved in production of the sounds of English both in isolation and 
in connected speech, including significant regional and foreign dialect variants. 

310. Speech Correction. Prerequisite: Speech 8. Mrs. Foreman or Mr. 
Strother. 

Recognition of minor functional defects of voice and articulation with emphasis 
on activities and special drills by which the classroom teacher may improve the 
everyday speech habits of children. Clinical observation required. 

311. Spehch Correction (Organic). Prerequisite: Speech 8. Mrs. Fore- 
man or Mr. Strother. 

Recognition of organic speech defects in children. An introduction to such princi- 
ples and procedures as may become the classroom teacher's responsibility in the re- 
habilitation of the speech -handicapped child. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 1_83 

350. Oral Argument. Prerequisite: Speech 50 or equivalent. Mr. Stroth- 
er. 

Practice and principles of argument, group discussion, and participation in both 
formal and informal debate. 

369. Radio Speech. Mrs. Foreman or Mr. Strother. 

General introductory course in radio script writing, adaptation, and production. 
A study of the principles of oral style in writing and speaking original programs 
aired over local stations. 

386. Oral Interpretation of Literate-re. Prerequisite: Speech 8 or con- 
sent of the instructor. Mr. Strother. 

A study of the techniques of literary analysis for effective oral reading of lyric 
and narrative literature and the development of vocal flexibility through a variety 
of problems in phrasing and emphasis. 

396. Dramatic Interpretation. Prerequisite: Speech 8. Mr. Strother. 

Development of oral skills through the study of the dramatic monologues of Brown- 
ing and original adaptations of scenes from Shakespeare and selected contemporary 
dramatists. 

SPEECH CLINIC 

General diagnostic services to the public. Individual appointments may be 
arranged at the speech laboratory. A limited number may be accepted for 
individual and group therapy. 

ZOOLOGY 

(See Biology) 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

FACULTY 
Johx Altox Hosch, B.S.C.. M.A., LL.B., Dean. 
Lucille Epps. Secretary. 



Harrison Agnevv Birchmore. A.B.. M.A.. LL.B.. Part-time Instructor in Law. 

Sigmuxd Albert Cohx. J.D., Professor of Laic. 

David Meade Felld. A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law. 

Thomas Fitzgerald Greex. Jr.. A.B., LL.B., J.S.D.. Professor of Law. 

Harold Milton Heckmax. B.S.C.. M.A.. C.P.A.. Part-time Professor of Law. 

William McLexdox Hexdersox. A.B., LL.B., LL.M., Associate Professor of 
Law. 

Johx Altox Hosch, B.S.C., M.A., LL.B., Professor of Law and Dean of the 
School of Laic. 

Albert Bruce Joxes, A.B.. LL.B., Part-time Assistant Professor of Law. 

James Jefferson Lexolr. B.A.. M.A., Ph.D., LL.B., LL.M., Professor of Law. 

Robert Ligox McWhorter. A.B., LL.B.. Professor of Law. 

Abit Nix. A.B., LL.B., LL.D., Part-time Instructor in Law. 

Jaxe Oliver. B.A., B.L.S., Librarian. 

Hexry Hayxes West. B.S., LL.B., Lecturer in Law. 



Omer Clyde Adebhold, B.S.A.. M.S., Ph.D., President of the University. 
Alvix Blocksom Biscoe. A.B., M.A.. Ph.D., Dean of Faculties. 



Joseph Thomas Askew. Ph.B., M.A.. LL.D.. Dean of Student Affairs. 

Walter Newman Daxxer. Jr., B.S.A.E., M.S.A., Registrar and Director of Ad- 
missions. 

Johx Dlxox Boltox, C.P.A.. Comptroller and Treasurer. 

LECTURERS FOR THE 1952-1953 SESSION 
(To be announced later) 



[ 184 ] 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 1^ 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Courses in law were first offered at the University in 1843 and the School 
of Law of The University of Georgia was established in 1859. The Honorable 
Joseph Henry Lumpkin, a distinguished lawyer, who later became the first 
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia, was elected the first professor 
of law. 

The School of Law is a member of the Association of American Law Schools, 
an organization of the leading law schools of the country. The American 
Bar Association has approved the quality of its work. The School has also 
been approved by the Board of Regents of the State of New York so that 
its graduates are eligible to take the bar examination in that state as in 
other states. 

STANDARDS OF THE AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION 

The Council on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar of the American 
Bar Association requests that attention be called to the following standards 
adopted by the Association: 

1. The American Bar Association is of the opinion that every candidate 
for admission to the bar should give evidence of graduation from a law 
school complying with the following standards: 

a) It shall require as a condition to admission at least three years of study 
in a college, or its equivalent. 

&) It shall require its students to pursue a course of three years' dura- 
tion if they devote substantially all of their working time to their studies, 
and a longer course, equivalent in the number of working hours, if they 
devote only a part of their working time to their studies. 

c) It shall provide an adequate library available for the use of the stu- 
dents. 

d) It shall have among its teachers a sufficient number giving their en- 
tire time to the school to ensure actual personal acquaintance and influence 
with the whole student body. 

e) It shall not be operated as a commercial enterprise and the compen- 
sation of any officer or member of its teaching staff shall not depend on the 
number of students or on the fees received. 

2. The American Bar Association is of the opinion that graduation from 
a law school should not confer the right of admission to the bar, and that 
every candidate should be subject to an examination by public authority 
to determine his fitness. 

3. The Council on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar is directed 
to publish from time to time the names of those law schools which comply 
with the above standards and of those which do not. and to make such pub- 
lications available so far as possible to intending law students. 

The School of Law of The University of Georgia is approved by the Council 
on Legal Education of the American Bar Association as fully complying 
with these standards. 

PURPOSES AND METHOD OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses of study offered in the School of Law are designed to give a 
thorough knowledge of the Anglo-American system of common law and to 
familiarize the student with statutory laws with which he must deal. Em- 
phasis is placed on teaching the student how to make a practical applica- 
tion of the legal principles he learns. Work is carried on in Practice Courts 
under conditions made as nearly as possible like those prevailing in the 
courts of the state. The School also undertakes to shape the interests and 



186 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

aims of its students so as to make them respected and useful citizens and 
to instill in them that high sense of personal honor and regard for profes- 
sional ethics that should characterize members of the legal profession. 

In general, the School operates under the case method of instruction as 
best designed to enable students to master the common law and equity as 
working systems. In addition, however, the study of cases is supplemented 
by statutory and textual materials. The student studies actual cases, deduc- 
ing from them the principles of law involved, and this approach tends to 
develop in the student the power of analysis of legal problems. This method 
of instruction accords with that followed by the leading law schools of the 
country. 

Instruction is given in the drafting of legal instruments by requiring the 
student to prepare, under the supervision of an instructor, contracts, leases, 
deeds, wills, charters, and other legal documents. 

Practical instruction in the preparation and trial of cases is given in a 
Practice Court. The work of this court is carried on under the direction of 
a member of the faculty, judges, and practitioners. Here are taken up mat- 
ters relating to the preparation of pleadings, examination and cross-examina- 
tion of witnesses, writing of briefs, presentation of arguments to the court 
and jury, taking of cases from lower courts to appellate courts, and other 
related subjects of a practical nature. For the work of this court there is 
a large and handsomely furnished court room. 

LAW CLUBS 

The student body of the School of Law is organized into clubs. Each 
club is presided over by a chief justice who is a member of the senior 
class. Cases are assigned to members of the first and second year classes 
for argument. The arguments are conducted before some member of the 
senior class or before some professor or practicing attorney invited by 
the club to sit as judge. After the decision legal principles involved in the 
case are discussed. These discussions frequently give to a student insight 
into a legal problem which he could not get so readily in any other way. 
With a regular schedule of cases in which opposing attorneys are members 
of different clubs, a spirit of friendly and wholesome rivalry has been de- 
veloped among the clubs. 

LECTURES 

In order that students may receive first-hand knowledge of what is actually 
taking place in the courts and of the development in the various fields of 
the law, a number of distinguished lawyers and judges deliver lectures on 
phases of the law in which they may be particularly interested. These men 
come to the School of Law because of interest in legal education and give 
their services without compensation. 

STUDENT MEMBERSHIP IN GEORGIA 
BAR ASSOCIATION 

In 1933 the Constitution and By-Laws of the Georgia Bar Association 
were amended so as to render eligible for junior membership any member 
of the second year or third year class of any law school within this state 
which is on the approved list of the American Bar Association. Students eligi- 
ble for membership are urged to avail themselves of this privilege and to at- 
tend the meetings of the Bar Association. Student members of the Asso- 
ciation are brought in contact with the leading spirits of the bench and bar 
and are introduced to problems considered by lawyers in their professional 
organizations. There is thus developed in the student a sense of professional 
consciousness. 






THE SCHOOL OF LAW 187 

BUILDINGS AND LIBRARY 

The School of Law of the University is housed in two buildings. The Main 
Law Building is a handsome structure provided by alumni and friends of the 
University and completed in 1932. It was named in honor of Harold Hirsch, 
Class of 1901, a devoted alumnus. On the ground floor are the court room 
and smoking and lounging rooms. The main floor of the building contains 
three large lecture rooms, administrative offices, and private offices for 
professors. The Alexander Campbell King Library is located on the top floor 
of the building. It was named for the late Judge Alexander Campbell King. 
Solicitor-General of the United States under President Wilson, and later a 
Judge of the United States Circuit Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. 
The School of Law is greatly indebted to the widow of Judge King, Mrs. 
Alice M. King, who contributed generously to the establishment of the library 
in memory of her husband. The Library has commodious reading rooms and 
a stack room with a capacity of 75,000 volumes. There are also private read- 
ing rooms for the students. 

With the increase in enrollment at the conclusion of the war it was neces- 
sary to provide additional physical facilities. The School of Law Annex, lo- 
cated to the North and adjacent to the Main Law Building, contains a large 
classroom, several reading rooms, offices for the faculty and other facilities. 

The Library of the School of Law, containing approximately 25,000 well 
selected volumes, is a member of the American Association of Law Libraries 
and is under the direction of a trained librarian. The book collection in- 
cludes the reports of all cases decided by the Supreme Court of the United 
States and other Federal Courts, the National Reporter System complete and 
the state reports antecedent thereto, the English Reports, Full Reprint, and 
many of the Canadian Reports. It also has the standard series of selected 
cases annotated, leading encyclopedias, the American Digest System, various 
compilations of the statute laws of all the states and of England, outstand- 
ing law reviews and periodicals, and a comprehensive up-to-date collection 
of texts and treatises on all phases of the law. The library also has the rules, 
regulations, and decisions of the administrative agencies of the federal gov- 
ernment. 

The library receives a substantial appropriation every year for the pur- 
pose of continuously expanding the book collection which is further aug- 
mented by the gifts of friends and alumni of the School of Law. 

The facilities of the General University Library are also available to the 
students of the School of Law. 



ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

An applicant for admission to the School of Law as a candidate for the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws must present satisfactory evidence of the fact 
that he is a graduate of a college of approved standing or that he has satis- 
factorily completed at least three years of regular residence work at such 
a college constituting not less than three-fourths of the work acceptable for 
a bachelor's degree granted on the basis of a four-year period of study. Addi- 
tional tests and requirements must be satisfactorily completed. 

There is no requirement that applicants for admission have college credit 
in any specified subjects. The prospective law student should seek a broad 
general education. It is important to be well trained in the use of English 
and to be able to write effectively. In addition, as many as possible of the 
following subjects should be studied: History; logic; philosophy; mathe- 
matics (at least the elementary courses) ; enough science to appreciate its 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



importance; some economics; government, and psychology. Some knowledge 
of sociology and the ability to speak are useful to a lawyer. 

The School of Law admits both men and women students as candidates for 
degrees. 

COMBINED COURSES 

A student who has completed three years of required work in the College 
of Arts and Sciences, the College of Business Administration, or the School 
of Journalism may substitute the first year of satisfactory work in the 
School of Law for his senior work and thus at the end of his fourth year 
of study receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Business Ad- 
ministration, or Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. However, this first degree 
will be granted only upon satisfactory completion of 185 quarter hours (186 
quarter hours for the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration), ex- 
clusive of Physical Education and Military or Air Science. On the successful 
completion of the two remaining years of work in the School of Law he 
will be entitled to receive the degree of Bachelor of Laws. A student may 
in this manner receive in six years both the academic and law degrees. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

The Dean may, in his discretion, give full credit for work done in other 
law schools which are members of the Association of American Law Schools. 
Under no circumstances, however, will advanced credit be given for more 
than two years of work. The last year of work on the basis of which a 
degree is granted must be taken in this School of Law. 

DIRECTIONS TO APPLICANTS FOR ADMISSION 

Every applicant for admission to the School of Law must present to the 
Dean a complete transcript of his college work, together with a small photo- 
graph of the applicant. Further tests and requirements will be necessary. 
Full information may be obtained at the time the application is submitted. 
The matter of registration will be simplified if this transcript is sent to the 
School of Law well in advance of the opening of the session which the appli- 
cant expects to attend. Such transcript may be procured from the registrar 
of the college or university at which the student's pre-legal work was done. 

DEGREES 

Bachelor of Laws. In order to receive this degree, a student must have 
completed not less than 120 quarter hours of work with a weighted average 
of at least a minimum C. 

The 120 quarter hours of work on the basis of which a degree is granted 
must include all the work of the first year, with the exception of Domestic 
Relations. The following courses in the work of the second and third years 
are required: Constitutional Law, Equity, Evidence, Georgia Practice, Prac- 
tice Court, and Property II. 

In order to receive a degree, a student must satisfy not only the require- 
ments specified above but must also have been in attendance at the School 
of Law for nine full quarters. The Dean may give credit for work done in 
other law schools approved by the Association of American Law Schools. 
However, in all cases the work of the three quarters immediately preceding 
the granting of a degree must be completed in this School. 

A student who completes a full summer session is credited with one quarter 
of residence toward the degree requirements. 

The faculty of the School of Law will, in its discretion, recognize unusual 
scholastic attainments of genuine distinction by awarding the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws summa cum laude, magna cum laude, or cum laude. 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 189 

Master of Laws. The School of Law has recently inaugurated a program 
leading to the degree of Master of Laws. A prerequisite is a Bachelor of 
Laws degree from an approved law school of quality indicating that graduate 
work may be pursued with profit. At least one academic year of full-time 
study is required, the thesis and not less than one-half of the student's course 
work being in the general field of law. The program for the degree provides 
opportunity for the student to specialize in a chosen field or to deepen his 
knowledge of law generally. Information regarding graduate work can be 
obtained from the Dean of the School of Law. 

No student may receive a degree without the favorable recommendation 
of the faculty, and this may be withheld for satisfactory cause although the 
required work has been completed. 

A candidate for a degree, unless excused in writing by the secretary of 
the faculty of the University, must attend the graduation exercises at which 
he expects a degree to be conferred upon him. 

THE HONOR SYSTEM 

In 1930 the student body of the School of Law unanimously adopted the 
Honor Code. Through the ensuing years it has been subscribed to and ad- 
ministered by the students. Upon entering the School of Law every student 
is provided with a copy of the Honor Code Constitution, which sets forth 
the requirements of the Honor System and the machinery for enforcing the 
same. The requirements are that a student shall act honorably in all rela- 
tions of student life. Lying, cheating, failure to report any instance of in- 
fraction of the Honor Code, or breaking one's word of honor, are condemned. 
After opportunity to examine the Honor Code Constitution and to acquaint 
himself with the environment of the School, each student is given the op- 
portunity to sign a pledge by which he promises to observe the provisions 
of the Honor Code. Upon subscribing to the pledge the student is thereafter 
bound by the provisions of the Honor Code during the time he remains in 
the School of Law. 

ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS 

The general regulations and requirements relating to the University as 
a whole apply to students in the School of Law except in so far as they may 
have been modified or changed by the Faculty of the School of Law with the 
approval of the President of the University. Students in the School of Law 
will be advised of such changes as may be made from time to time. 

REGISTRATION 
Students may enter the School of Law at the beginning of the Fall Quarter. 

Service fees for late registration will be assessed by the Registrar in ac- 
cordance with University regulations. 

A student is entitled to be registered as a second-year student when he has 
satisfactorily completed not less than thirty quarter hours of his first year's 
work. 

A student is entitled to be registered as a third-year student when he has 
satisfactorily completed not less than seventy-five quarter hours of work 
which must include all first-year required subjects. 

No student may, without special permission of the Dean, register for less 
than twelve hours of work per week in any quarter or take for credit more 
than sixteen hours of work. 

The courses of study in the School of Law are designed to occupy the full 
time of students, and no student in the School of Law may, without special 
permission of the Dean, take courses in other schools or departments of the 
University. 



190 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

AUDITORS 

A student who wishes to attend lectures in a course, but who does not 
wish to take the examination, may, with permission of the Dean, register 
as an auditor in that course. A student's record card will indicate the lec- 
tures which he attended as an auditor, but no credit toward a degree will 
be given for work so taken. The School of Law reserves the right to withdraw 
this privilege for any course in which the instructor deems it inadvisable to 
admit auditors. 

ATTENDANCE 

The right to take the examinations, as well as the privilege of continuing 
ones membership in the School, is conditioned upon regular attendance at 
classes and the other exercises of the School. A student who during a quarter 
incurs in any course a number of absences in excess of double the number 
of times which that course meets per week will be excluded automatically 
from the examination in that course, and only in exceptional cases will the 
student be permitted by the faculty of the School of Law to take the examina- 
tion. 

EXAMINATION AND GRADING SYSTEM 

Written examinations are given upon the completion of the various courses 
offered in the School. 

The work of each student is graded as follows: A; B+; B; C+; C; D+; D. 

Other marks are in use to indicate varying grades of work. They are: 

P— (Pass). 

F — (Failure). This grade may be converted into a higher grade only by 
repeating the work in the course. 

I — (Incomplete). This grade indicates that a student although doing satis- 
factory work was, for some reason beyond his control, unable to complete the 
course. 

W — Withdrawn from the course by permission with no grade assigned. 

WF — Indicates a course from which the student withdrew while doing 
unsatisfactory work. This grade carries the F value. 

EXCLUSION OF STUDENTS 

A student who, at the end of his first three quarters, or at the end of any 
quarter thereafter, does not have a weighted average grade of the minimum 
C on all work takn by him since entering the School of Law, shall not be 
entitled to continue in attendance except by special permission of the Dean 
and upon such showing and such conditions as the Dean may require. This 
permission will be granted only in unusual cases. 

FEES 

Students in the School of Law who are residents of the State of Georgia are 
required to pay each year (three quarters) a matriculation fee of $210.00. 

Students whose homes are not within the State of Georgia are required to 
pay each year (three quarters) a matriculation fee of $510.00. 

In the cases of both resident and non-resident students matriculation fees 
may be paid in quarterly installments. 

A student receiving a bachelor's degree from the School is charged a 
diploma fee of $8, which includes rental of cap and gown. 

Each student is required to pay during the registration period at the be- 
ginning of each quarter a health service fee of $2.50. 

All rates, including matriculation fees, room, and board, are subject to 
revision at the beginning of any quarter. 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 191 

EXPENSES 

The cost of new law books will average, through the three years, about 
$60 per year. Second-hand books may be had at less cost. 

The School of Law Dormitory, a handsome three-story brick building con- 
structed in 1939, accommodates some sixty students. There is provided in 
the living room a complete set of State reports, the code, and other law 
books. Charges, including laundry deposit, are approximately $50 a quarter, 
payable at registration. Other University dormitories are available for occu- 
pancy by law students. 

If a student prefers he may obtain board and lodging in a private home 
or boarding house. The prices for both rooms and meals vary considerably 
in the city. 

Incidental expenses are entirely within the control of the student and can- 
not be regulated by the University. 

LOAN FUNDS 

The University has the Brown Fund, the Lumpkin Fund, and other funds 
from which loans may be made to students. Law students may apply for these 
loans on the same basis as other students. Those who desire information 
regarding loans from these funds should write to the Director of Placement 
and Student Aid. 

The Georgia Bar Association has a fund from which loans can be made 
to a limited number of deserving students in need of financial assistance. 
Information regarding loans from this source can be obtained from the Dean 
of the School of Law. 

Mrr. Nettie Elsas Phillips has created a fund of $5,000 in memory of her 
husband, Benjamin Z. Phillips, a loyal alumnus of the School. The annual 
income of this fund is available for loans to students in the School of Law. 
Applications for loans from this source should be made to the Faculty of the 
School of Law. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF-HELP 

A number of students find it possible to earn part of the money necessary 
to pay their expenses. Those who desire information concerning opportunities 
for self-help should write to the Director of Placement and Student Aid. 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

The University recognizes that religious influences are essential to the 
well-rounded development of the individual. There is located on the Uni- 
versity campus a University of Georgia Religious Association which does 
much to serve the spiritual needs of the students and to provide for them 
wholesome social environment. The Association cooperates with student 
pastors and workers maintained by the Athens churches and, throughout 
the year, sponsors special programs for and by the students. 

FRATERNITIES 

In the School of Law are chapters of the Delta Theta Phi. Phi Alpha Delta, 
and Phi Delta Phi, legal fraternities for men, and Phi Delta Delta, legal 
fraternity for women. Law students are also eligible for membership in the 
local chapters of Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi. There are located at 
the University chapters of a number of the leading social fraternities of the 
country. Law students are eligible for membership in these fraternities. 



192 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

Students in the School of Law are eligible for membership in the two lit- 
erary societies of the University, Demosthenian and Phi Kappa. The former 
society has been functioning continuously since 1801 and the latter since 
1820. Regular weekly meetings are held at which students have an oppor- 
tunity to take part in pubic speaking and debating. The training derived 
from work done in these societies is of particular value to those preparing 
themselves for careers at the bar. 

PRIZES 

The Harrison Prize. The Harrison Company, law book publishers of 
Atlanta, offers as a prize to that member of the graduating class who makes 
the highest average during his third year a copy of Powell's Actions for 
Land. 

The Lawyers' Co-operative Publishing Company Prize. The Lawyers' 
Co-operative Publishing Company offers annually a prize to the member of 
the classes in Legal Method who makes the highest grade a copy of Ballen- 
tine's College Law Dictionary. 

Nathan Burkan Memorial Competition. The American Society of Com- 
posers, Authors, and Publishers annually offers a cash award of $100 to 
that student of the graduating class who submits the best paper on "Copy- 
right Law." 

Phi Delta Phi Prize. Wilson Inn. the local Chapter of Phi Delta Phi, pre- 
sents annually to that member of the first year class who makes the highest 
average during his first year a prize consisting of law books selected by the 
Inn. 

The Redfearn Prize. Mr. D. H. Redfearn, of the Miami bar, offers an 
award of $50 to that student writing the best article on "Suggested Changes 
in the Remedial Laws of Georgia." 

The Henry Shinn Memorial Award. The Alexander H. Stephens Chapter 
of Phi Alpha Delta National Legal Fraternity annually presents a certifi- 
cate and a $50 Government Bond to the student writer of the best legal arti- 
cle published during the year. The award is given in honor of the late Dr. 
Henry A. Shinn, an esteemed legal scholar and writer, and Acting Dean of 
The University of Georgia School of Law. 

GEORGIA BAR JOURNAL 

Each year the faculty selects a Student Editorial Board from the members 
of the second and third year classes. Members of the Board prepare notes 
and comments on recent cases for publication in the Georgia Bar Journal, 
the official publication of the Georgia Bar Association. The student editors 
are selected on the basis of scholarship. Academic credit is given for work 
satisfactory to the Faculty Advisors. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The University reserves the right to withdraw any course for which 
the registration is not sufficient and to offer any courses not here listed 
should sufficient demand arise and adequate teaching facilities and per- 
sonnel be available. 

FIRST YEAR 
Agency 

Four hours 
A study of the basic principles of the law of agency and master and ser- 
vant, including the liability of the master for torts of the servant and the 
independent contractor and the rights and liabilities of the principal and 
agent inter se and toward third persons. 

Mr. Feild 
Seavey's Cases on Agency. 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 193 

Contracts I and Contracts II 

Nine hours 

An introduction to the law of legally enforceable promises including offers 
and their acceptance; duration and termination of offers; consideration; 
requisites of contracts under seal; parties affected by contracts; parol evi- 
dence rule; statute of frauds; performance of contracts; effect of illegality; 
discharge of contracts. 

Mr. Hosch 

Williston's Cases on Contracts (5th edition). 

Criminal Law and Procedure 

Five hours 

A study of the criminal law, both common and statutory, including the 

historical development of this branch of law as well as the analysis of the 

necessary elements of crimes, and the consideration of the principal classes 

of crimes; procedure in criminal cases. 

Mr. McWhorter 

Harno's Cases arid Materials on Criminal Law and Procedure (3rd edition). 

Domestic Relations 

Four hours 
This course deals with certain important aspects of family law, including 
contracts to marry; marriage; annulment; separation and divorce; the rela- 
tions of husband and wife, and parent and child, with reference to property, 
support, alimony and custody; illegitimacy; adoption; guardian and ward; 
infancy. 

Mr. Jones 
McCurdy's Cases on Domestic Relations (3rd edition). 

Legal Method 

Four hours 

An introduction to the basic methods, sources, and literature of Anglo- 
American case law and legislation. Among the topics presented are: the 
sources and forms of American law, the analysis and synthesis of judicial 
precedents, the authoritative hierarchy of precedents, the interpretation of 
statutes and their uses as analogies in case law, some problems in the theory 
of legal reasoning, and the law as a system. 

Mr. Lenoir 

Dowling, Patterson and Powell's Cases and Materials on Legal Method. 

Civil Procedure 

Five hours 
General theory of actions as remedies; steps in an action; declarations; 
demurrers, pleas and replications; necessary allegations; parties; venue; 
process; jurisdiction; trials and verdicts; motions after verdicts. 

Mr. Green 
Magill and Chadbourn's Cases on Civil Procedure (3rd edition). 

Property I 

Five hours 
Actual and constructive possession of real and personal property; rights 
based on possession; liabilities based on possession; disseisin and ad- 
verse possession of land; disseisin and adverse possession of chattels; various 
methods of acquiring title to personal property; liens and pledges; fixtures; 
some rights incident to the ownership of land. 

Mr. McWhorter 

Aigler, Bigelow & Powell's Cases on Property, Volume I (2nd edition) 



194 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Torts I and Torts II 

Eight hours 

A general treatment of the principles underlying the laws of civil liability 
for conduct causing damage to others. Assault, battery, and false imprison- 
ment; negligence as a basis for liability; contributory negligence as a de- 
fense; injuries by animals; dangerous use of land; violation of statutory 
duties as a basis of civil liability; deceit; malicious prosecution; libel and 
slander; invasion of the rights of privacy; interference with advantageous 
relations; proximate causation; justification and excuse. 

Mr. Lenoir 

Seavey, Keeton and Thurston Cases on Torts. 

SECOND YEAR 
Administrative Law* 

Administrative power and action and its control by courts; discretion of 
administrative officials and their power to take summary action; hearings 
before administrative boards; legal and equitable relief against administra- 
tive action; finality of orders of administrative boards. 

Mr. Feild 

McFarland and Vanderbilt's Cases on Administrative Law. 

Admiralty* 

Three hours 
A study of admiralty jurisdiction, the law governing maritime liens, sea- 
men's rights, charter parties, salvage, general average, marine insurance, 
collision, and limitation of liability. Students are encouraged to do special 
work in the phases of Admiralty which interest them most. 

Mr. Lenoir 
Sprague and Healy Cases on Admiralty. 

Comparative Law* 

Two hours 
The main purpose of this course is to compare historically, analytically 
and critically the solution of legal problems by common law and civil law 
states. Practical problems will be selected from the field of contracts, torts, 
domestic relations and quasi contracts. The regular case method will be 
supplemented by lectures. 

Mr. Cohn 
Schlesinger's Cases and Materials on Comparative Law. 

Constitutional Law* 

Four hours 
Written constitutions and their amendment; power to declare laws un- 
constitutional; separation of powers; delegations of legislative power; limita- 
tions on legislative powers of State and Federal Governments; due process 
of law; police power; civil rights and their protection; protection afforded 
to contracts and property. 

Mr. Feild 
Dodd's Cases on Constitutional Law (4th edition). 

Corporations I and Corporations II* 

Seven hours 
The formation of private corporations; their powers and liabilities; prob- 
lems of defective organization and of ultra vires acts; the powers and liabili- 
ties of promoters and directors; the rights of stockholders and creditors and 
remedies available for their enforcement; the reorganization and dissolution 
of corporations and problems of corporate finance. 

Mr. Cohn 
Richard's Cases on Corporations (3rd edition). 



Registration open to third-year students. 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 195 

Equity I and Equity II 

Eight hours 
The nature of equity jurisdiction, the history of equity jurisprudence; 
powers of courts of equity; specific performance of contracts; subject-matter 
of the contract; affirmative and negative contracts; contracts for arbitra- 
tion and appraisal; damages in addition to or in lieu of specific perform- 
ance; equitable servitudes; consequences of the right to specific performance; 
partial performance with compensation; marketable titles; the statute of 
frauds; plaintiff's default or laches as a bar to relief; certain discretionary 
defenses to specific performance; lack of mutuality as a bar to relief. 

Mr. McWhorter 
Glenn and Redden's Cases on Equity. 

Evidence 

Five hours 
Judicial notice; examination of witnesses; competency and privileges of 
witnesses; relevancy; direct and circumstantial evidence; illegal obtain- 
ment; opinion evidence; hearsay; authentication and production of writings; 
interpretative evidence; functions of judge and jury; burden of proof; pre- 
sumptions. 

Mr. Green 
McCormick's Cases on Evidence (2nd edition) 

Georgia Practice 

Four hours 

The Georgia judicial system and jurisdiction of the various trial courts; 
remedies; pleading, practice and procedure in Georgia courts. 

Mr. Nix 
Davis and Shulman, Georgia Practice and Procedure 

Insurance 

Four hours 
General principles of insurance law. emphasizing life and fire, but con- 
sidering also accident, marine, and guaranty insurance. Making and con- 
struction of the contract; insurable interest; concealment; misrepresenta- 
tion; warranties; waiver; estoppel; power of agents; measure of recovery; 
rights of assignees and beneficiaries. 

Mr. Feild 
Vance's Cases on Insurance (3rd edition). 

International Law* 

Four hours 
Selected topics on international law; its nature, development and relation 
to municipal law; sovereignty, birth, recognition and death of nations; con- 
tinuity of state personality; succession, domain, nationality; international 
cooperation and adjustment of differences under special consideration of the 
Charter of the United Nations. 

Mr. Cohn 
Fenwick's Cases on International Law and Selected Materials. 

Legal Accounting 

Five hours 
Principles of accounting, with emphasis on the corporation, including 
problems of capital, profits, valuation, insolvency, and the analysis of finan- 
cial statements. Intended especially to provide an accounting background for 
courses in business units, taxation, trusts, and estates for students who had 
no previous training in accounting. 

Mr. Heckman 

Graham and Katz Accounting in Law Practice and Selected Materials. 



* Registration open to third-year students. 



196 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Negotiable Instruments 

Five hours 
The law of bills, notes and checks prior to the adoption of the Uniform 
Negotiable Instruments Law; the effect of this Act. 

Mr. Cohn 
Britton's Cases on Bills and Notes. 

Partnership 

Four hours 
Nature and creation of partnership as distinguished from other forms of 
business organization. Partnership assets. Powers and liabilities of partners. 
Relations of partners among themselves. 

Mr. Cohn 
Gilmore's Cases on Partnership (3rd edition). 

Property II 

Four hours 

Tenure, estates in land; common law conveyancing; covenants for title; 

delivery and acceptance of deeds; after-acquired titles; rents; covenants 

running with the land; waste; creation of easements or profits by express 

grant and by implication; licenses. 

Mr. McWhorter 

Aigler, Bigelow & Powell's Cases on Property, Volume I (2nd edition). 

Public Corporations* 

Four hours 
The history and development of public corporations; their nature; crea- 
tion, classification, liabilities, powers and duties; municipal corporations, 
their creation, alteration, dissolution, powers and duties, and actions by and 
against; quasi-public corporations, their nature, regulation and control. 

Stason's Cases on Municipal Corporations (2nd edition). 

Mr. McWhorter 
Sales* 

Four hours 
Deals with executory and executed contracts for the sale of personal prop- 
erty and with the rights and remedies of buyers and sellers under the com- 
mon law and Uniform Sales Act and in the State of Georgia. 

Mr. Cohn 
Void's Cases on Sales (2nd Edition). 

THIRD YEAR 
Appellate Brief Writing 

Four hours 

Provides students with actual practice in writing briefs and arguing cases 

before Courts of Appeal. Each student will be required to prepare a written 

appeal brief and argue from the brief before an appeal court. Members of the 

faculty, local lawyers, and jurists will preside at the hearings. 

Mr. Henderson 
Selected Materials. 

Appellate Procedure 

Four hours 
Procedure commonly followed in the review of cases in the various appel- 
late state courts of appeal, with special emphasis on the Georgia procedure. 
The following subjects are examined: the nature and methods of review; 
preparation for review; transfer of cases to appellate courts; brief-writing; 
disposition of cases on appeal. 

Mr. Nix 
Selected Materials. 



* Registration open to third-year students. 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 197 

Bankruptcy 

Four hours 
Jurisdiction of the United States and the several states; who may be a 
bankrupt; who may be petitioning creditors; acts of bankruptcy; what 
property passes to the trustee; provable claims; duties and powers of the 
bankrupt and his trustee; protection, exemption and discharge; composi- 
tions, extensions and reorganizations. 

Mr. Conn 

Hanna and McLaughlin's Cases on Creditors' Rights (4th edition). 

Conflict of Laws 

Four hours 
Jurisdiction over persons and things; domicile as a basis of personal juris- 
diction; law governing the creation of personal and property rights; the 
recognition and enforcement by one state of rights created by the laws of 
another state, including questions arising out of capacity, marriage, legiti- 
macy, and inheritance; the nature and effect of judgments and decrees, and 
their enforcement outside the jurisdiction where rendered. 

Mr. Hosch 

Cheatham, Dowling, Goodrich and Griswold Cases on Conflict of Laws (3rd 
Edition). 

Damages 

Four hours 
Nominal and exemplary damages; compensatory damages; direct and con- 
sequential damages in tort and contract cases; aggravation and mitigation 
of damages; liquidated damages; value; interest; counsel fees and other 
expenses of litigation; non-pecuniary losses; entirety of recovery; damages 
in specifications. 

Mr. Jones 
McCormick's Cases on Damages. 

Equity III 

Two hours 
Interpleader; bills of peace; bills quia timet for the cancellation and sur- 
render of contracts; removal of cloud on title; declaratory judgments. 

Mr. McWhorter 
Chafee's Cases on Equitable Remedies. 

Federal Procedure 

Three hours 
Nature, source and extent of the Federal judicial power. Original, removal, 
and appellate jurisdiction and procedure in the Federal Courts. State laws 
as rules of decision. Practice under the Rules of Civil Procedure. 

Mr. Green 

McCormick and Chadbourn's Cases on Federal Courts (2nd Edition). 

Government Regulation of Business 

Four hours 
In this course a study is made of contracts and combinations in restraint 
of trade, the Sherman anti-trust act, trade marks and trade names, regula- 
tion of advertising, appropriation of competitor's trade values and the mis- 
representation of his product, resale price fixing, tying agreements and 
national legislation against price discrimination. 

Mr. Henderson 
Handler's Cases on Trade Regulation. (2nd edition). 



198 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Jurisprudence 

Four hours 
Principal theories of law; law and morals; the various social and economic 
interests, and their competition with one another. How interests may come 
to be recognized as legal rights and enforced in the courts. 

Mr. Henderson 
Casebook to be announced. 

Labor Law 

Four hours 

History of the labor movement; interference with advantageous relations; 
inducing breach of contract; termination of relationship and legislative 
regulation of anti-union contracts. Conduct of a striker, and the right to 
strike. Federal intervention in labor controversies, including operation of 
National Labor Relations Board. 

Mr. Nix 

Handler's Cases and Materials on Labor Laic. 

Legislation 

Three hours 
A course in the techniques of drafting and interpreting legislation and the 
mechanics of legislative procedure. 

Mr. Green 
Cohen's Materials on Legislation. 

Military Law* 

Four hours 

Organization and functions of the Judge Advocate Generals' Corps; his- 
torical and constitutional basis of military law; substantive and procedural 
military justice; military habeas corpus; war crimes and military commis- 
sions; laws of war and related international law problems; military adminis- 
trative law problems; government contracts and procurement regulations; 
Federal Tort Claims Act and claims administration. 

Mr. Jones 

Manual for Courts-Martial 1951 and Selected Materials. 

Office Practice 

Four hours 
A study of the interpretation and draftmanship of statutes, administrative 
regulations, contracts, and corporate charters and bylaws; with special ref- 
erence to legislation, leases, escrow agreements, sales agreements, security 
transactions, and corporate papers; employing techniques of student drafts- 
manship and critique extensively. 

Mr. Henderson 

Cook's Cases and Materials on Legal Drafting. (Revised edition). 

Practice Court 

Two hours 

A course in practice to acquaint students with actual practice in trial 

courts. Students are required to prepare pleadings, issue process, file and 

docket suits, argue cases before court and jury, prepare verdicts, judgments 

and motions for new trial. 

Mr. Green 
Selected Materials. 



♦Registration open to second-year students. 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 199 

PROPERTY III 

Four hours 
Open only to students who have had the courses in Property I and Prop- 
erty II. Among the topics presented are: reversions, possibilities of reverter 
and rights of entry for condition broken, remainders and executory interests, 
vesting of future interests, limitations to classes and the rule against per- 
petuities. 

Mr. Lenoir 

Leach's Cases and Materials on Future Interests (2nd edition). 

Public Utilities 

Four hours 
Consideration of the evolution of the public utility concept, and of its 
present-day scope in American law. Especial attention is given to prob- 
lems of valuation and rate-control and to the regulation of public utilities by 
administrative commissions both State and Federal. 

Mr. Feild 
Smith, Dowling and Hale's Cases on Public Utilities. 

Real Estate Transactions 

Four hours 
A comprehensive course pertaining to the practical aspects of examination 
of titles, abstracts of titles, title insurance, real estate sales and real estate 
loans. 

Mr. Birchmore 
Selected Materials. 

Restitution 

Three hours 
A study of the legal consequences of various types of defects in the forma- 
tion and in the performance of contracts with special emphasis on available 
remedies, legal and equitable, contractual and quasi contractual. It deals 
with the right to the restitution of benefits conferred under mistake both 
of fact and of law. 

Mr. Feild 
Laube's Cases on Quasi Contracts. 

Security Transactions 

Four hours 

Deals with the problems which arise in connection with the subjects of 
suretyship and real estate and chattel mortgages. The following are among 
the many subjects discussed: creation of suretyship relation; surety's rights 
against the principal debtor; defenses of the surety; the subject of security 
interests in land; the creation of land security devices; priorities; assign- 
ment and enforcement of real estate security; real estate finance; pledges; 
conditional sales. 

Mr. Green 

Sturges' Cases on Credit Transactions (3rd edition). 

Taxation I — The Federal Income Tax 

Five hours 

In this course an effort is made to correlate the accounting and legal ap- 
proach to Federal income tax problems. Decisions interpreting the Federal 
income tax statutes are studied not only from the point of view of the legal 
concepts involved, but also with attention to the accounting aspects of the 
problem. The course includes the taxation of incomes of individuals, part- 
nerships and fiduciaries, with special attention to the problem of tax deduc- 
tions and credits. 

Mr. Heckman 

Casebook to be announced. 



200 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Taxation II — Federal Taxes Other Than The Income Tax 

Three hours 
Continuation of Taxation I. It is concerned with the legal and accounting 
problems arising from the Federal income tax of corporations, gift taxes 
and estate taxes. As in the preceding course, an effort is made to present 
both the accounting and legal aspects of a tax case for a better understand- 
ing of the problem as a whole. 

Mr. Heckman 
Casebook to be announced. 

Trusts 

Four hours 
Creation and elements of a trust, charitable trusts, resulting and construc- 
tive trusts, administration and termination of trusts, the transfer of the 
beneficial interest and liabilities to third parties. 

Mr. Lenoir 
Scott's Cases on Trusts (3rd edition). 

Wills 

Five hours 
A general survey of the law of wills dealing with execution, revocation, 
republication, and probate with a study of the laws of descent and distribu- 
tion. 

Mr. Feild 
Costigan's Cases on Wills (3rd edition). 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

THE FACULTY 
Kenneth Lee Waters, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Dean. 
Willena Dudley Bridges, Secretary. 



John Francis Burke, B.B.A., M.B.A., Associate Professor of Accounting. 

Woodrow R. Byrum, B.S.Pharm., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Willis Frank Dobbs, B.S.Pharm., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Co- 
ordinator Special Services, Division of General Extension. 

Boyce Moultrie Gilbert, Ph.G., Assista?it Professor of Pharmacy. 

Charles William Hartman, B.S.Pharm., Instructor in Pharmacy. 

Joseph Paul LaRocca, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy. 

Francis Ford Millikan, B.S.Pharm., M.S.Pharm., M.S.Chem., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy. 

Michael Edward Steblar, B.S.Pharm., Instructor in Pharmacy. 

Kenneth Lee Waters, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy and Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Robert Cumming Wilson, Ph.G., Dean Emeritus of the School of Pharmacy. 



Omer Clyde Aderhold, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., President of the University. 
Alvin Blocksom Biscoe, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of Faculties. 



Joseph Thomas Askew, Ph.B., M.A., LL.D., Dean of Student Affairs. 

Walter Newman Danner, Jr., B.S.A.E., M.S.A., Registrar and Director of 
Admissions. 

John Dixon Bolton, C.P.A., Comptroller and Treasurer. 



Courses other than Pharmacy are taught by faculties of other Schools and 
Colleges within the University. 

ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO DEAN, SCHOOL OF PHAR- 
MACY, UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA, ATHENS, GEORGIA. 



[ 201 ] 



202 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The School of Pharmacy was created and became an integral department 
of the University in 1903. During the first twenty-three years the pharmacy 
course extended over a period of two years. Students completing the course 
received the certificate, Graduate in Pharmacy. Beginning in September, 
1926, the four-year plan of study leading to the degree, Bachelor of Science 
in Pharmacy, was inaugurated. 

FUNCTIONS OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The primary function of the School of Pharmacy is to train young men 
and women for positions of responsibility in retail pharmacy or for service 
in one or more branches of pharmacy. It is felt that this can best be done 
by co-ordinating the instruction in the cultural and scientific courses with 
the instruction of a distinctly technical nature. An additional function is 
to give the graduate a proper conception of his professional responsibilities 
and thereby enable him to correlate his efforts with those of the medical 
profession and other public health agencies in the interest of public health. 

WOMEN IN PHARMACY 

Of the estimated 85,000 pharmacists in the United States approximately 
5,000 are women. In recent years about fifteen percent of students enrolled 
in colleges of pharmacy have been women, and the number is steadily in- 
creasing. Women function well in all capacities in pharmacy, particularly 
in the research and control laboratories of the pharmaceutical manufacturers, 
in hospital dispensaries, and in the retail practice of the profession. 

The suitability of pharmacy as a career for women is just beginning to 
be fully realized. There are no severe physical requirements which place 
them at a disadvantage; they can deal with the "drug store public" — a 
majority of which is composed of women — much more skillfully in many 
phases of pharmaceutical practice than men. In achieving the ambition of 
owning one's own business, women face highly favorable conditions in 
pharmacy, with certain special opportunities found in no other field; and, 
finally, the fact that the place for women in pharmacy is receiving somewhat 
belated recognition creates particularly auspicious circumstances for those 
who now select this profession. 

FACILITIES 

The School of Pharmacy occupies its own building, formerly known as 
New College. Laboratories, class rooms, and reading rooms are all well lighted 
and ventilated. A special feature of the instruction is provided in the Dis- 
pensing and Pharmacology laboratories which have been handsomely equipped 
through funds donated by a friend of the School. The building is near the 
Infirmary, the General Library, and the buildings in which Pharmacy stu- 
dents take most of their courses. 

MILITARY TRAINING 

All men students in the freshman and sophomore classes who are citizens 
of the United States and who are not physically disqualified or otherwise 
exempted must take the basic courses in military or air science and tactics. 
The basic courses are Military Science 1-2 and Air Science 5-6. 

Those students who satisfactorily complete the basic training may apply 
for admission to the Advanced Military Training. It is the mission of the 
Senior Division of the ROTC to produce junior officers who have the quali- 
ties and attributes essential to their progressive and continued development 
as officers in the Army and Air Force of the United States. 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 203 

DEGREES OFFERED BY THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

B. S. Pharmacy 

The School of Pharmacy offers the degree of Bachelor of Science in Phar- 
macy upon completion of the required 192 quarter hours of academic work. 

Students planning to study pharmacy should enter at the beginning of the 
freshman year, or not later than the second year, since three academic years 
(9 quarters) of residence in the School of Pharmacy is required for gradu- 
tion. 

M. S. Pharmacy 

The University of Georgia Graduate School offers the degree of Master of 
Science in Pharmacy, the Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmacy being the 
prerequisite. 

A student will be admitted to candidacy for this degree only after he has 
shown a reading knowledge of either French or German and after he has 
passed preliminary written or oral examinations given by the School of Phar- 
macy. These examinations cover in a general way the division of pharmacy, 
pharmaceutical analysis, pharmacology, and organic medicinal chemistry. 
Candidates will choose one of their minors outside the School of Pharmacy. 
Application for admission to candidacy must be filed with the Dean of the 
Graduate School before the first day of classes of the final quarter of full 
residence. 

The thesis must be written, approved by the major professor and placed in 
the hands of the Dean of the Graduate School at least three weeks before the 
date of graduation. 

ADMISSION TO THE FIRST YEAR CLASS 

Application for admission should be made as early as possible after 
graduation from high school. The applicant must have his principal send 
his complete high school record to the Director of Admissions. No applica- 
tion is complete and consequently can not be accepted or rejected until this 
record has been received by the Director of Admissions. Applicants who are 
not in the upper half of the High School class will be required to take the 
pharmacy aptitude test before consideration will be given to their applica- 
tion. 

ADMISSION TO SECOND YEAR CLASS 

The number admitted to the second year class is governed by the number 
of vacancies. To be admitted to the second year class the applicant must 
submit a minimum of forty quarter hours which count toward the B.S. in 
Pharmacy degree. Ten hours must be in Chemistry and the remaining 30 
chosen from the following: Human Biology, Vertebrate Zoology, English, 
College Algebra, Physics, Economics, or Political Science. Selection of stu- 
dents for admission to the second year class will be based on the previous 
collegiate record of the applicant and his general aptitude for Pharmacy. 
Applicants should have a "C+" average before applying for admission to the 
second year class. Those applicants having a lower average must take the 
pharmacy aptitude test before consideration will be given to their applica- 
tion. 

This School, and other member Schools of the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy, require a student to spend a minimum of nine quar- 
ters in a school of pharmacy. Because of the sequence of courses, this gen- 
erally requires three calendar years, regardless of the amount of advanced 
credit offered. 

Application for admission to the second year class, and an official tran- 
script of all college work taken must be sent to the Dean of the School of 
Pharmacy. Applications should be submitted as early as possible. The Com- 
mittee on Admissions usually makes the initial selection during the Spring 
Quarter. 



204 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE 

Practical experience may be obtained any time after the applicant has 
graduated from high school, and has passed his sixteenth birthday. No credit 
for practical experience is given when obtained concurrently with school 
work. 

All apprentice pharmacists must notify the Chief Drug Inspector, Georgia 
State Board of Pharmacy, 38A Capitol Square, S.W., Atlanta 3, Georgia, with- 
in five days after starting to work, if credit for practical experience is de- 
sired. The pharmacist supervising the apprentice must also notify the Chief 
Drug Inspector that the apprentice is under his supervision. Termination 
of any portion of the apprenticeship must be reported by the pharmacist and 
the apprentice. 

All practical experience must be recorded in a notebook in diary form and 
must be certified by a pharmacist or pharmacists supervising the experience. 
Upon the completion of the apprenticeship, the notebook must be notarized 
and submitted to the State Board of Pharmacy at the time of the examina- 
tion. This "notebook" requirement applies to all who registered in the School 
of Pharmacy subsequent to September 1, 1947. 

THE COOPERATIVE PLAN OF STUDY 

Under this plan of study the student will make arrangements with a 
pharmacist in any town in the state to work alternate quarters while at- 
tending the University. It will be advantageous to the pharmacist, the stu- 
dent and to the University if students can be placed in pairs. The coopera- 
tive plan of study has the advantage over the usual plan of study in that 
it permits the student to obtain practical experience without interference 
with his scholastic duties. The plan has the further advantage in that it 
will enable a student with limited financial support to pay his own way 
through school. 

Requirements of the cooperative plan of study are exactly the same as 
those for the conventional program. Twelve quarters of college work is re- 
quired, nine of which must be in residence at the School of Pharmacy. If 
the student desires to reduce the length of time he must spend at the Uni- 
versity he may take certain non-professional courses in an accredited school 
or University Off Campus Center. These courses may be taken either prior 
to starting the Co-op plan or during "work quarters," but in no case can the 
residence requirement be reduced below nine quarters. 

Only students with proven ability will be accepted for the cooperative plan 
of study. Evidence of the student's ability will be based on previous college 
record — or if the applicant has no previous college training — on the recom- 
mendation of the University Guidance Center in Athens who will administer 
an aptitude test to determine the applicant's ability to do satisfactory college 
work. It is desirable that the applicant have the recommendation of a regis- 
tered pharmacist. 

Applicants interested in the cooperative plan of study should write to the 
Dean, School of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. 

SPECIAL REGULATIONS 

Class Attendance — Students in the School of Pharmacy must observe 
strict absence regulations administered by the Dean of the School of Phar- 
macy. Absence from classes or other evidence of indifference on the part 
of a student results in failures; and, since students in the School of Phar- 
macy are preparing for a definite professional career, indifference to college 
work will not be condoned. A student who incurs an excessive number of 
absences may be placed on probation or dismissed from the University. 

Special Scholarship Requirements — In addition to the general Univer- 
sity requirements relative to scholarship, the following requirement must 
be met by all pharmacy students: 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 205 



"Any student registered in the School of Pharmacy who, at the end of the 
second year, does not have a weighted average of 70 or more in all work 
taken since entering the School of Pharmacy, will not be entitled to con- 
tinue in attendance in the School except by special permission of the Phar- 
macy faculty. Such permission will be granted only in exceptional cases." 

At least a grade of "C" must be earned in all required Pharmacy courses 
and approved substitutes, before credit for the course will be given toward 
graduation. 

Classification of Students — The academic and the School of Pharmacy 
classification of students may not necessarily be the same. Other under- 
graduate schools and colleges of the University require students to have 
completed a minimum of thirty-seven hours with an average grade of "C" 
or better to be classified as a sophomore. The School of Pharmacy requires 
a student to have completed forty hours with an average grade of "C" or 
better to be classified as a second-year student. To be classified as a third- 
year student, eighty-five hours must have been completed and as a fourth- 
year student, one hundred and forty-two hours must have been completed. 
In classifying students, only those courses which may be credited toward 
the B.S. in Pharmacy degree will be counted. An average grade of "C" must 
be made in these courses. A student may not be permitted to take second- 
year, third-year or fourth-year courses in the School of Pharmacy unless he 
is classified as a second-year, third-year or fourth-year student respectively. 
The classification under which a student registers at the beginning of the 
academic year will continue through that year. 

Electives — A five hour non-professional non-applied elective course will 
be required for graduation. Students who have indicated they will not enter 
retail pharmacy may petition the faculty for permission to make suitable 
substitutions in related fields. 

Special Examinations — All entering freshmen are required to take regular 
placement examinations. Pharmacy applicants may be required to take 
other examinations which will show their general aptitude for Pharmacy. 
Students showing a deficiency in mathematics or in reading ability may be 
required to take certain non-credit courses to remove this deficiency. 

Limitation on Student Employment — Since it is realized that the class- 
room work is only a part of the student's program in securing an educa- 
tion, a student should not accept employment which will interfere with his 
scholastic program. A student who makes a poor scholastic record will 
be required to reduce his working load or his scholastic load. 

STUDENT AID 

The Women's Auxiliary of the Georgia Pharmaceutical Association lends 
a small amount of money each year to deserving students in the junior and 
senior years who are making creditable marks. This loan is handled by the 
Auxiliary on recommendation of the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

Other University loan funds are open to pharmacy students. Generally 
these are made available only to students who have completed their first 
year's work. 

THE ROBERT CUMMING WILSON AWARD 

The Robert Cumming Wilson Award is given to a member of the senior 
class in pharmacy who excels in scholarship, character and interest in the 
ideals of pharmacy. The amount of this award depends on the income from 
a fund set aside for this purpose by I. Z. Harris, Class of 1915. The mini- 
mum is fifty dollars. 

ATLANTA DRUG AND CHEMICAL CLUB AWARDS 

The Atlanta Drug and Chemical Club annually award two cash prizes of 
twenty-five dollars each. One prize is given to an honor student who excels 
in pharmacy, and the other is given to an honor student who excels in 
pharmaceutical chemistry. Fourth year students are eligible for the prize. 



206 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

RHO CHI AWARD 

The Alpha Kappa Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary Pharmaceutical 
Society, each year offers an award to an outstanding first year student. 

OTHER AWARDS 

Additional awards are made by pharmaceutical firms in recognition of out- 
standing achievements in extra-curricular activities and also to students 
judged outstanding in practical pharmacy. These prizes usually consist of 
coveted pharmacy reference books. 

FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education offers scholar- 
ships to deserving students who need financial assistance to complete their 
education. Third and fourth year students with high academic averages are 
eligible. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

University Activities — Since the School of Pharmacy is an integral part 
of the University, its students participate in all University educational, fra- 
ternal, literary, athletic, and social activities. 

Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association — In addi- 
tion to general activities of the University, students in the School of Phar- 
macy maintain a Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
toin, the function of which is to establish a closer fraternal and social 
relationship among students in pharmacy and to broaden their outlook by 
bringing in speakers on topics related to some health activity. 

All students are urged to become active members of this organization. 

Georgia Pharmacist — The official publication of the Student Branch of 
the Amercian Pharmaceutical Association is the Georgia Pharmacist. It is 
published by the students and is mailed to all pharmacists in the State of 
Georgia and to the alumni of the School of Pharmacy. 

Rho Chi — Alpha Kappa Chapter of Rho Chi was established at the Uni- 
versity of Georgia in 1949. Charters for chapters of this organization are 
granted only to groups in schools or colleges that are members in good 
standing of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Eligibility 
for membership in the Society is based on high attainment in scholarship, 
character, personality, and leadership. 

Kappa Psi — The professional pharmaceutical fraternity of Kappa Psi, Gam- 
ma Phi Chapter, was established at the University of Georgia in 1951. Eligible 
students are selected by the membership of the fraternity. 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



207 



REQUIRED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR 
OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 



(For Students entering after September 1, 1952) 

A total of 192 hours, in addition to Military Science or Air Science and 
Physical Education, are required for graduation. 



Fall 

Hours 

Chemistry 21 5 

Pharmacy 11 1 

English 2x 5 

Mathematics lOlx 5 

Mil. Sci. la or 

Air Sci. 5a 2 

Physical Education... 



Fiest Year 

Winter 

Hours 

Chemistry 22 5 

Pharmacy 12 1 

English 2y 5 

Human Biology 1 5 

Mil. Sci. lb or 

Air Sci. 5b 2 

Physical Education... 



Spring 

Hours 

Chemistry 23 5 

Pharmacy 13 1 

Political Science 1 5 

Human Biology 2 5 

Mil. Sci. lc or 

Air Sci. 5c 1 

Physical Education ... 



IS 



Fall 

Hours 

Chemistry 340a 5 

Zoology 26 5 

Pharmacy 301 3 

Pharmacy 321 3 

Mil. Sci. 2a or 

Air Sci. 6a 2 

Physical Education. ... 

18 



Fall 

Hours 

Pharmacy 331 5 

Pharmacy 377 5 

Pharmacy 341 3 

Economics 5x _ 5 



18 
Second Year 

Winter 

Hours 

Chemistry 340b 5 

Zoology 390 5 

Pharmacy 302 3 

Pharmacy 322 3 

Mil. Sci. 2b or 

Air Sci. 6b 2 

Physical Education. 

18 
Third Year 

Winter 

Hours 

Pharmacy 332 5 

Pharmacy 378 3 

Pharmacy 342 3 

Bacteriology 350 5 



17 



Spring 

Hours 

Chemistry 380 5 

Physics 20 5 

Pharmacy 303 3 

Pharmacy 323* 3 

Mil. Sci. 2c or 

Air Sci. 6c 1 

Physical Education... 

17 



Spring 

Hours 

Pharmacy 333 5 

Pharmacy 376 5 

Pharmacy 343 _ 3 

Bacteriology 352 3 



13 



Fall 

Hours 

Pharmacy 381 5 

Elective** 5 

Pharmacy 334 3 

Pharmacy 392 3 



16 
Fourth Year 

Winter 

Hours 

Pharmacy 382 5 

Pharmacy 310 5 

Pharmacy 335 3 

Pharmacy 393 3 



16 



Spring 

Hours 

Pharmacy 383 5 

Pharmacy 390 3 

Pharmacy 336 3 

Pharmacy 394 3 



16 



16 



14 



Fourth Year Class Trips — Members of the fourth year class annually visit 
hospitals, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and wholesale houses. Although not 
required, all fourth year students are urged to participate in such excursions. 



♦Pharmaceutical arithmetic achievement test prerequisite for this course. 
**This elective must not be a professional or applied course. 



208 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

The University reserves the right to withdraw any course for which the 
registration is not sufficient and to offer courses not here listed should 
sufficient demand arise and teaching facilities and personnel be available. 

Unless otherwise indicated all courses meet five times a week and carry 
five hours credit. 

lx. Remedial Pharmaceutical Abithmetic. 3 hours. Mr. Gilbert and 
Mr. Hartman. 

A course designed for students who are deficient in the principles of elementary 
arithmetic. The course will meet five times per week, although only 3 credit hours 
will be given. Students showing deficiency in pharmaceutical arithmetic achieve- 
ment tests will be required to take the course as a prerequisite to Pharmacy 323. 

11-12-13. Phabmacy Orientation. 3 hours. (1 hour each quarter). The 

Staff. 

Lectures will serve to initiate the student into the profession of pharmacy. The 
history and ethics of the profession will be discussed. A study of pharmacy litera- 
ture, and the system of weights and measures will be introduced. 

321. Intboductoby Phabmacy. 3 hours. Mr. Millikan and Mr. Waters. 

A discussion of the technical operation of pharmacy, including definitions and 
official preparations. 

322. Intboductoby Phabmacy. 3 hours. Mr. Millikan and Mr. Waters. 

The inorganic preparations of pharmacy with the special application of chemistry 
to the official preparations. 

323. Intboductoby Phabmacy. 3 hours. Mr. Gilbert and Mr. Hartman. 

(Those students showing deficiency in the pharmaceutical arithmetic achievement 
tests will be required to take Pharmacy lx as a prerequisite for this course.) 
A study of calculations involved in the practice of the profession of pharmacy. 

331-332-333. Juniob Dispensing. 15 hours. (5 hours each quarter). Three 
hours lecture and six hours laboratory weekly. Mr. Hartman, Mr. LaRocca, 
and Mr. Steblar. 

The general consideration of the underlying principles of prescription compound- 
ing. Laboratory work will involve the various types of preparations, and the filling 
of simple prescriptions. 

334-335-336. Seniob Dispensing. 9 hours. (3 hours each quarter). One 
hour lecture and six hours laboratory weekly. A continuation course of 
331-332-333. Mr. Gilbert, Mr. Hartman, Mr. LaRocca, and Mr. Steblar. 

A thorough study of prescription compounding, with emphasis on prescription 
reading and incompatibilities. The filling of prescriptions received by telephone is 
stressed. The lectures present and discuss the problems confronting the practicing 
pharmacist. A knowledge of typing is desirable for this course. 

395. Household and Animal Health Pboducts. (Elective). 3 hours. Three 
hours lecture and recitation. Prerequisite: Fourth year classification. The 

Staff. 

The study of fumigants, rodenticides, insecticides, fungicides, weedicides, para- 
siticides and toxins, serums, vaccines and related products commonly sold in the 
drug store. Ethics, economic and legal aspects will be stressed. 

398. Undebgbaduate Reseabch Pboblem. (Elective). 3 to 5 hours. Pre- 
requisites: Fourth year classification with an average grade of "B." The 
Staff. 

An introduction to research. The course is designed to acquaint the student with 
the techniques of research. A problem will be assigned and the student will be ex- 
pected to do library and laboratory work necessary to prepare an acceptable report. 

399. Pbactical Aspects of Phabmacy. (Elective). Five hours lecture and 
recitation. Prerequisite: Fourth year classification. The Staff. 

A course designed to bring together the salient subject matter from pharmacog- 
nosy, pharmacology, pharmaceutical chemistry, and pharmacy, in order that the 
practical aspects of theoretical subjects may be successfully applied to the retail 
drug field. 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

301-302-303. Pharmacognosy. 9 hours (3 hours each quarter). Three 
hours lecture and recitation. Mr. Byrum and Mr. Dobbs. 

A study of the history, distribution, collection, commerce, preservation, classifi- 
cation, active constituents, titles, synonyms, definitions, official preparations, thera- 
peutic use and common proprietaries of crude vegetable drugs. Specimens are fur- 
nished each student for macroscopical and organoleptic identification. 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 209 

PHARMACOLOGY 

381-382-383. Pharmacology. 15 hours (5 hours each quarter). Three hour3 
lecture and six hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: Zoology 26 and 390, 
Pharmacy 333 and 343. Mr. Byrum and Assistants. 

An introduction to pharmacology dealing wtih the modification of the normal 
physiological processes of the body by the presence of the more common drugs used 
in medicine. Drugs of the United States Pharmacopoeia. National Formulary, and 
selected items from the New and Non-Official Remedies are discussed according 
to pharmacological action, toxicology, and therapeutic application. Some attention 
will be given to problems related to public health and first aid. 

PHARMACEUTICAL ADMINISTRATION 

310. Pharmaceutical Accounting. Five hours lecture and recitation. 
Mr. Burke. 

Elementary accounting principles and procedures suitable for small and medium- 
sized drug stores operated by independent owners. 

390. Pharmaceutical Laws. 3 hours. Three hours lecture and recita- 
tion. Mr. Waters. 
A review of the various laws involved in pharmaceutical practice. 

392-393-394. Drugstore Operations. 9 hours (3 hours per quarter). Mr. 
Dobbs and Mr. Gilbert. 

A study of the methods, policies and practices pertaining to modern merchandising 
techniques, as buying, pricing, sales promotion, etc., the planning of lay-out and 
physical equipment that has proven successful in drug stores of America. This course 
will also cover the principles of stock control and advertising. 

Economics 5x. Principles of Economics. The Economics Staff. 
A description and critical analysis of the organization of modern society from an 
economic point of view, with a brief introduction to the theory of value and dUtri- 
bution. 

Business Administration 7. Personal Typing.* No academic credit (five 
periods a week). Business Administration Staff. 

An introductory course in typewriting designed to teach in a minimum of time 
typewriting for personal use. Should be taken before registering for Pharmacy 334. 

Business Administration 8. Business Correspondence.* 3 hours. Busi- 
ness Administration Staff. 

Qualities and principles of effective business letter writing; practice in writing 
various types of letters and reports. 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

341-342-343. Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 9 hours. (3 hours each 
quarter). Prerequisite: 321-322-323 and Chemistry 340 a-b. Mr. Millikan. 

A study of the chemistry of important pharmaceutical organic products to include 
sources, properties, reactions, and methods of production, with the general consid- 
eration between relationship of structure and activity of natural and synthetic or- 
ganic medicinals which are used in pharmaceutical practice. 

376. Biopharmacy. Three hours lecture, six hours laboratory. Mr. Milli- 
kan and Mr. Waters. 

A study of biochemistry and those problems closely related to pharmacy which 
are of importance to the practicing pharmacist. 

377. Pharmaceutical Assay. Two hours lecture, nine hours laboratory. 
Mr. Millikan and Mr. Waters. 

A study of the official and standard methods of assay of some common pharma- 
ceuticals. The student is familiarized with instrumentation procedures as used by 
the modern pharmaceutical firm. 

378. Advanced Theoretical Pharmacy. 3 hours. Two lecture and three 
hours laboratory. Mr. Millikan and Mr. Waters. 

A study of the certain theoretical concepts of pharmaceutical preparations, includ- 
ing physicochemical considerations of stability and of manufacturing. 



•Elective credit — highly recommended for all students. 



210 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

ZOOLOGY 

26. General Zoology. Two hours of lecture and six hours laboratory- 
weekly. Mr. Odum and Assistants. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and natural history of the 
vertebrate animals. 

390. Physiology. Three hours lecture and six hours laboratory. Miss 
Hamilton and Mr. Schoenoorn. 

An introduction to general physiological processes with major emphasis being 
placed on the physiology of vertebrates. Prerequisites Zoo 26 and Chemistry 346 
or equivalent. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

350. Introductory Bacteriology. Two hour lecture and recitations and 
six hours laboratory weekly. Breakage deposit $2.50. Prerequisites: Chem- 
istry 21-22 and two courses in Biological Science. Bacteriology Staff. 

352. Pathogenic Bacteriology. 3 hours. Bacteriology Staff. 
Infectious diseases of man with special application to problems closely related to 
the practice of retail pharmacy, including aspects of public health. 

BIOLOGY 
1-2. Human Biology. Double course. 10 hours (five hours a quarter). 

CHEMISTRY 

21. Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours lecture or recitation and three 
hours laboratory weekly. Breakage deposit, $5. Chemistry Staff. 

A general course in the chemistry of non-metallic elements, including a systematic 
treatment of chemical principles and their applications. 

22. Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours lecture or recitation and three 
hours laboratory weekly. Breakage deposit, $5. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21. 
Chemistry Staff. 

23. Qualitative Inorganic Analysis. Two hours lecture or recitation and 
nine hours laboratory weekly. Breakage deposit, $5. Prerequisite: Chemis- 
try 22 or 24. Chemistry Staff. 

The fundamental theories of qualitative analysis and analyses of the common 
cations and anions. 

340 a-b. Organic Chemistry. 10 hours. Four hours lecture or recitation 
and three hours laboratory weekly. Breakage deposit, $10 ($5 for each 
quarter). Prerequisite: Chemistry 21-22 with a minimum grade of 70. Chem- 
istry Staff. 

Chemistry 340a — The aliphatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives. Chemistry 340b — 
a continuation of 340a and a treatment of the coal tar compounds. 

380. Quantitative Inorganic Analysis. Two lectures and nine hours lab- 
oratory weekly. Breakage deposit, $5. Prerequisite: Chemistry 23. Chem- 
istry Staff. 

The fundamental theories of quantitative analysis and typical gravimetric, volu- 
metric and acidimetric analysis. 

ENGLISH 

2 x-y. Composition. 10 hours (5 hours a quarter). English Staff. 

First quarter: grammar, punctuation, mechanics, diction, and sentence structure. 
Second quarter : readings from English and American literature. Themes and parallel 
reading required throughout the course. Conferences on themes and reading. 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 211 



MATHEMATICS 

lOlx. College Algebra. Prerequisite: At least two units of high school 
mathematics, including one year of algebra. Students will be required to 
take algebra placement examinations before being permitted to enroll in 
this course. Mathematics Staff. 

Review of some elementary algebra, quadratic equations, binominal theorem, pro- 
gressions, complex numbers, theory of equations, permutations, combinations and 
probability. 

PHYSICS 

20. Physics Survey. Four lectures and two hours laboratory weekly. 
Physics Staff. 

An elementary survey of the development of physics with a study of some of the 
simpler applications of physics. The laboratory work will be devoted to measurements 
designed to give an introduction in laboratory methods. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

1. American Government. Political Science Staff. 

An introductory course covering the essential facts of federal, state, and local gov- 
ernment. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

For any graduate course in Pharmacy the prerequisites are two senior 
division courses in Pharmacy or related subjects, plus any specified pre- 
requisites. 

410. Pharmaceutical Control and Analysis. Two lecture and nine hours 
laboratory weekly. Mr. Millikan and Mr. Waters. 

Lectures, reading and analytical procedures of more complicated nature taken from 
USP, NF and AOAC. Pharmaceutical control methods are studied. 

411-412. Synthetic Medicinal Products. 5 hours each quarter. Five lec- 
ture periods per week each quarter. Mr. LaRocca. 

The chemistry and synthesis of antihistaminics, etc. Special emphasis to be placed 
on correlation of structure with physiological activity and industrial application of 
processes. 

414-415. Organic Pharmaceutical Synthesis. 5 hours each quarter. One 
consultation and eight laboratory hours per week each quarter. Mr. La- 
Rocca and Mr. Waters. 

Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various medicinal chemi- 
cals and their intermediates. 

420. Institutional Pharmacy. 3 hours. Three lecture periods. Prerequi- 
sites: Pharmacy 361. Mr. Byrum, Mr. LaRocca, and Mr. Waters. 

A study of institutional pharmacy including the large professional store. Methods 
of purchasing, stock control, storage, coordination of operations, and management 
of related departments are included. 

421. Special Topics in Pharmacy. 2 hours. Two lecture periods. Mr. 

Millikan. 

A study of newer pharmaceutical preparations and to include the detailed exami- 
nations of preparations involving chemical and special assigned topics. 

422. Pharmaceutical Technology. Two lecture and nine laboratory hours 
weekly. Mr. Millikan and Mr. Waters. 

Lectures to include a study of different equipment used in pharmaceutical manu- 
facturing. Laboratory work to involve pilot plant scale manufacturing. 

423. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology. Two lecture and nine labora- 
tory hours weekly. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 422. Mr. Millikan and Mr. 
Waters. 

Lecture and laboratory work will place special emphasis on the more complicated 
procedures encountered in manufacturing. Such topics as enteric coating, tablet granu- 
lations, special and parenteral solutions, and organization of pharmaceutical manu- 
facturing establishments will be taken up. 



212 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

430. Problems on Drug Standardization by Biological Methods. Two lec- 
ture and three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 382. Mr. 
Byrum. 

A survey of the field of bioassay with a specific study of one or more methods in 
order to demonstrate the development of a satisfactory procedure. The application 
of statistical methods to the problems of biological assay is studied. 

431. Studies in Pharmacodynamics. Two hours lecture and nine hours 
laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: Pharmacy 382. Mr. Byrum. 

Lectures, library assignments, and laboratory work dealing with the mechanics of 
the interaction of chemicals and living matter. Interference with enzymic processes, 
structural antagonisms, and the relationship of chemical structure to biological ac- 
tivity are stressed. Students will participate in departmental research. 

432. Methods in Pharmacological Research. 3 hours. Prerequisite: 
Pharmacy 382. Mr. Byrum. 

Lectures and library projects designed to acquaint the student with current methods 
and techniques used in the pharmaceutical evaluation of drugs. 

Address all correspondence to the Dean, School of Pharmacy, Univer- 
sity of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

THE FACULTY 

Calvin Clyde Murray, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Agriculture 
and Director of the Experiment Stations and Extension Service. 

Walter Scott Brown, B.S.A., Associate Director of the Agricultural Exten- 
sion Service. 

Paul Wilber Chapman, B.S.A., B.S.Ed., M.S.A., Sc.D., Associate Dean of In- 
struction of the College of Agriculture. 

George Harris King, B.S.A., M.S.A., Associate Director of Experiment Sta- 
tions. 

Edmund Broadus Browne, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Resident Director of the College 
Experiment Station. 

Fred Frazier Cowart, B.S., Ph.D., Resident Director of the Georgia Experi- 
ment Station. 

Dean Dlllard Hayes, B.S.A., Branch Station Superintendent (Calhoun, Ga.). 

Frank Pickett King, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Resident Director of the Georgia 
Coastal Plain Experiment Station. 

N. Duncan McRainey, B.S.A., Branch Station Superintendent (Plains, Ga.). 

Kenneth Treanor, B.S.A., Branch Station Superintendent (Midville, Ga.). 

Lucile Etheridge Bailey, Secretary (Mountain Experiment Station). 

Mozelle Griffeth Chick, Secretary. 

Martha Ltddell Diaz, B.S.H.E., Secretary. 

Miriam Thurmond Drewry, B.B.A., Secretary. 

Margaret Chick Ftror, Secretary. 

Dorothy Cannon Jenkins, B.S., Secretary (Coastal Plain Experiment Sta- 
tion). 

Reba Waller Pace, Secretary. 

Elizabeth Winn Scoggins, Secretary (Georgia Experiment Station). 



Virgil Emerson Adams, B.S., Assistant Editor (Extension) . 

William Eugenius Adams, B.S., M.S.A., Associate Agronomist, Research Divi- 
sion, Soil Conservation Service, U.S.D.A. 

Emory DeWitt Alexander, B.S.A., M.S.A., Agronomist (Extension) . 

Frances Leonora Anderson, B.S.H.E., District Agent (Extension). 

Robert Floyd Anderson, B.S., Assistant Agricultural Economist (Experiment, 
Georgia). 

John Scott Andrews, B.S., M.S., Sc.D., Parasitologist (Tifton, Georgia), 
U.S.D.A. 

[213] 



214 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Emory Dugas Appling. B.S.A., Soil Technician, Soil Testing Service. 

John Edward Bailey, B.S.A., Associate Horticulturist and Superintendent of 
the Mountain Experiment Station (Blairsville, Georgia). 

Ralph Swinton Bailey, Agricultural Aid (Tifton, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

Wallace Kincaid Bailey, B.S., M.S., Horticulturist (Experiment, Georgia), 
U.S.D.A. 

Derwood McVey Baird, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Animal Husbandman, (Ex- 
periment, Ga.) 
Wilfred Wickes Ballard, Agronomist (Experiment, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

Aurelius Pharr Barnett, B.S.A.E., Research Associate in Agricultural Engi- 
neering and Agricultural Engineer, Soil Conservation Service, U.S.D.A. 

Edwin Gottlieb Beck, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Clifford Myron Beckham, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Entomologist, Head of the De- 
partment of Entomology, and Chairman of the Division of Entomology 
(Experiment, Georgia). 

Charles Elwood Bell, Jr., B.S.A., Associate Animal Husbandman (Exten- 
sion). 

Ida Lou Bell. B.S.H.E., District Agent (Extension). 

♦♦Frederick William Bennett, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Dairy. 

Herbert William Bennett, B.S.A., Associate Poultry man (Extension) . 

Huey Ingles Borders, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Plant Pathologist (Tifton, Georgia), 
U.S.D.A. 

Roy Alva Bowden, B.S.A., M.S., Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

Hudson Lester Boyd, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistayit Agronomist. 

Nellie Clyde Boyd, B.S., M.S., Associate Home Economist — Nutrition (Exten- 
sion). 

Clyde Irwin Boyer, Jr., D.V.M., Associate Veterinarian (Tifton, Georgia). 

Lytton Wesley Boyle, B.S.. M.S., Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist (Ex- 
periment, Georgia). 

Blake Bridges Brantley, Jr., B.S., M.S., Assistayit Horticulturist (Experi- 
ment, Georgia). 

Donald LeRoy Branyon, B.S.A., M.S.A., Associate Agronomist (Exte?ision) . 

William Thomas Brightwell, B.S., M.S. A., Associate Horticulturist (Tifton, 
Georgia). 

Ruth Tuck Broach, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Associate Home Economist — Food 
Preservation (Extension). 

Carl William Brockseker, Research Assistant in Agricultural Engineering. 
U.S.D.A. 

Dvon Brogan, B.S.A., M.S. A., Assistant Horticulturist (Experiment, Georgia). 



**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 215 

♦Orien Leffrets Brooks, B.S., Associate Agronomist (Blairsville, Georgia). 

**Acton Richard Brown, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agron- 
omy. 

**Robert Henry Brown, B.S.E.E., B.S.A.E., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of 
Agricultural Engineering. 

Walter Scott Brown, B.S.A., Professor in Extension Service and Associate 
Director of the Agricultural Extension Service. 

Edmund Broadus Browne. B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Plant Breeding and 
Resident Director of the College Experiment Station. 

William Mercer Bruce, B.S.A.E., Research Associate in Agricultural Engi- 
neering and Agricultural Engineer, U.S.D.A. 

♦Charles James Bryant, B.S.A., Associate Agricultural Economist (Extens- 
sion). 

James Garlin Bryant, B.S.A., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Edu- 
cation. 

Robert Emmett Burns, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Plant Physiologist (Experiment, 
Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

Glenn Willard Burton, B.S.A., M.A., Ph.D., Principal Geneticist and Chair- 
man of the Division of Agronomy (Tifton, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

James Lee Butler, B.S., M.S., Assistant Agricultural Engineer (Experiment, 
Georgia). 

William Marion Carlton, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Joseph Pledger Carmichael, A.B.J., Associate Editor (Extension). 

James Lavern Carmon, B.S.A,. M.S., Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 

John Russell Carreker, B.S., M.S., Research Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering and Agricultural Engineer, Soil Conservation Service, U.S.D.A. 

Robert Leonidas Carter, B.S.C., M.S., Soil Scientist (Tifton, Georgia). 

William Clifton Carter, B.S.A. , Associate Agricultural Economist (Exten- 
sion). 

Samuel Reber Cecil, B.S., Associate Food Technologist (Experiment, Geor- 
gia). 

Sidney Grigsby Chandler, B.S.A., District Agent (Extension). 

Paul Wilber Chapman, B.S.A., B.S.Ed., M.S.A., Sc.D., Professor of Agricul- 
ture and Associate Dean of Instruction of the College of Agriculture. 

Walter Lonnie Chapman, B.S.F., Assistant Forester (Extension) , (Tifton, 
Georgia). 

Thomas Milburn Clyburn. B.S.A., Assistant Animal Husbandman (Tifton, 
Georgia). 



*On leave. 

'Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



216 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

•♦Carlisle Cobb, Jr., A.B., B.S.A.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

Kate McKinley Cobb, Illustrator (Extension) . 

Howard Templeton Coggin, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemis- 
try and Adviser to Pre-Medical Students. 

Lurline Collier, B.S.H.E., State Home Demonstration Agent and Chairman 
of the Division of Home Economics (Extension) . 

♦♦William Olin Collins, B.S.A., Professor of Agronomy and Head of the De- 
partment of Agronomy. 

Otis Bryant Copeland, B.S.A., Editor (Extension) . 

Fred Frazier Cowart, B.S., Ph.D., Horticulturist and Resident Director of the 
Georgia Experiment Station (Experiment, Georgia). 

♦Julian Pryor Craigmiles, B.S., M.S., Associate Agronomist (Experiment, 
Georgia). 

Paul Augustus Crawford, Jr., B.S.A.E., Assistant Agricultural Engineer (Ex- 
tension). 

♦♦Otis Everett Cross, B.S.A.E., M.S.A.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering 

Loy Van Crowder, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Pasture Specialist (Experiment, 
Georgia). 

♦♦Arthur Edison Cullison, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry, 
Head of the Department of Animal Husbandry, and Chairman of the Di- 
vision of Animal Husbandry. 

•♦Lawrence Cowlen Curtis, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture. 

Walter Newman Danner, Jr., B.S.A.E., M.S.A., Professor of Agricultural En- 
gineering, Registrar, and Director of Admissions. 

Arthur Franklin Darden, B.S.C., Assistant Agricultural Economist (Exten- 
sion). 

♦Forest Neal Davenport, B.S.A., Assistant Dairyman and Creamery Superin- 
tendent. 

Uriah Harold Davenport, B.S., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Engineer- 
ing. 

James Franklin Deal, B.S.A., Assistant Dairyman and Dairy Farm Manager. 

Earl Hoyt DeVane, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Agronomist (Tifton, Georgia), 
U.S.D.A. 

Lee Bryan DeYoung, B.S., Technical Assistant to the Coordinator, Regional 
Primary Plant Introduction Station (Experiment, Georgia). 

Willie Vie Dowdy, B.S.H.E., Home Economist — Home Improvement (Exten- 
sion). 

*On leave. 
**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 217 

Alice Gorton Drake, B.S.H.E., District Agent (Extension). 

♦♦Leland Overby Drew, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor of Agrciultural Engi- 
neering. 

**Ru»olph Henry Driftmier. B.S.A.E., M.S., A.E., Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering, Head of the Department of Agricultural Engineering, and 
Chairman of the Division of Agricultural Engineering. 

♦♦♦Thomas Glenn Dulin, A.B., Assistant Chemist (Experiment, Georgia). 

Amon Ocyrus Duncan, B.S.A., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of Agricultural 
Education. 

♦Talmadge Edward Duncan, B.S.A.E., Agricultural Engineer (Experiment, 
Georgia). 

Wilbur Howard Duncan, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

James Elton Dunn, B.S.A., Temporary Part-time Instructor in Agricultural 
Education. 

Linton Reese Dunson, B.S.A., Assistant State k-H Club Leader (Extension). 

Minter DuPree, Assistant Entomologist (Experiment, Georgia). 

Weldon Ellis DuPree, Assistant Food Technologist (Experiment, Georgia). 

Clarence Dorsey Dyer, B.S.F., Associate Forester (Extension) (Tifton, Geor- 
gia). 

**Irwin Allen Dyer, B.S.A., M.S. A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal 
Husbandry. 

Charles Broughton Earnest, B.S.A., Assistant Nutritionist (Extension). 

Linton Webster Eberhardt, B.S.F., District Agent (Extension). 

John Charles Elrod, B.A., M.S., Associate Agricultural Economist (Experi- 
ment, Georgia). 

Julius Mitchell Elrod, B.S., M.S., Associate Agronomist (Experiment, Geor- 
gia). 

John William Fanning, B.S.A., M.S.A., Extension Economist and Chairman 
of the Division of Agricultural Economics. 

Lloyd Edward Farmer, B.S.A., Agricultural Economist (Extension). 

George Henry Firor, B.S.A., Horticulturist (Extension). 

John William Firor, B.S., M.S. A., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. 

Frank Williams Fitch, B.S.A., Dairyman (Extension). 

**Attie Anderson Fleming, B.S.Ag.Ed., M.S.A.. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Plant Pathology. 

♦Kenneth Eldo Ford. B.S., M.S., Associate Agricultural Economist (Experi- 
ment, Georgia). 



•On leave. 
**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 
•••Died August 16. 1951. 



218 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

♦James Fletcher Forehand, B.S.A.E., Assistant Agricultural Engineer (Ex- 
tension). 

Wayne Henry Freeman, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Agronomist (Tifton, Georgia), 
U.8.D.A. 

Byard Owens Fry, B.S., Associate Horticulturist (Experiment, Georgia). 

Henry Lester Fuller, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Poultry Hus- 
bandry and Associate Poultry Husbandman, Branch Experiment Station. 

William Thomas Fullilove, B.S.A., Agricultural Economist and Head of the 
Department of Agricultural Economics (Experiment, Georgia). 

John Gordon Futral, B.S., Associate Agricultural Engineer and Head of the 
Department of Agricultural Engineering. (Experiment, Georgia). 

John Gordon Gaines, B.S., M.S., Plant Pathologist (Tifton, Georgia), U.8.D.A. 

Arthur Francis Gannon, B.S.A., M.S., Poultryman (Extension). 

Charles Gordon Garner, B.S.A., M.S.A., Agricultural Economist (Extension). 

Warren Edwin Garner, B.S.A.E., Research Assistant Professor of Agricul- 
tural Engineering. 

Edmond Joseph Gibson, B.S., Associate Pathologist and Superintendent, Shade 
Tobacco Station (Attapulgus, Georgia). 

Joel Edwin Giddens, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Assistant Soil Scientist and Di- 
rector of Soil Testing Service. 

Denzell Leigh Gill, B.S.A., Ph.D., Horticulturist (Tifton, Georgia). U.S.D.A. 

John Howard Girardeau, Jr., B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Apiculturist (Tifton, 
Georgia). 

Robert L. Givens, B.S.A.E., M.S., Research Associate in Agricultural Engi- 
neering and Agricultural Engineer, U.S.D.A. 

Ulys Roy Gore, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Agronomist (Experiment, Georgia). 

Edward Scott Hagood, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Plant Physiologist (Experiment, 
Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

Lowell Keith Halls, A.B. M,.S., Range Conservationist (Tifton, Georgia), 
U.S.D.A. 

John Robert Hamilton, B.S.F., M.S.F., Associate Forester (Experiment, 
Georgia). 

Silas Albert Harmon, B.S., Associate Horticulturist (Tifton, Georgia). 

Harold Jones Harpe, B.S.A., Temporary Part-time Instructor in Agricultural 
Education. 

Walton William Harper, B.S., M.S., Associate Agricultural Economist (Ex- 
periment, Georgia). 

Haskell Byard Harris, B.S., M.S., Assistant Agronomist (Experiment, Geor- 
gia). 



•On leave. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 219 

•John Thomas Harris, B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist (Experi- 
ment, Georgia). 

Roland Russell Harris, B.S.A., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Engineering. 

Martha Roberts Harrison, B.S.H.E., Associate State l^H Club Leader. {Ex- 
tension). 

Barney Stewart Hawkins, B.S., M.S., Assistant Agronomist (Experiment, 
Georgia), U.8.D.A. 

Dean Dillard Hayes, B.S.A., Superintendent of Branch Experiment Station 
(Calhoun, Georgia). 

George Edwin Henderson. B.S.A., Professor of Agricultural Engineering and 
Coordinator of the Southern Association of Agricultural Engineering and 
Vocational Agricultural Educators. 

•♦Herbert Blair Henderson, B.S., M.S., Professor of Dairy. Head of the Dairy 
Department, and Chairman of the Dairy Division. 

Bertram Hegbie Hendrickson, B.S., Project Supervisor, Southern Piedmont 
Conservation Experiment Station ( Watkinsville, Georgia). 

Guider Foreman Henry, B.S.A., M.S. A., Agronomy Farm Manager. 

Opie C. Hester. B.S., M.S., Agricultural Economist. U.S.D.A. 

Lucms Alice Higginbotham. B.S.H.E., Assistant Home Economist — Clothing 
(Extension) . 

Bascombe Britt Higgins. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Plant Pathologist and Head of 
the Department of Botany (Experiment, Georgia). 

Kirk Theron Holley, B.S., Chemist and Head of the Department of Chemis- 
try (Experiment, Georgia). 

Willl\m Eugene Hudson, B.S.A.E.. M.S.A.E., Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

♦Till Monroe Huston, B.S.A., M.S. A., Assistant Professor of Poultry Hus- 
bandry. 

Willis Earl Huston. B.S.A.E., M.S., Assistant Agricultural Engineer (Exten- 
sion) . 

Hugh Alexander Inc.lis. B.S.A.. M.S. A.. Associate Agronomist — Seed Certifi- 
cation (Extension) . 

Donald Leroy Jacobs. A.B., M.S., Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Edwin James. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Coordinator. Regional Primary Plant Intro- 
duction Station (Experiment. Georgia). 

Milton Preston Jarnagin. B.S.. M.Ag.. Sc.D.. Animal Husbandman (Exten- 
sion). 

J. G. Jenkins. Agronomist (Tifton, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

Glenn Irvin Johnson, B.S.A.E.. Agricultural Engineer (Extension). 



•♦Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



220 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

John Ralph Johnson, B.S., Assistant Agronomist (Extension). 

Joseph Calvert Johnson. Jr., B.S., M.S., Assistant Dairy Husbandman (Tif- 
ton, Georgia). 

♦♦Francis Elliott Johnstone, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Horticul- 
ture, Head of the Department of Horticulture, and Chairman of the Di- 
vision of Horticulture. 

David Jefferson Jones, Agricultural Aid (Tifton, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

♦Garrett Jones, B.S.A., Assistant Dairy Husbandman (Tifton, Georgia). 

Len Stuckey Jones, B.S., Assistant Soil Chemist (Experiment, Georgia). 

Rufus LaFayette Keener, B.S.A., M.S.A., Professor of Horticulture. 

♦♦Drayton Tucker Kinard, B.S.A.E., M.S.A.E., Associate Professor of Agri- 
cultural Engineering. 

Frank Pickett King, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Agricultural Economist and Resi- 
dent Director of the Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station. (Tifton, 
Georgia). 

George Harris King, B.S.A., M.S.A., Research Professor of Agriculture and 
Associate Director of Experiment Stations. 

William Anson King, B.S.A., Associate Agricultural Economist (Extension) . 

Franklin Ezra Knox, A.B., Biochemist (Tifton, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

George Miloslav Kozelnicky, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Plant Pathologist. 

Delmon William LaHue, B.S., M.S., Entomologist (Tifton, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

William Bryan Land, B.S.A.E., B.S.M.E., Research Assistant in Agricultural 
Engineering and Agricultural Engineer, Soil Conservation Service, 
U.S.D.A. 

Katherine Dreese Lanier, B.S.H.E., Home Economist — Food Preservation 
(Extension) . 

Lonnie Richard Lanier, B.S.A., District Agent (Extension) . 

Gabriel Anton Lebedeff, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Agronomist (Experiment, Geor- 
gia). 

Mildred Pierce Ledford, B.S.Ed., M.A., Assistant Home Economist — Home In- 
dustries (Extension). 

Horace Odin Lund, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Entomology and Chairman 
of the Department of Biology. 

Everett Stanley Luttrell, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist 
(Experiment, Georgia). 

Martha Irvine McAlpine, A.B., Home Economist — Child Development and 
Parent Education (Extension). 

William Conner McCormick, B.S.A., M.S.A., Associate Animal Husbandman 
(Tifton, Georgia). 



•On leave. 

**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 221 

Roy Julian McCraney, B.S.A.E., Research Assistant in Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

Marshall Edward McCullough, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Dairy Husband- 
man (Experiment, Georgia). 

John Edwin McGowan, B.S.A., Assistant Dairyman (Extension). 

Thomas Hubbard McHatton, B.S., M.Hort., D.Sc, Professor Emeritus of 
Horticulture. 

William Hardy McKinney, B.S.A., Assistant Animal Husbandman (Blairs- 
ville, Georgia). 

Thomas Leverett McMullan, B.S.A., Administrative Assistant (Extension) . 

Neal Duncan McRainey, B.S.A., Superintendent of Branch Experiment Sta- 
tion (Americus, Georgia). 

John Henry Machmer, A.B., Associate Nematologist (Tifton, Georgia), 
U.S.D.A. 

James Nelson Maddux, B.S., M.S., Assistant Animal Husbandman (Tifton, 
Georgia). 

Warren Harding Marchant, B.S.A., Assistant Agronomist (Tifton, Georgia). 

John Hubert Massey, B.S., M.S., Soil Technician (Blairsville, Georgia). 

Susan Josephine Mathews, A.B., B.S., M.A., Home Economist — Nutrition 
(Extension) . 

John Frank Mauldin, B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist (Extension) . 

Helen Virginia Michaelis, A.B., A.B.L.S., Assistant Professor and South 
Branch Librarian. 

**Julian Howell Miller, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., Regents' Professor of Plant 
Pathology and Plant Breeding, Head of the Department of Plant Path- 
ology and Plant Breeding, and Chairman of the Division of Plant Path- 
ology. 

♦Russell Lee Miller, B.S.A., Temporary Instructor in Agronomy. 

Sara Josephine Miller, B.S., Assistant Home Economist (Experiment, Geor- 
gia). 

Lionel Woodrow Mills, B.S.A., Temporary Instructor in Food Technology. 

William Grant Mitchell, Jr., A.B., Assistant Editor (Experiment, Georgia). 

Audrey Matilda Morgan, B.S., District Agent (Extension) . 

Loy Weston Morgan, B.S., M.S., Assistant Entomologist (Tifton, Georgia). 

**Harold Donald Morris, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

** Spencer Horton Morrison, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dairy. 

Matthew McIlhenny Murphy, Assistant Horticulturist (Experiment, Geor- 
gia). 



•♦Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



222 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Calvin Clyde Murray, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy, Dean of the 
College of Agriculture, and Director of the Experiment Stations and Ex- 
tension Service. 

Ivan Neas, B.S., M.S., Agronomist (Tifton, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

Walter Edward Neville, Jr.. B.S.A., M.S., Assistant Animal Husbaridman 
(Experiment, Georgia). 

Walter Edward Neville, Sr., Apiculturist (Extension). 

Clifford Newell Nolan, B.S.A., Soil Technician (Tifton, Georgia). 

Willimenta Norris, B.S.H.E., Technician, Department of Food Technology. 

George Ligon O'Kelley, Jr., B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Agricultural Education. 

Edna Howard Olson, B.S., Librarian (Experiment, Georgia). 

Lawrence Carroll Olson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Soil Chemist (Experiment, Geor- 
gia). 

♦♦Hubert Bond Owens, B.S.A., M.A., Professor of Landscape Architecture, 
Head of the Department of Landscape Architecture, Chairman of the Di- 
vision of Landscape Architecture, and Director of the Founders Memorial 
Garden. 

Stith Anderson Parham, B.S.A., Agronomist and Head of the Department 
of Agronomy (Tifton, Georgia). 

Edward Milton Parker, B.S., M.S., Assistant Pasture Specialist (Experiment, 
Georgia). 

Myron Bart Parker, B.S., Assistant Agronomist (Blairsville, Georgia). 

Sammie Bell Parkman, B.S.A., M.S., Assistant Agronomist (Tifton, Georgia) 

Joseph John Paul, Ph.B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Elinor Pearson, B.S., M.S., Associate Home Economist (Experiment, Geor- 
gia). 

Newton Mack Penny, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Agricultural Economist (Experi- 
ment, Georgia). 

Henry Frank Perkins, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Agronomist {Soil Testing 
Service). 

Thomas Austin Pickett, B.S., M.S., Associate Chemist (Experiment, Geor- 
gia). 

♦♦John Joseph Powers, B.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Food Technology 
and Acting Head of the Department of Food Technology. 

John Preston, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Agronomist (Extension) (Tifton, 
Georgia). 

♦*Roy Estes Proctor, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics and Acting Head of the Department of Agricultural Economics. 
Elmo Ragsdale, B.S.A., Horticulturist (Extension). 



**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 223 

Harvey Walter Rankin, B.S.A., M.S.A., Plant Pathologist (Tifton, Georgia). 

Bernard Michael Reges, B.S., Biological Aid (Experiment, Georgia), U.8.D.A. 

Charles Erskine Rice, B.S.A.E., M.S., Assistant Agricultural Engineer (Tif- 
ton, Georgia). 

Albert Gold win George Richardson, Professor Emeritus of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

Joel Condor Richardson, B.S.A., District Agent (Extension). 

Robert James Richardson, B.S.A., Associate State l r H Club Leader. (Exten- 
sion). 

Alfred Ernest Ritchie, B.S., M.S., Assistant Chemist (Experiment, Georgia). 

Frank Telford Ritchie, B.S., State Soil Scientist, Soil Conservation Service, 
U.S.D.A. 

Burett Presley Robinson, B.S., M.S., Turf Specialist (Tifton, Georgia). 
Paul Dean Rogers, A.B., B.S., M.E., M.S.A.E., Associate Agricultural Engi- 
neer. 

Eddye Belle Ross, B.S.H.E., District Agent (Extension) . 

**Waldo Swinton Rowan, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Economics. 

Rachael Joyce Rutherford, B.S., M.S., Research Assistant, Home Economics. 

Fred Bradley Saunders, B.S.A., M.S.A., Instructor in Agricultural Economics. 

Earl Frederick Savage, B.S.. Ph.D., Horticulturist and Head of the Depart- 
ment of Horticulture (Experiment, Georgia). 

Alfred Witherspoon Scott, B.S., Ph.D., Terrell Professor of Chemistry, Head 
of the Department of Chemistry, Chairman of the Division of Physical 
Sciences, and Faculty Chairman of Athletics. 

Otto Edwin Sell, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Pasture Specialist and Head of the De- 
partment of Animal Industry (Experiment, Georgia). 

James Halle Shands, B.S., Assistant Pasture Specialist (Experiment, Geor- 
gia). 

Elbert Thedric Shellhorse, B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist (Ex- 
tension). 

Ethyl Shelor, B.S.H.E., Assistant Food Technologist (Experiment, Georgia). 

♦James Livingston Shepherd, B.S.M.E., B.S.A.E., Agricultural Engineer (Tif- 
ton, Georgia). 

**John Joseph Sheuring, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Dairy. 
Sara Weaver Siewert, B.S.H.E., Assistant Food Technologist (Experiment, 
Georgia). 

**Joseph Winslow Simons, B.S.A.E., M.S.A.E., Research Professor of Agri- 
cultural Engineering and Agricultural Engineer, U.S.D.A. 



*On leave. 
**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



224 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

William Lawrence Sippel, B.S., M.S., D.V.M., Animal Pathologist, Head of 
the Department of Animal Diseases, and Chairman of the Division of 
Animal Diseases (Tifton, Georgia). 

Louis Ibvin Skinneb, B.S.A., Professor in Extension Service and Assistant 
Director (Extension). 

Jesse Sidney Sloan, D.V.M., Assista?it Veterinarian (Tifton, Georgia). 

James Aubrey Smith, Assistant Editor — Visual Education (Extension) . 

Lloyd Leboy Smith, B.S.A.E., Research Associate in Agricultural Engineer- 
ing and Agricultural Engineer, U.S.D.A. 

Pebby Maxwell Smith, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant to the Coordinator, Regional 
Primary Plant Introduction Station (Experiment, Georgia). 

Richabd E. Smith, B.S.Ed., Administrative Assistant (Extension) . 

Thomas Hudson Smith, B.S., M.Ed., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Bybon Lesteb Southwell, B.S.A., M.S.A., Animal Husbandman and Head of 
the Department of Animal Husbandry (Tifton, Georgia ),U.S.D. A. 

Melba Inez Spabks, B.S.H.E., District Agent (Extension) . 

Geobge Nobth Spabbow, B.S.C.E., Project Supervisor and Research Associate 
in Agricultural Engineering (Tifton, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

Stephen Johnson Speck, B.S., M.S., Assistant Dairyman and Acting Superin- 
tendent of the Creamery. 

Maby Speibs, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Home Economist and Head of the Department 
of Home Economics (Experiment, Georgia). 

Garth Hibam Spitler, B.S., Assistant Entomologist (Tifton, Georgia), 
U.S.D.A. 

Samuel Vaude Stacy, B.S., M.S., Agronomist and Head of the Department of 
Agronomy (Experiment, Georgia). 

William Edwabd Stallings, Plant Manager of the Poultry Plant and Super- 
visor of the Georgia National Egg haying Contest. 

Oscab Steanson, B.S., M.S., Associate Agricultural Economist (Experiment, 
Georgia). 

**Matthias Stelly, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy. 

James Louis Stephens, B.S.A., M.S.A., Se?iior Agronomist (Tifton, Georgia), 
U.S.D.A. 

Ronald David Stephens, B.S.A., Associate Editor — Radio (Extension). 

***Henby Perkins Stuckey, B.S., Sc.D., Director Emeritus (Experiment, 
Georgia). 

Reynolds Foy Suman, B.S., Range Conservationist (Tifton, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

Stella Caudill Sutton, B.S., Librarian (Tifton, Georgia). 

William Abneb Sutton, B.S.A., State 4-H Club Leader (Extension). 

**Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 
***Died June 14, 1951. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 225 

Jack Taylor, B.S.A., M.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist (Blairsville, Georgia). 

Richard Bonnell Taylor, A.B., B.S., Assistant Professor of Landscape Archi- 
tecture. 

Ernest Henry Thomas, B.S.A., Associate Agronomist (Extension). 

John Henry Thomason, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

**George Edward Thompson, B.S.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Plant Path- 
ology and Plant Breeding. 

Jack Thomas Thompson, B.S., Assistant Agronomist (Experiment, Georgia). 

Ralph Harmon Tolbert, A.B., B.S.A,. M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of Agri- 
cultural Education and Acting Chairman of the Division of Vocational 
Education. 

Kenneth Treanor, B.S.A. , Branch Station Superintendent (Midville, Geor- 
gia). 

Charles Eugene Turner, B.F.A., Instructor in Agricultural Engineering and 
Illustrator, Southern Association of Agricultural Engineering and Voca- 
tional Agricultural Educators. 

*John Hancock Turner. Jr., B.S.A., Agronomist (Tifton, Georgia). 

Harry G. Ukkelberg, B.S.A., M.S., Associate Horticulturist (Tifton, Geor- 
gia). 

Frank Van Haltekx, B.S., M.S., Associate Plant Pathologist (Experiment, 
Georgia). 

Martin Luther Van Winkle. Ph.B., B.S.A., M.S., Associate Recreationist, 
(Extension) . 

Halsey Hugh Vegors, A.B., Parasitologist (Experiment, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

John Couse Walters, Scientific Aid (Tifton, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

Thomas Laurice Walton, Jr., B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist (Ex- 
tension). 

♦♦Edward Perrin Warren, B.S.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Animal 
Husbandry. 

Luke Stephens Watson. B.S.A., District Agent (Extension). 

♦Ralph Lee Wehunt, B.S.A., M.S.A., Research Assistant Agronomist. 

James Leroy Weimer, A.B., Ph.D., Senior Plant Pathologist (Experiment, 
Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

Branson Edwin Welborn, B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist (Exten- 
sion). 

Harmon Keener Welch, Jr., B.S.A., Assistant Dairyman (Extension). 
Edison Collins Westbrook, B.S.A., M.S.A., Agronomist (Extension). 
Lloyd Claiborne Westbrook, B.S.A., District Agent (Extension). 



♦On leave. 
'♦Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



226 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Jonathan Jackson Westfall, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Botany and 
Head of the Department of Botany. 

Mary Lou Whatley, B.S., Assistant Home Economist (Experiment, Georgia). 

Lee Roy Wheelee, Agricultural Aid (Tifton, Georgia), U.S.D.A. 

♦♦Robert Stevenson Wheeler, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry, 
Head of the Department of Poultry Husbandry, and Chairman of the 
Poultry Division. 

♦♦Harold Douglas White, B.S.A.E., M.S., Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

Harry Alton White, B.S., M.S., Cooperative Agent — Farm Management {Ex- 
tension), U.S.D.A. 

Brooks Edward Wigginton, A.B., B.F.A., M.L.A., F.A.A.R., Professor of Land- 
scape Architecture. 

Cecil Norton Wilder, B.S.A., M.S.A., Associate Professor of Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

Ralph Otto Williams. B.S., Assistant Animal Husbandman (Extension) 
(Tifton, Georgia). 

Thomas Griffith Williams, Jr., B.F.A.. Assistant Landscape Architect (Ex- 
tension). 

Charles Christopher Wilson. B.S., M.A., Ph. D., Associate Professor of Bot- 
any. 

♦Howard Henry Woeber, B.S., M.S., Associate Chemist (Experiment, Georgia). 

Otis Woodard, B.S.A., Horticulturist and Head of the Department of Horti- 
culture (Tifton, Georgia). 

Jasper Guy Woodroof, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Food Technologist, Head of the 
Department of Food Technology, and Chairman of the Division of Food 
Technology (Experiment, Georgia). 

William Davis Woodward, B.S.A., M.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist, (Tifton, 
Georgia). 

Howard B. Young., B.S.A., Part-time Acting Assistant Superintendent of the 
Creamery. 

Ann Elizabeth Zellner, B.S.H.E., Assistant State 4-H Club Leader (Exten- 
sion). 



Omer Clyde Aderhold, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., President of the University. 
Alvin Blocksom Biscoe. A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of Faculties. 



Joseph Thomas Askew. Ph.B., M.A., LL.D., Dean of Student Affairs. 
Walter Newman Danner, Jr., B.S.A.E., M.S.A., Registrar and Director of 

Admissions. 
John Dixon Bolton, C.P.A., Comptroller and Treasurer. 



'On leave. 

'Also on College Experiment Station Staff. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 227 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Each state has one institution of higher learning known as a Land- 
Grant College or University which is approved by officials of the Federal 
Government for giving college instruction in agriculture and related fields. 
In Georgia that institution is the University of Georgia, of which the Col- 
lege of Agriculture is an integral part. 

The University of Georgia is a member of the American Association of 
Land-Grant Colleges and Universities. It has been approved by the United 
States Commissioner of Education for giving college instruction in agri- 
culture and agricultural engineering. The University receives grants from 
the Federal Government to aid in financing its educational program in 
these fields. It is officially recognized and approved by the United States 
Department of Agriculture and other agencies of the Federal Government 
concerned with farming and related occupations. 

The College of Agriculture provides a coordinated and integrated program 
of research, college teaching, and extension services. It embraces the agri- 
cultural experiment stations and the Agricultural Extension Service. Re- 
sponsibility for administration is vested in the Dean and Director, who is 
responsible to the President of the University. Under the Dean and Director 
there are three associates, as follows: an associate dean in charge of instruc- 
tion; an associate director in charge of extension work; an associate director 
in charge of experiment stations. At each of the experiment stations, includ- 
ing Athens, Experiment, and Tifton. there is a resident director in charge. 

In the College of Agriculture there are thirteen subject matter fields or 
divisions, each of which embraces research, teaching, and extension, and 
each of which is in charge of a chairman. These divisions are: agronomy, 
agricultural economics, animal diseases, agricultural engineering, animal 
husbandry, dairy, entomology, food processing, home economics, horticulture, 
landscape architecture, plant pathology, poultry husbandry. In addition, 
there are several schools and colleges with which relationships have been 
established for conducting programs including teaching, research, and ex- 
tension services; these include fields such as botany, chemistry, education, 
entomology, forestry, home economics, and veterinary medicine. 

COURSES AND DEGREES 

The College of Agriculture offers degree courses in agriculture, agricul- 
tural engineering, and landscape architecture. It is also recommended that 
students seeking admission to the School of Veterinary Medicine register in 
the College of Agriculture while enrolled in the pre-veterinary program. 

Upon completion of the twelve-quarter course outlined, students registered 
in agriculture may receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, 
and students in agricultural engineering, the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Agricultural Engineering. 

Graduate work is offered in both agriculture and agricultural engineer- 
ing. Master's degrees — Master of Science in Agriculture and Master of 
Science in Agricultural Engineering — normally require three quarters in 
residence after requirements for the bachelor's degree have been completed. 
Also, there is offered the degree Master of Agriculture. This professional 
degree, more varied in scope than the Master of Science in Agriculture, is 
designed to meet the needs of persons engaged in such general agricultural 
pursuits as teacher of agriculture in the public schools, county agent, and 
workers in other agricultural agencies. Not being a research degree, no thesis 
as such is required. However, a report, survey or paper may be required in 
a course listed "921. Problems en Agriculture.'' Minimum requirements in- 
clude 60 hours' credit and four quarters in residence. 

Students wishing to prepare themselves for the business of farming but 
having no desire to secure a degree will be awarded a Certificate of At- 



228 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

tainment upon completion of the work outlined for the first six quarters. 
The course has been planned with this objective in mind. 

Many short courses of a practical and intensive nature are offered by 
the College of Agriculture. Announcements of these courses will be made 
throughout the year. Any course will be offered for which there is sufficient 
demand. A citizen of Georgia desiring to take any such course should write 
to the Dean of the College of Agriculture, indicating the field or problem 
in which instruction is desired. 

The Department of Landscape Architecture, a department in the College 
of Agriculture, offers two degree courses: one, the professional degree B.L.A. 
— Bachelor of Landscape Architecture; the other, B.S.L.A. — Bachelor of 
Science in Landscape Architecture. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR VETERINARY MEDICINE 

In order to matriculate in the School of Veterinary Medicine, a student 
must present a minimum of 90 quarter hours' credit, exclusive of Basic 
Military and Physical Education, with a grade of C or better. 

To meet these requirements, a student may register in the College of Agri- 
culture and take the following courses: 

English 2x-2y English 6 

Chemistry 21-22 Physics 20 

Mathematics lOlx and lOly Dairy 3 

Botany 21-22 Zoology 25 and 26 

Animal Husbandry 1 Political Science 1 

Poultry Husbandry 60 Organic Chemistry 346 and 347h 

Basic Military or Air (First Year) (Chemistry 347h is a definite re- 

Electives: quirement.) 

Agricultural Economics 4 Basic Military or Air (Second 

Agronomy 1 and 10 Year) 
Horticulture 1 

All candidates for admission into the entering class in September each 
year will be required to take during the preceding May or June a veterinary 
medical aptitude test. The results of this test will become a part of the stu- 
dent's credentials for admittance into the School of Veterinary Medicine. 

Recently, the School of Veterinary Medicine has had many more applicants 
than the maximum number of 57 accepted each year; consequently, any stu- 
dent who is registered in the College of Agriculture may, upon completion 
of pre-veterinary requirements, continue with the agricultural curriculum, 
should he fail to gain admittance to the School of Veterinary Medicine. Such 
students will be able to apply all credits earned to requirements for the 
B.S.A. degree. Chemistry 346 may be offered as one of the science selections; 
or, Chemistry 346 and 347h will constitute a minor; or Zoology 25 and 26 and 
Chemistry 347h will be accepted as electives in most divisions of the College 
of Agriculture. 

B.S.A. DEGREE IN CONJUNCTION WITH D.V.M. DEGREE 

A student in the School of Veterinary Medicine may, in conjunction with 
his work toward the D.V.M. degree, complete the requirements for a B.S. 
degree in Agriculture, by taking from three to four quarters of additional 
work prior to, during, and/or subsequent to his work in Veterinary Medi- 
cine, the amount of extra work depending on the department of his major. 
A major in the Departments of Animal Husbandry, Dairy, or Poultry Hus- 
bandry would require the least amount of extra course work on the part of 
the student. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 229 

AGRICULTURAL CURRICULUM 

The curriculum in agriculture for the freshman and sophomore years is 
definitely outlined. It is required of all students seeking the B.S.A. degree. 
In the freshman year 54 quarter hours of credit are required in specific 
subjects. In the sophomore year 52 quarter hours of credit are required. 
These courses are listed below. 

Specialization begins in the third or junior year. Before the close of the 
second year, each student should select the department in which he wishes 
to major. In some instances he must also select the special concentration 
for which he wishes to register. Then he should prepare a program of study 
to be approved by the head of the department in which the student intends 
to major. 

Students in the College of Agriculture working for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Agriculture may major in the following departments: (1) Agri- 
cultural Chemistry; (2) Agricultural Economics; (3) Agricultural Exten- 
sion; (4) Agronomy, including soils; (5) Animal Husbandry; (6) Botany; 
(7) Dairy; (8) Entomology; (9) Food Technology; (10) General Agricul- 
ture; (11) Horticulture; (12) Plant Pathology; (13) Poultry Husbandry; 
and (14) Vocational Education. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

Freshman 

Hours 

Agricultural Economics 4 (Farm Records & Computations) .__ 5 

Animal Husbandry 1 (Introductory Animal Husbandry) 3 

Botany 21-22 (Elementary Botany) 10 

Chemistry 21-22 (Inorganic) 10 

Dairy 3 (Elements of Dairying) 3 

English 2 x-y (Composition) 10 

Forestry 2 (Farm Forestry) 3 

Poultry Husbandry 60 (Poultry Biology and Production) 5 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 (Military or Air Science and Tactics)—. 5 
Physical Education 1 

Total 54 

Sophomore 

Hours 

Agricultural Economics 10 (Rural Economics) 3 

Agricultural Engineering 20 (Soil and Water Conservation) 3 

Agricultural Engineering 61 (Agricultural Machines) or 

Agricultural Engineering 62 (Gas Engines and Tractors) 3 

Agricultural Engineering 70 (Farm Building and Equipment) or 

Agricultural Engineering 280 (Farm Electrification) 3 

Agronomy 1 (Field Crop Production) 5 

Agronomy 10 (Principles of Soil Management) - 5 

English 6 (Oral and Written Composition) 5 

Horticulture 1 (General Horticulture) 5 

Mathematics 101 x (College Algebra) or 

Mathematics 101 y (Trigonometry) 5 

Physics 20 (Physics Survey) _ 5 

Political Science 1 (American Government) 5 

Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 (Military or Air Science and Tactics)..- 5 

Physical Education 2 

Total 52 



230 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS 

Major 20 Hours 

In Agricultural Chemistry, Agricultural Economics, Agricul- 
tural Extension, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Botany, Dairy, 
Entomology, Food Technology, General Agriculture, Horticul- 
ture, Plant Pathology, Poultry, or Vocational Education. 

Science Selections 20 Hours 

From the following: Bacteriology 350, Chemistry 346, Eco- 
nomics 312, Mathematics 356, Plant Pathology 353, Plant Path- 
ology 358, Veterinary Medicine 200, Zoology 374. 

Minor 1 10 Hours 

May be in any one department of the University. 

Minor 2 10 Hours 

Must be in the College of Agriculture. 

Special Requirements — not more than 20 Hours 

General Electives — not less than 10 Hours 

Total Junior-Senior Requirements 90 Hours 

Total Freshman-Sophomore Requirements 96 Hours* 

Total Course Requirements 186 Hours* 

REQUIRED ARTS AND SCIENCE COURSES 

Approximately one-half the course requirements in the first two years are 
offered by the College of Agriculture; the remainder by the Armed Services 
Department. College of Education, School of Forestry, and the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Since the departments of Botany, Chemistry, and Ento- 
mology, which are units of the College of Arts and Sciences, are affiliated 
with the College of Agriculture, the courses offered by these departments, 
or those of interest to agricultural students, are listed in the bulletin of the 
College of Agriculture. Courses not so listed are as follows: 

Freshman 

2 x-y. (English) Composition. 10 hours (5 hours a quarter). Miss Du- 
mas and the Staff. 

First quarter: grammar, punctuation, mechanics, diction, and sentence structure. 
Second and third quarters: reading from English and American literature. Themes 
and parallel reading required throughout the course. Conferences on themes and read- 
ing. 

2. Farm Forestry. 3 hours. Mr. Grant and Mr. Weddell. 
A general course for agricultural and vocational agricultural students dealing with 
forestry from the farmer's standpoint. 

l(5)a-b-c. M^itary (Air) Science and Tactics. First year basic course in 
Cavalry and Infantry (Air) consists of three hours of classwork and two 
hours of drill and outdoor instruction. The course includes military organiza- 
tion; hygiene and first aid; leadership, drill, and exercises of command; indi- 
vidual weapons and marksmanship; maps and aerial photographs; and na- 
tional defense act and ROTC. 

1-2. Physical Education. No hours credit. (Includes both freshman and 
sophomore courses). 

Men. Three hours a week for six quarters. Stegeman Hall. Physical Edu- 
cation Staff. 

The physical fitness and swimming test will be given each quarter. Activities 
include touch-football, soccer, speedball, volleyball, swimming, badminton, tennis, 
golf, horseback riding, basketball, tumbling, apparatus, softball, track and field, 
and others. 



'Exclusive of the required courses Military 1-2 or Air 5-6, and Physical Education 1- 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 231 

Sophomore 

6. (English) Oral and Written Composition. Miss Dumas and the Staff. 
Required of students in agriculture, agricultural engineering, and distributive edu- 
cation. 

Mathematics. IOIx or lOly. 

lOlx. College Algebra. Prerequisite: At least two units of high school 
mathematics, including one year in algebra. Mr. Fort and the Staff. 

Review of some elementary algebra, quadratic equations, binomial theorem, pro- 
gressions, complex numbers, etc. 

lOly. Trigonometry. Prerequisite: same as IOIx. Mr. Fort and the Staff. 
Trigonometry through the right triangle, functions of the sum and difference of 
two angles, the oblique triangle, and the spherical right triangle. 

20. Physics Survey. Not open to students who have credit for Physical 
Science 1. The Staff. 

An elementary study of the fundamentals of physics with a study of some of 
the simpler applications of physics. The laboratory period of two hours a week 
will be devoted to measurements designed to give an introduction in laboratory 
methods. 

1. (Political Science) American Government. Mr. Pound and the Staff. 

An introductory course covering the essential facts of federal, state, and local 
governments in the United States. A satisfactory grade will exempt a student from 
the requirement of passing an examination on the Constitution of the United States 
and the Constitution of Georgia before graduation. 

2(6)a-b-c. Military (Air) Science and Tactics. Second year basic course 
in Cavalry and Infantry (Air) consists of three hours of classroom work and 
two hours of drill and outdoor instruction. The course includes leadership, 
drill, and exercise of command; physical development methods; maps and 
aerial photographs; military administration; evolution of warfare; and mili- 
tary law and boards. 

1-2. Physical Education. No hours credit. (See course outline under 
those listed for freshmen). 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SPECIALIZATION 

Concentrations offered by the departments of the College of Agriculture 
and related departments in which agricultural students may major, together 
with brief statements concerning the opportunities available in each field 
of specialization, are shown under appropriate departmental headings. 

The curriculum, given previously, outlines requirements for graduation 
and suggests departments in which students may specialize. 

During the first six quarters each student should give careful considera- 
tion to the field of work for which he wishes to prepare. The department 
in which he intends majoring should be selected not later than the last 
quarter of his sophomore year. The student should then consult the head 
of that department about his program of study for his junior and senior 
years. 

In order to acquaint students with the fields in which one may specialize, 
the opportunities in each, and the courses recommended by the several de- 
partments, the following concentration programs have been developed by 
the departments in which agricultural students may major during the junior 
and senior years. These are suggestive rather than definite requirements. The 
concentration for each student is an individual program, arranged in con- 
sultation with the members of the staff in the department in which the 
major is taken. In the main, however, the following programs, as presented 
by the several departments, include the courses which the majority of stu- 
dents will elect with the selection of the field of specialization. 

Unless otherwise indicated, all courses are offered in the College of Agri- 
culture buildings on the South Campus of the University. 



232 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The University reserves the right to withdraw any course for which the 
registration is not sufficient and to offer courses not here listed should 
sufficient demand arise and teaching facilities and personnel be available. 

Unless otherwise indicated all courses will meet five times a week and 
carry five hours' credit. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

(Conner Hall, South Campus) 

The Department of Agricultural Economics offers courses designed to 
train young men for jobs in agriculture or closely allied vocations. The 
principal objectives of this type of training are: 

(1) To prepare students for positions with the Federal and State de- 
partments of agriculture, and in the teaching, research, and agricultural 
extension divisions of land-grant colleges. 

These positions require specialized preparation in agricultural economics, 
agricultural credit, farm finance, land economics, agricultural adjustment, 
marketing farm products, farm management, and cooperation in agriculture. 

(2) To prepare students for entering business with private corporations 
in positions that require fundamental training in marketing, land use, farm 
credit, and other similar services connected with agriculture. 

(3) To prepare students for graduate work in agricultural economics 
and marketing farm products. 

Currently there is a strong demand for agricultural economists with post- 
graduate training. An expanding program of research in agricultural eco- 
nomics in the land-grant colleges and in the United States Department of 
Agriculture has opened more positions for such agricultural economists 
than could be filled. This has also increased the demand for teachers of 
agricultural economics. This demand has been especially strong for agri- 
cultural economists with graduate work in marketing. 

The following are examples of concentrations in agricultural economics, 
agricultural marketing, farm finance and agricultural prices, and farm or- 
ganization and management. These concentrations have been prepared in 
suggested outline to assist students in appraising their vocational poten- 
tialities in the field of agricultural economics; and to aid students who have 
selected agricultural economics as their major subject. 

A student exploring the subject of agricultural economics is advised to 
study these suggested concentrations and to read the descriptions of courses 
that may be included in his program. He should then consult the Head of 
the Department of Agricultural Economics. 

Each student must present a program of study to the professor designated 
by the Head of the Department of Agricultural Economics. This professor 
will be the student's adviser. A program of study in agricultural economics 
must be prepared and submitted during the last quarter of a student's sopho- 
more year unless he is a transfer student, when it must be submitted during 
his first quarter's attendance. 

CONCENTRATION IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Junior and Senior Years 

This concentration is suggested for those who desire a comprehensive 
knowledge and understanding of economics applied to agriculture and those 
who later on may formulate a more specialized program of study. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 23 3 



Major: 

Agricultural Economics 301 (Farm Organization and Manage- 
ment), Agricultural Economics 304 (Marketing Farm Pro- 
ducts), Agricultural Economics 351 (Agricultural Credit), 
Agricultural Economics 364 (Land Economics) 20 Hours 

Science selections same for all concentrations from the following: 
Bacteriology 350 (Introductory Bacteriology), Plant Pathol- 
ogy 353 (Elementary Plant Pathology), Veterinary Medicine 
200 (Common Diseases of Farm Animals), Plant Pathology 
358 (Principles of Breeding), Mathematics 356 (Statistics), 
Zoology 374 (Economic Entomology), Economics 312 (Ele- 
mextary Economic Statistics), Chemistry 346 (Elements 
of Organic Chemistry) „ 20 Hours 

First Minor: 

May be in any department of the University 10 Hours 

Second Minor: 

Must be in one department of the College of Agriculture 10 Hours 

General Electives _.. 10 Hours 

Special Electives: 

A selection of courses from the group of Special Electives. See 
list following details of concentrations in Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. Not more than six quarter hours in any one department 20 Hours 

CONCENTRATION IN AGRICULTURAL MARKETING 

Junior and Senior Years 

This concentration is recommended for those who intend to engage in 
marketing farm products or obtain professional positions in agricultural 
marketing. 

Major: 

Agricultural Economics 304 (Marketing Farm Products), Ag- 
ricultural Economics 400 (Cooperation in Agriculture), Agri- 
cultural Economics 403 (Marketing Livestock and Livestock 
Products), Agricultural Economics 404 (Marketing Field 
Crops and Horticultural Products) 20 Hours 

Science Selections (See Agricultural Economics Concentration) 20 Hours 

First Minor: 

May be in any one department in the University 10 Hours 

Second Minor: 

Must be in one department of College of Agriculture 10 Hours 

General Electives 10 Hours 

Special Electives: 

A selection of courses from the group of Special Electives. See 
list following details of concentrations in Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. Not more than six quarter hours in any one depart- 
ment 20 Hours 

Note: A student who selects this concentration should include Agricul- 
tural Economics 351 (Agricultural Credit) as an elective or it should be 
included in a Second Minor, unless after consultation icith major professor 
it is decided otherwise. 

A student ivho intends to do graduate work should include Economics 312 
(Elementary Economic Statistics). Agricultural Economics 458 (Princi- 
ples of Agricultural Economics) and 467 (Agricultural Prices) are recom- 
mended as electives or as a Second Minor. 



2 34 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

CONCENTRATION IN FARM FINANCE AND AGRICULTURAL PRICES 

Junior and Senior Years 

This concentration is suggested for those who intend to work with banks, 
finance departments of corporations and cooperative associations and as 
professional farm financial workers. 

Major: 

Agricultural Economics 301 (Farm Organization and Man- 
agement), Agricultural Economics 304 (Marketing Farm Pro- 
ducts), Agricultural Economics 351 (Agricultural Credit), 
Agricultural Economics 467 (Agricultural Prices) 20 Hours 

Science Selections (See Agricultural Economics Concentration) 20 Hours 

First Minor: 

May be in any one department in the University 10 Hours 

Second Minor: 

Must be in one department of the College of Agriculture 10 Hours 

General Electives 10 Hours 

Special Electives: 

A selection of courses from the group of Special Electives. 
See list following details of concentrations in Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. Not more than six quarter hours in any one depart- 
ment. 20 Hours 

CONCENTRATION IN FARM MANAGEMENT 

Junior and Senior Years 

This concentration is recommended for students who expect to become 
farm operators, farm managers, land appraisers or do other work involving 
plans for organization and management of farms. 

Major: 

Agricultural Economics 301 (Farm Organization and Man- 
agement), Agricultural Economics 402 (Advanced Farm Or- 
ganization and Management), Agricultural Economics 364 
(Land Economics), Agricultural Economics 351 (Agricul- 
tural Credit) 20 Hours 

Science Selections (See Agricultural Economics Concentration)... 20 Hours 
First Minor: 

May be from any department in the University 10 Hours 

Second Minor: 

Must be from one department of the College of Agriculture 10 Hours 

General Electives 10 Hours 

Special Electives: 

A selection of courses from the group of Special Electives. 

Not more than six quarter hours in any one department 20 Hours 

Note: It is recommended that the student in this concentration include 
Animal Husbandry 371 (Livestock Production), 373 (Feeds and Feeding), 
Agronomy 458 (Land Classification, Land Zoning, and Land Use Prob- 
lems), Business Administration 370 (Business Law), and Agricultural Eco- 
nomics 400 (Cooperation in Agriculture) or 458 (Principles of Agricul- 
tural Economics) unless, after consultation with his major professor, it is 
advisable to do otherwise. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 2_35 

GROUP OF SPECIAL ELECTIVES 

Agricultural Economics 400 (Cooperation in Agriculture), 401 (Farmer 
Movements), 470 (Current Agricultural Problems), 458 (Principles of 
Agricultural Economics), 467 (Agricultural Prices), 469 (Farm Fi- 
nance). 

Agricultural Engineering 61 (Agricultural Machines), 62 (Gas Engines 
and Tractors), 70 (Farm Buildings and Equipment), 203 (Farm Shop), 
205 (Elements of Refrigeration), 280 (Farm Electrification). 

Agronomy 300 (Commercial Cotton Classing), 320 (Southern Field Crops), 

361 (Soil Classification and Soil Survey), 355 (Advanced Soil Man- 
agement), 356 (Fertilizers). 

Animal Husbandry 350 (Types, Breeds, Classes and Grades of Livestock), 
371 (Livestock Production), 373 (Feeds and Feeding). 

Dairy 379 (Dairy Cattle Judging. Fitting, and Showing), 381 (Dairy Farm 
Operations), 385 (Dairy Products, Judging, and Grading), 394 (Market 
Milk), 395 (Dairy Plant Management). 

Food Technology 363 (Food Preservation), 364 (Freezer Locker Operations 
and Management), 365 (Meat Cutting), 366 (Freezing Fruits and Vege- 
tables). 

Horticulture 309 (Systematic Pomology), 353 (Sprays and Spraying), 

362 (Nursery Production and Management). 

Business Administration 311 (Introductory Cost Accounting), 370 (Busi- 
ness Law). 

Economics 326 (Banking), 333 (American Economic History), 358 (World 
Resources and Industries), 361 (Marketing Problems), 360 (The Prin- 
ciples of Marketing). 

Plant Pathology 356 (Diseases of Field Crops), 357 (Diseases of Horticul- 
tural Crops). 

Poultry 371 (Commercial Poultry Management), 372 (Poultry Breeding), 
373 (Poultry Diseases and Parasites). 

No course from this group for which the student has credit elsewhere in 
his program may be selected as a Special Elective. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

4. Farm Records and Computations. Five lectures or recitations. The 
Staff. 

Application of economic, statistical and business principles to keeping, analyzing: 
and interpreting farm records and plans. Exercises and course content directly related 
to the characteristics of the different farm enterprises with respect to values of items 
and costs and returns. To serve as a foundation for techniques in computations and 
records for agricultural production. 

10. Rural Economics. 3 hours. Three lectures or recitations. The Staff. 
Introduction to economics of farming, student orientation to entire field of agri- 
cultural economics, application of economics to farm problems. 

301. Farm Organization and Management. Three lectures and two lab- 
oratory periods. Prerequisites: Agricultural Economics 4 and 10. Mr. Proc- 
tor or Mr. Saunders. 

A scientific approach to the study of individual farm programs for the purpose 
of determining methods to be used for increasing farm income. 

304. Marketing Farm Products. Five lectures or recitations. Prerequi- 
site: Agricultural Economics 10. Mr. Rotvan or Mr. Saunders. 

A general course in marketing farm products describing and analyzing marketing 
functions and market agencies: illustrated by visits to marketing concerns. General 
purpose to enable students to have a comprehensive understanding of the princii les 
Of agricultural marketing. 



236 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

351. Agricultural Credit. Five lectures or recitations. Prerequisite: Ag- 
ricultural Economics 10. The Staff. 

Principles of finance applied to farm credit organizations. Practices and princi- 
ples of financing individual farms. 

364. Land Economics. Three lectures and two laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisite: Agricultural Economics 10. Mr. Proctor. 

An appraisal of the agricultural use of land in the United States with special 
attention to Georgia laud. Designed to meet current needs for training in applica- 
tion of economics to use of land by farmers under changing political and social con- 
ditions. 

400. Cooperation in Agriculture. Five lectures. Prerequisites: Agricul- 
tural Economics 304, 351, or equivalent. Mr. Rowan. 

A study of cooperative marketing associations, their organization, and practices. 
A discussion of philosophy and economics of cooperation in agriculture. 

401. Farmer Movements. Prerequisites: Agricultural Economics 4 and 
10. Mr. Proctor. 

History of agricultural organizations ; study of selected rural agencies and organi- 
zations; and a study of the relationship between organizations of rural people and 
their economic well being. 

402. Advanced Farm Organization and Management. Three lectures and 
two laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Agricultural Economics 301, 364, or 
equivalent. Mr. Proctor. 

Continuation of Agricultural Economics 301 with special exercises in appraising 
and analyzing economic facts of individual farms and making adjustments in the use 
of land, labor, and capital with changing farm programs. 

403. Marketing Livestock and Livestock Products. Five lectures. Pre- 
requisites: Agricultural Economics 10, 304, 351, 467, or equivalent. Mr. 
Rowan. 

An economic study of livestock marketing with emphasis on channels of trade and 
methods of distribution, prices, standardization, transportation, regulation and super- 
vision and the way in which marketing functions and agencies implement the market- 
ing of livestock. 

404. Marketing Field Crops and Horticultural Products. Five lectures. 
Prerequisites: Agricultural Economics 10, 304, 351, 467, or equivalent. Mr. 
Rowan. 

An economic study of marketing of field and horticultural crops from the commodity 
approach. 

458. Principles of Agricultural Economics. Five lectures or recitations. 
Prerequisites: Agricultural Economics 10 and two senior division courses in 
Agricultural Economics. Mr. Proctor. 

Causes and effects of agricultural surpluses, factors of production, private and 
governmental control policies, and comparative agricultural enterprises. Application 
of economic theories and principles to agricultural activities. 

467. Agricultural Prices. Five lectures or recitations. Prerequisites: Ag- 
ricultural Economics 10 and two senior division courses in Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. Mr. Rowan. 

Preparation and use of index numbers and other means for analyzing the be- 
havior of farm prices, price theories applied to agriculture, farm price forecasting, 
and outlook. 

469. Farm Finance. 3 hours. Three lectures or recitations. Prerequi- 
sites: Agricultural Economics 10 and two senior division courses in Agri- 
cultural Economics. Mr. Rotvan. 

Principles and practices of agricultural prices, credit and ownership. Designed 
especially for students other than majors in Agricultural Economics. 

470. Current Agricultural Problems. 3 hours. Three lectures or reci- 
tations. Prerequisites: Agricultural Economics 301, 304, or equivalent. Mr. 
Proctor. 

A study of current agricultural problems, factors creating current agricultural sit- 
uations, and methods of analyzing current situations and solving current farm prob- 
lems. 



T HE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 237 

GRADUATE COURSES 

816. Farm Organization Analysis. 3 hours. One lecture and two labora- 
tory periods. Prerequisites: Agricultural Economics 402 and 364 or equiva- 
lent, plus elementary courses in soils and crops and livestock production. 
Mr. Proctor. 

Assemble, appraise, and analyze economic data of individual farms; determine the 
influence of combinations of enterprises: and analyze the individual innut factors 
in producing crops and livestock on such farms. (Given only upon sufficient de- 
mand and approval of professor.) 

817. Research in Farm Organization Substitution. 3 hours. Three lab- 
oratory periods. Prerequisites: Agricultural Economics 402 and 470 or 
equivalent, plus elementary courses in soils and crops and livestock produc- 
tion. Mr. Proctor. 

Substitution analysis and budget research in farm organization and management. 
Make deductions from farm economic data of individual farms and farm plans. (Given 
only upon sufficient demand and approval of professor.) 

821. Public Problems of Agriculture. Five laboratory periods. Prere- 
quisites: Agricultural Economics 301 and 458 or equivalent. Mr. Proctor or 
Mr. Rowan. 

A group discussion of agricultural problems that involve governmental activities. 
(Given only upon sufficient demand and approval of professor.) 

830-831. Agricultural Economics Research. 5 hours each. Prerequisite: 
Thirty or more credit hours in Agricultural Economics or related fields at 
the senior or graduate level. Mr. Proctor. 

Individual research in problems of agricultural economics conducted by students 
under the direction and guidance of the staff of the Department of Agricultural 
Economics. 

930. Thesis Research. 5 to 50 hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION TRAINING 

The concentration offered by this Department is designed for men and 
women who wish to prepare for Agricultural Extension Service careers. It 
is open to men pursuing the B.S.A. curriculum in the College of Agriculture, 
and to women in the School of Home Economics. 

Students who choose this concentration, both men and women, must com- 
plete all freshman and sophomore courses in their respective degree-course 
programs. Upon completion of these requirements, they are to prepare, in 
keeping with the requirements of their respective concentrations, a program 
for their junior and senior years, which must be approved by their major 
professor. 

The concentration which follows this introductory statement sets forth 
the requirements for students in the College of Agriculture who wish to 
meet the qualifications for becoming a county agent. Only those students 
who are farm-reared and have had adequate, practical farm experience will 
be permitted to pursue this training program. 

Two or more of the courses included in the major, one of which shall be 
Agricultural Extension 413, must, normally, be taken during the junior 
year. This will make it possible to provide for one summer's field experi- 
ence, under supervision, to be completed prior to registering for Agricul- 
tural Extension 414, which is a course that may be taken only during the 
senior year. Field experience for a period of two or more months, under an 
approved county agent or some other Extension Service worker, is a re- 
quirement in this concentration. No college credit will be given for field 
experience. 



23S THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION TRAINING 

413. Agricultural Extension Organization and Procedures. Prerequi- 
sites: Two or more junior and senior required courses, B.S.A., degree. The 
Staff. 

Philosophy, procedures, and practices of Extension Service work in agriculture and 
home economics: organization, administration, and financing; relationships with 
cooperating and related organizations and agencies: qualifications, duties, and re- 
sponsibilities of Extension Service workers. 

414. Agricultural Extension Service Programs. Prerequisite: 413. The 
Staff. 

Scope and nature of Extension Service programs at national, state, and county 
levels: emphasis upon techniques, policies, and procedures for developing Extension 
Service programs as basis for work of county and home demonstration agents ; 
activities involved in carrying out programs: evaluation of efforts and results ob- 
tained. 

CONCENTRATION IN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION TRAINING 

Major: 

Agricultural Extension 413 (Agricultural Extension Organi- 
zation and Procedures) ; Sociology 431 (Rural-Urran Sociol- 
ogy) ; Educational Psychology 555 (Psychology of Adoles- 
cence) ; Agricultural Extension 414 (Agricultural Extension 
Programs) 20 Hours 

Science Selections: 

Plant Pathology 353 (Elementary Plant Pathology) ; Veteri- 
nary Hygiene 200 (Animal Diseases) ; Zoology 374 (Economic 
Entomology); Chemistry 346 (Elements of Organic Chemis- 
try) _ 20 Hours 

First Minor 

Agronomy 320 (Southern Field Crops) or Agronomy 321 

(Forage and Pasture Crops); Agronomy 356 (Fertilizers) .._. 10 Hours 

♦Second Minor 

To be selected, with the approval of the major professor, from 
any Department of the College of Agriculture, other than 
Agronomy 10 Hours 

•Special Requirements 

Agricultural Economics 301 (Farm Organization and Manage- 
ment) ; Animal Husbandry 373 (Feeds and Feeding) ; Journal- 
ism 368 (Contemporary Practice) . 15 Hours 

Electives 

To be selected with the objective of providing a well-rounded 
program for the individual. Must be approved by the major pro- 
fessor. May be chosen from the offerings of any Department in 
the University _ 15 Hours 



NOTE: Should the second minor be chosen from either the Department of Agri- 
cultural Economics, or the Department of Animal Husbandry, the course indicated 
as a Special Requirement shall constitute one of the two composing the minor, thus 
providing the opportunity to include in the total program one additional course, 
which may be selected from the offerings of other departments in the College of 
Agriculture, or any other School or College in the University. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRONOMY 

(Conner Hall, South Campus) 

The r-r, urges offered in th* Agronomy Department are designed for stu- 
dents interested in general farm crop production, soil management prac- 
tices, the various fields of specialization in agronomic work, and electives 
for majors in other fields of specialization. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 2_39 

Technical training is offered for those who anticipate work in research, 
teaching, extension work in crops or soils, seed specialization, cotton specili- 
zaiion, soil conservation, soil survey, or fertilizer industry. Provision is 
also made for those who plan to further specialize in graduate study. 

Four concentrations are offered with electives in related fields. 

I. CONCENTRATION IN GENERAL AGRONOMY 

This concentration is designed for students who plan to enter the fields of 
farm management, farm operation, technical planning, or agronomic work 
in soil-conserving programs. This concentration is not designed for those 
who plan to do graduate work. 

Major: Agronomy 320, Agronomy 321, Agronomy 356, Agron- 
omy 356 20 Hours 

Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Plant Pathology 353, Plant 

Pathology 358, Zoology 374 20 Hours 

First Minor: Animal Husbandry 373, Chemistry 346 10 Hours 

Second Minor: Agronomy 332, Agronomy 424 10 Hours 

Special Requirements: Agronomy 458, Botany 380, Plant Path- 
ology 401 15 Hours 

General Electives 15 Hours 

II. CONCENTRATION IN AGRONOMY AND PLANT SCIENCE 

This concentration is offered for those who wish to enter the fields of crop 
production, agronomic research, teaching, extension work in the fields of 
farm crops, and graduate work in these fields. 

Major: Agronomy 320, Agronomy 321, Agronomy 356, Agron- 
omy 423 20 Hours 

Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Plant Pathology 353, Plant 

Pathology 358, Zoology 374 20 Hours 

First Minor: Botany 305, Botany 380 10 Hours 

Second Minor: Plant Pathology 356, Plant Pathology 401 10 Hours 

Special Requirements: Agronomy 355, Botany 323, Botany 375, 

Chemistry 346 20 Hours 

Electives 10 Hours 

III. CONCENTRATION IN SOIL CHEMISTRY. SOIL PHYSICS 

AND SOIL FERTILITY 

This concentration is designed primarily for students who are planning to 
be teachers, research workers, soil technicians, soil surveyors, or other in- 
vestigational workers in soil chemistry, soil physics, and soil fertility, as 
well as for those who expect to do graduate work in these fields. 
Major: Agronomy 353, Agronomy 355, Agronomy 356, Agron- 
omy 459 20 Hours 

Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Chemistry 346, Plant Path- 
ology 353, Zoology 374 20 Hours 

First Minor: Chemistry 3S0. Chemistry 460 10 Hours 

Second Minor: Agronomy 321, Agronomy 460 10 Hours 

Special Requirements: Botany 380, Chemistry 23, Physics 28 15 Hours 

Electives 15 Hours 



240 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

IV. CONCENTRATION IN SOIL CONSERVATION 

This concentration is designed especially for students interested in soil 
conservation, soil improvement, farm program planning, and soil utilization, 
and is not designed for those who plan to do graduate work. This concen- 
tration is given in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural Engi- 
neering. Trigonometry is a prerequisite for this concentration. 

Major: Agronomy 321, Agronomy 353, Agronomy 356, Agron- 
omy 458 - 20 Hours 

Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Chemistry 346, Plant Path- 
ology 353, Zoology 374 20 Hours 

First Minor: Agricultural Engineering 11, Agricultural Engineer- 
ing 224, Agricultural Engineering 226 11 Hours 

Second Minor: Agricultural Economics 301, Animal Husbandry 373 10 Hours 

Special Requirements: Agronomy 355, Botany 375, Botany 380... 15 Hours 

Electtves: 14 Hours 

AGRONOMY 

1. Field Crop Production. Prerequisite: Botany 21. Mr. Miller. 

Adaptation, culture, improvement, harvesting, and uses of the more important 
crops, with special reference to the major crops of Georgia. Laboratory exercises 
include seed studies, introduction to commercial grading of grain, hay, cotton, and 
tobacco, and the identification, adaptation, and use of important legumes and grasses. 

7. Forest Soils. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21-22. Mr. Morris and Mr. 
Stelly. 

Origin, formation, and classification of soils and the physical, chemical, and 
biological properties of soils with emphasis on forest conditions. 

10. Principles of Soils. Prerequisites: Chemistry 21-22. Mr. Morris and 
Mr. Stelly. 

Soil formation: physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils: effects of 
commercial fertilizers, lime, organic matter, and soil management practices on soil 
fertility. 

300. Commercial Cotton Classing. (Good eyesight and color perception 
necessary). The Staff. 

Cotton grades and staples according to Universal Standards for American Upland 
Cotton. Practices consist of classing and stapling several thousand samples of cotton. 

320. Southern Field Crops. Prerequisites: Agronomy 1 and Agronomy 10. 
Mr. Miller. 

The three major cash crops in Georgia, cotton, tobacco, and peanuts, are studied. 
Laboratory exercises deal with botanical and morphological characteristics of the 
crops, and provide training in the fundamentals of cotton classing and tobacco and 
peanut grading. 

321. Forage and Pasture Crops. Prerequisites: Agronomy 1 and 10. Mr. 
Brown. 

Requirements and adaptations of forage crops. Special attention is given to com- 
binations that will furnish ample forage for southern conditions. Establishment and 
management of pastures involving adapted forage crops. Grassland agriculture as a 
means of soil conservation and improvement will be discussed. Laboratory exercises 
deal with the botanical and morphological characteristics of the principal forage plants 
as well as forage seed identification. Field trips will be taken to observe forage crops 
under field conditions. Grading hay according to U. S. standards will also be taken 
up in the laboratory. 

332. Cereal Production. Prerequisites: Agronomy 1 and 10. Mr. Brown. 

Classification improvement, distribution, culture, and uses of small grains and 
corn. Laboratory exercises deal with grain structure, identification of varieties, and 
grain grading by U. S. Standards. 

353. Soil Formation and Classification. Prerequisite: Agronomy 10 or 
equivalent. Mr. Collins. 

Soil formation, classification, and soil survey, including preparation of soil survey 
maps and reports. 

To tliis course, a field trip of one week's duration is required at the student's ex- 
pense and will amount to approximately $30.00 transportation plus the student's room 
and meals while on the trip. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 241 

355. Advanced Soil Management. Prerequisites: Agronomy 1 and 10. Mr. 
Collins. 

Occurrence and properties of predominant soils and management practices to main- 
tain fertility, prevent erosion, and increase crop production. 

356. Fertilizers. Prerequisites: Agronomy 1 and 10. Mr. Collins and 
Mr. Morris. 

Sources ami uses of fertilizer materials, soil conditions affecting uses of fertilizers, 
and presentation of related experimental data. 

403. Crop Improvement. Prerequisites: Agronomy 320 or 321, Plant Path- 
ology 358, or equivalent. Mr. Broicn. 

Improvement of crops by introduction, selection, and hybridization. Methods and 
techniques used in breeding improved varieties will be emphasized. 

423. Principles of Experimental Methods. Prerequisites: Agronomy 321 
and 356, or equivalent. Mr. Morris. 

Principles and practices in plant and animal research with special reference to the 
design and mechanical procedure with experimental plots. The applications of sta- 
tistical methods to laboratory and field results are emphasized. 

424. Crop Plants, Weeds and Seeds. Prerequisites: Agronomy 321 and 355 
or equivalent. Mr. Brown. 

Identification of crop plants and seed, seed certification, seed analysis, and germi- 
nation. Identification of weeds in seed and plant form. Use of chemicals in weed 
control and the effects on crop plants. Review of recent literature in the field. 

425. Pasture Development and Management. Prerequisites: Agronomy 
321 and Agronomy 356 or equivalent. Mr. Brown. 

Requirements and adaptations of pasture species in establishing and maintaining 
pastures in the Southeast. Current research on management practices will be pre- 
sented and evaluated. 

427 a-b-c. Agronomy Seminar. 1 hours each. The Staff. 

Topics related to farm crops and soils will be discussed and reviewed. Partici- 
pation required for credit. Faculty participation encouraged. 

458. Land Use Problems. Prerequisites: Agronomy 321 and 355 or equiva- 
lent. Mr. Morris. 

Review of the principles of soils. Soil and land classification including mapping. 
Soil conservation practices pertaining to land use under Georgia conditions. 

459. Soil Fertility. Prerequisites: Agronomy 355 and 356 or equivalent. 
Mr. Stelly. Mr. Giddens, and Mr. Morris. 

Soil conditions affecting availability of plant nutrients, methods of determining 
soil fertility and insufficiency of plant nutrients in soils, and interpretation of chemi- 
cal and biological measurements as related to fertility maintenance and good soil 
management. 

460. Soil Physics. Prerequisites: Agronomy 353 and Chemistry 380, or 
equivalent. Mr. Stelly. 

Physical properties, moisture relations, and methods of physical analysis of soils. 

461. Soil Microbiology. Prerequisites: Bacteriology 350 and Agronomy 
355 or equivalent. Mr. Giddens. 

Study of characteristics of non-pathogenic microorganisms inhabiting the soil. 
Activities of soil microorganisms such as nitrogen fixation, carbon cycle, and other 
factors affecting soil fertility especially stressed. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

801. Crop Management. Prerequisite: Agronomy 423 or equivalent. Mr. 
Broicn. 

The application of experimental data as obtained from literature reviews and dis- 
cussions to the solution of practical crop management problems. 

825. Special Problems in Agronomy. Prerequisite: At least one course 
in Agronomy with catalogue number 800 or above. Mr. Brown, Mr. Collins. 
Mr. Giddens, Mr. Morris, and Mr. Stelly. 

The planning and completion of short time agronomic problems, other than thesis 
investigations, conducted in the library, field, greenhouse, or laboratory. 

827. Biometry. Prerequisite: Agronomy 423 or equivalent. Mr. Morris. 

A review of elementary statistics; design of experiments; analysis of variance; 
design and analysis of complex experiments. This course is designed to meet the 
needs of students in either plant or animal sciences for Master of Science degree. 



242 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

850. Fertilization and Plant Reactions to Fertilization. Prerequisites: 
Agronomy 321 and 356, or equivalent. Mr. Collins. 

Sources, manufacture, and uses of commercial fertilizers, and the principles involved 
in the application of fertilizers to crops. Fertilizer deficiency symptoms and means 
of correcting deficiencies for various type plants are stressed. 

852. Advanced Soil Fertility. Prerequisites: Chemistry 380 and Agron- 
omy 459, or equivalent. Mr. Morris. 

Physical, chemical, and bacteriological aspects of soil fertility as related to plant 
growth. Laboratory work consists of various chemical analyses of soils and plants. 

853. Methodology in Soil Chemistry. Prerequisites: Chemistry 380 and 
Agronomy 459, or equivalent. Mr. Stelly. 

Special treatment of methods used in soil and plant analyses. Emphasis is placed 
on chemical laboratory methods and equipment used in soil investigations: however, 
physical and biological methods are also presented. Interpretation of experimental 
data is stressed. 

854. Advanced Soil Classification. Prerequisites: Agronomy 353 and 
Chemistry 380, or equivalent. Mr. Stelly. 

Historical geology, weathering of rocks and minerals, factors and processes of soil 
formation, and various concepts of soil classification. The formation, description, and 
classification of the soils of the United States and of Georgia are stressed. 

855. Special Topics in Pedology. Prerequisite: Agronomy 854. Mr. Stelly. 

Discussion of assigned readings and reports on special problems in pedology. Ac- 
tual field training in soil surveying under the supervision of experienced soil sur- 
veyors will be arranged whenever possible. 

930. Thesis Research in Agronomy. 5 to 10 hours. 

Credits in this course must be in addition to the 40 hours required for the M.S.A. 
degree. Prerequisite requirements depend upon research problem and consent of 
major professor. Available by arrangement any quarter to any graduate student 
majoring in agronomy who is a candidate for the Master of Science in Agriculture 
degree. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
(Hardman Hall, South Campus) 
The courses offered by the Department of Animal Husbandry are designed 
to give students basic training in the production of beef cattle, sheep, swine, 
and horses and mules. While most of the courses offered deal with the more 
practical phases of selection, breeding, feeding, and /or management, several 
courses of a technical nature are offered for those students who desire to 
enter some specialized type of work or who plan to follow a program of 
graduate study. 

The courses of the Department are especially planned for students who 
expect to become livestock farmers, Animal Husbandry specialists, county 
agents, vocational agricultural teachers, college teachers, or experiment sta- 
tion workers. They are also suitable for students who intend to enter posi- 
tions with breed associations, feed manufacturers, packing houses, livestock 
commission firms, livestock equipment and supply companies, or livestock 
journals. 

The following program of study is recommended for students desiring to 
major in Animal Husbandry. 

CONCENTRATION IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Major: Animal Husbandry 350, 360, 361, 372, 373 23 Hours 

Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Chemistry 346, Plant Path- 
ology 358, and Zoology 374 20 Hours 

First Minor: Agronomy 321 and 356. _ 10 Hours 

Second Minor: May be selected by student in any department of 
the University, subject to the approval of the Head of the 

Department 10 Hours 

Special Requirements: Food Technology 365 or 418, and Veteri- 
nary Hygiene 200. 10 Hours 

General Electives: Subject to the approval of the Head of the 

Department 17 Hours 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 243 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

1. Introductory Animal Husbandry. 3 hours. Mr. Carmon. 
A study of basic facts, principles, and terminology pertaining to beef cattle, 
sheep, swine, and horses and mules. 

350. Types, Breeds, Classes, and Grades of Livestock. 3 hours. Prere- 
quisite: Animal Husbandry 1. Mr. Carmon. 

A study of the characteristics of the different types, breeds, classes, and grades 
of livestock. 

356. Fitting and Showing Livestock. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Animal 
Husbandry 1. 

A laboratory course designed to train students in the finer points of fitting and 
showing the various classes of beef cattle, hogs, horses and sheep. 

360. Beef Cattle Production. Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 373. Mr. 
Thomason. 

A study of the breeding, feeding, and management of beef cattle. 

361. Swine Production. Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 373. Mr. Dyer. 
A study of the breeding, feeding, and management of swine. 

364. Sheep Production. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 373. 
Mr. Warren. 

A study of the breeding, feeding, and management of sheep. 

366. Livestock Judging. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 350 
or permission of the instructor. Mr. Carmon. 

A course which deals with the selection of livestock for the breeding herd and 
for slaughter. From the students in this course will be chosen the team to represent 
the University in the Annual Spring Intercollegiate Livestock Judging Contests. 

371. Livestock Production. Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 373 recom- 
mended. Mr. Thomason. 

A study of the fundamental principles and practices involved in the profitable pro- 
duction of various classes of farm animals. (Not recommended for Animal Husbandry 
majors. Students taking this course will not receive credit in Animal Husbandry 360, 
361, and 364.) 

372. Breeding and Improvement of Farm Animals. Prerequisites: Animal 
Husbandry 1 and Plant Pathology 358. Mr. Warren and Mr. Carmon. 

A study of the basic principles of genetics and reproduction as related to the 
breeding and improvement of farm animals. 

373. Feeds and Feeding. Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 1 and Chemis- 
try 22. The Staff. 

A study of the basic principles of animal nutrition as related to the feeding of all 
classes of farm livestock. 

376. Advanced Livestock Judging. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Animal Hus- 
bandry 366 or permission of instructor. Mr. Carmon. 

A continuation of Animal Husbandry 366. From the students in this course will 
be chosen the team to represent the University in the Annual Fall Intercollegiate 
Livestock Judging Contests. 

ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE COURSES 

402. Advanced Animal Nutrition. Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 373, 
360 or 361, Chemistry 346, or equivalent. Mr. Cullison and Mr. Dyer. 

A study of the chemical composition and the physical and chemical properties 
of feeds and feed nutrients; the digestion, absorption and metabolism of the nutri- 
ents; factors affecting nutrient utilization; the functions of the different nutrients; 
the nutrient requirements of farm animals ; the effects of nutrient deficiencies and 
how to correct and prevent them. 

403. Advanced Animal Breeding. Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 372, 
Chemistry 346 or equivalent. Mr. Warren. 

A study of the physiology of reproduction, fertility, heredity, artificial insemina- 
tion, and other advanced aspects of animal breeding. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

801-802. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry. 5 hours each. Pre- 
requisites: Animal Husbandry 402 or 403 and permission of instructor. Mr. 
Cullison, Mr. Dyer, and Mr. Warren. 

Library and laboratory problems dealing with different phases of livestock pro- 
duction. 



244 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

805. Experimental Methods in Animal Nutrition. Prerequisite: Animal 
Husbandry 402 or equivalent. Mr. Gullison and Mr. Dyer. 

A study of the experimental methods used in animal nutrition research; the nature 
and significance of chemical determinations, feeding trials, digestion trials, and 
metabolism studies. 

810. Seminar in Animal Husbandry. Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 
360, 361 and 372 or equivalent. The Staff. 

Weekly meetings devoted to discussions of current problems and research in the 
field of Animal Husbandry. 

930. Thesis. 5 to 20 hours. Prerequisites: Two or more graduate courses 
in animal husbandry. Open only to Animal Husbandry majors. Mr. Gulli- 
son, Mr. Dyer, and Mr. Warren. 

The carrying out of laboratory and library research and the development of a 
thesis bearing on the subject under investigation. 

DAIRY DEPARTMENT 

(Dairy Building, South Campus) 

The dairy industry in Georgia has been steadily increasing in importance 
for a number of years. With this growth there has also been an increase in 
the demand for trained personnel in the various phases of the dairy industry. 

With the rapid increase in the industrial development within the state, 
commercial dairying has become of much greater importance. Sales of fluid 
milk are nearly three times that of ten years ago. For the most part, how- 
ever, the milk for butter, cheese, evaporated milk, powder, and similar pro- 
ducts is imported from other states. During recent years much effort has 
been expended toward developing a greater supply of manufacturing grade 
milk. Markets are already being developed for this type of milk. This de- 
velopment of the dairy industry in Georgia has greatly increased the de- 
mand for young men trained in this field. 

The Dairy Building provides adequate facilities for teaching all phases 
of manufacturing, processing, and distributing dairy products. One wing 
of the building houses a dairy manufacturing laboratory which is used for 
training students in the operation of milk processing equipment, the pro- 
cessing of market milk, and the manufacture of ice cream, butter, cheese, 
and condensed milk. 

The dairy farm is provided with modern barns of unusual beauty. A prac- 
tical program of feed production and herd management is conducted for 
the benefit of students in the University, research, and demonstration to 
visitors. A herd of purebred dairy cattle representing the three major breeds 
is maintained on the college farm. 

Special Students. Frequently, requests are received relative to short 
periods of training on a non-degree basis. The laboratories of the department 
are available at all times for informal training under the supervision of the 
person in charge of the laboratory. 

It should also be pointed out that any resident of the state may, under 
certain circumstances, register in the University as a special student and 
take any courses regularly taught. The Dairy Department can usually ar- 
range satisfactory programs of study to fit the needs of the individual. These 
will range from three months (one quarter) to two years (six quarters). 

Concentrations. For students regularly enrolled in the University, the 
Dairy Department offers two concentrations. One of these is in the field of 
dairy production and the other is in the field of dairy manufacturing. The 
suggested programs given here may be altered to suit the needs of the indi- 
vidual student. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 245 

CONCENTRATION IN DAIRY PRODUCTION 
Major: Dairy 390, Dairy 379, Dairy 392, Dairy 394 20 Hours 

Agricultural Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Plant Path- 
ology 358, Chemistry 346, Veterinary Hygiene 200 20 Hours 

First Minor: Animal Husbandry 371 and 373 10 Hours 

Second Minor: To be approved by Head of Department 10 Hours 

Special Requirements: Not more than 20 Hours 

To be approved by Head of the Department. 

General Electives: Not less than 10 Hours 

To be approved by Head of the Department. 

CONCENTRATION IN DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

Major: Dairy 350, Dairy 394, Dairy 395, Dairy 399 20 Hours 

Agricultural Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Chemistry 

346, Plant Pathology 358, Veterinary Hygiene 200 20 Hours 

First Minor: Dairy 389 and Dairy 395 10 Hours 

Second Minor: To be approved by Head of Department 10 Hours 

Special Requirements: Not more than 20 Hours 

To be approved by Head of the Department. 

General Electives: Not less than 10 Hours 

To be approved by Head of the Department. 

DAIRY 

3. Elements of Dairying. 3 hours. Mr. Henderson and the Staff. 

An elementary course in dairying, dealing with the following general subjects : 
Relation of dairying to agriculture; application of the Babcock test to farm prac- 
tices; care and handling of milk and cream on the farm: milk secretion composition 
and food value of milk. 

301-302-303. Dairy Seminar. 1 hour a week each quarter. The Staff. 
Topical discussion of present problems and scientific work in dairying. 

350. Dairy Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 346. Mr. Shearing. 

Composition and properties of milk and its constituents, chemistry of dairy pro- 
cesses, and routine chemical tests for dairy plants and the food value of milk and 
its products. 

379. Dairy Cattle Economics and Selection. Prerequisites: Dairy 390 
and 392, or equivalent. Mr. Deal and Mr. Morrison. 

Study of successful dairy farm economics as based on field trips to practical opera- 
tions. Application of theory to practice. Selection of cattle based on phenotype. Pre- 
paring animals for sales and shows. 

380. Advanced Dairy Cattle Judging. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of 
the instructor. Mr. Morrison. 

A course especially planned to offer instruction in the judging of dairy cattle 
according to type. 

381. Dairy Farm Operations. 3 hours. Mr. Deal. 

Practical experience in the feeding, management, and breeding of cattle on the 
college dairy farm. 

385. Dairy Products, Judging and Grading. 3 hours. Mr. Bennett and 
Mr. Sheuring. 

Scoring and grading of milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream. 

388. Milk Sanitation. 3 hours. Mr. Bennett and Mr. Henderson. 

A course especially designed for students interested in employment in milk in- 
spection work. Training is given in interpretation of the requirements of the U. S. 
Public Health Service Milk Ordinance Code, inspection of dairy farms and pasteuriza- 
tion plants, bookkeeping in accordance with the ordinances, state dairy laws and 
methods used in conducting a milk sanitation program. 



246 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

389. Dairy Bacteriology. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 350. Mr. Bennett. 
Determination of numbers and types of bacteria in dairy products and their 

significance ; the use of microorganisms in the manufacture of dairy products. 

390. Dairy Cattle Improvement. Prerequisites: Plant Pathology 358 and 
Chemistry 346 or equivalent. Mr. Morrison. 

(This course may be taken in lieu of Dairy 3. Credit will not be given for Dairy 3 
if taken following Dairy 391.) 

Application of the fundamentals of anatomy, physiology, nutrition, and endocrin- 
ology as applied to the breeding of dairy cattle. Study of selection factors, pedigrees, 
herd classification, herd records, and herd analysis. 

391. Farm Dairying. Prerequisite: Dairy 3. Mr. Henderson and the Staff. 
Composition and properties of milk. The handling of milk and its products on 

the farm. A brief introduction to dairy manufacture. To be taken by students 
majoring in dairy manufacturing. 

392. Dairy Cattle Feeding and Management. Prerequisites: Chemistry 
346 and Animal Husbandry 373 or equivalent. Mr. Morrison. 

Applications of the fundamentals of anatomy, physiology, nutrition, and endocrin- 
ology as applied to the nutrition, feeding, and management of dairy cattle. 

394. Market Milk. Prerequisite: Dairy 3. Mr. Henderson and Mr. Shew- 
ing. 

Sanitary production and processing of milk supply, milk inspection systems, and 
marketing milk. 

395. Dairy Plant Management. Prerequisite: Dairy 3. Mr. Sheuring. 
Fundamental principles of the management of creameries and other dairy manu- 
facturing plants. 

399. Ice Cream Making. Prerequisite: Dairy 3. Mr. Sheuring. 
Care and preparation of ingredients : manufacture of plain and fancy ice cream 
and related products. 

400-401. Advanced Dairy Bacteriology. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Dairy 
350, 389, and Bacteriology 350. Mr. Bennett and Mr. Sheuring. 

More detailed study of the bacteriology of dairy manufactures and additional 
bacteriological test of milk and its products. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

703. Problems in Dairy Manufacturing. Prerequisites: Bacteriology 350, 
Chemistry 346, and one major course in dairy manufacturing (or equivalent). 
Mr. Sheuring. (This course is not open to dairy majors). 

A study of problems involved in the production, processing, storage, and mar- 
keting of various dairy products, with special reference to market milk and related 
products and ice cream. 

704. Problems in Dairy Husbandry. Prerequisites: Dairy 391, Animal 
Husbandry 373, and Plant Pathology 358 (or equivalent). Mr. Morrison. 

(This course not open to dairy majors). 

A study of the basic principles of nutrition, physiology, genetics, and endocrin- 
ology in dairy cattle and their practical application to dairy farming. 

805-806. Dairy Cattle Feeding and Management. 10 hours. Prerequi- 
sites: Dairy 390, 392, and 394, or equivalents. 

A study of research work on the subject with problems to be selected. 

807-808. Butter Making. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Dairy 394 and 397. 
Mr. Henderson and Mr. Bennett. 
Manufacture of creamery butter. 

809-810. Market Milk. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Dairy 394 and 399. Mr. 
Henderson and Mr. Sheuring. 

The handling and distribution of fluid milk. 

811-812. Ice Cream Making. Prerequisites: Dairy 394 and 399. Mr. Sheur- 
ing. 

Care and preparation of ingredients: manufacture of plain and fancy ice cream 
and related products. 

930. Thesis Research in Dairying. 5 to 50 hours. 

Offered any quarter to meet the needs of any candidate for a degree of Master 

of Science in Agriculture. Open only to graduate students majoring iu the field 
of dairying. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 247 

DEPARTMENT OF FOOD TECHNOLOGY 

(South Campus) 

Food processing has been steadily increasing in importance in the South- 
east for a number of years. The growth of the food processing industries has 
created a demand for college graduates with training in food technology. 

The Department of Food Technology offers both undergraduate and grad- 
uate instruction designed to give basic, technical training for the laboratory 
and production phases of the following industries: canning, freezing, pickling, 
preserving, meat processing, and the preparation and preservation of specialty 
food products. Superior students are encouraged tc undertake graduate study 
because of the greater opportunities open to food technologists with an ad- 
vanced degree. 

The department has facilities for instruction and for research. The facili- 
ties for instruction are sufficiently large to enable the student to obtain 
practical experience. The department has a Food Processing Center contain- 
ing a community-type canning plant, cold storage and freezing rooms, com- 
mercial canning equipment, and a research laboratory. In addition, the de- 
partment has a commercial-type Meat Processing Plant equipped to process 
large quantities of beef, pork, and other meats. 

A special Locker Operation and Management Training School is conducted 
each year for persons working in freezer locker plants and for special stu- 
dents who wish to qualify for positions in locker plants. 

Occupations open to graduates are briefly: teaching, extension work with 
the state and federal agencies; research work with experimental stations, fed- 
eral agencies, or private industry; locker operation; technical sales, and 
production work with food processors and equipment or container manu- 
facturers; food consulting; food inspecting; and promotional work with pub- 
lic utilities. 

Concentrations are not listed herewith but are planned to meet the need 
of the individual student. Minor work is offered to students taking their 
major work in other departments. The Department offers major work for 
the degree of Master of Science in Agriculture. 



DEPARTMENT OF FOOD TECHNOLOGY 

363. Food Preservation. 

An introduction to the field of food preservation with emphasis on the standard 
practices of canning, freezing, and dehydration. A complete unit for those desiring 
a general course or for those interested in community food preservation. 

365. Meat Cutting. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 350. Mr. Flanagan. 

This course is designed to teach students and prospective locker operators skills 
in cutting beef, pork, lamb, and poultry suitable for markets, locker plants, and 
home use. 

409. Community and Home Food Preservation. Prerequisites: Bacteri- 
ology 350 and Chemistry 346 or equivalent. 

The principles of food preservation will be studied with reference to present prac- 
tices and possible improved practices in home and community food preservation. 
The effect of various methods of food preservation will be evaluated in terms of 
public health, food spoilage, food quality, and the nutritional value of the foods. 

411. Food Products Manufacture. Prerequisites: Bacteriology 350 and 
Food Technology 363. Mr. Powers. 

The production of commercially packed products will be studied with reference to 
present practices; the development of better practices through research and the appli- 
cation of food technology principles; the characteristics, uses, and the limitations of 
various types of containers and food ingredients; and the food purity laws. 

412. Commercial Practices. Prerequisite: Food Technology 411. Mr. 
Powers. 

A continuation of Food Technology 411 involving the same principles but with em- 
phasis on the advanced studies of jams, jellies, fermentation, and dehydration. 



248 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

414. Food Analysis and Grading. Prerequisites: Bacteriology 350, Food 
Technology 363, and Chemistry 23. Mr. Powers. 

This course is designed to teach the students methods of food examination basic 
to the detection of adulteration, to food grading, to quality control, and as a training 
in technique for research studies. Particular emphasis will be placed on the students* 
learning to use such sources of information as the Methods of Analysis of the Associa- 
tion of Official Agricultural Chemists and of the American Public Health Associa- 
tion, and Chemical Abstracts in planning, making, and interpreting analysis new to 
them. Physical and organoleptic methods of grading foods, such as are used by the 
Processed Food Inspection Service of the Agricultural Marketing Administration, 
will also be taught to prepare graduates for governmental service and to make them 
conscious of the factors affecting the quality of processed foods. 

415 a-b. Seminar. 1 hour each. Prerequisite: Food Technology 363 or 409. 
The Staff. 

The purpose of the course will be to stimulate the students' interest in food pro- 
cessing and to broaden their knowledge of the industry by discussion of important or 
recent experimental work, by the students reporting and discussing current trade 
and scientific articles, and by bringing to them speakers who are authorities on some 
phase of agriculture, industry, science, or education. 

415c. Seminar. 1 hour. Same as the above course. 

417. Food Industries Survey. Prerequisites: Food Technology 363 and 409 
or equivalent. Mr. Powers. 

This course includes the study of the sources of raw materials, the processing, 
storage, and handling of such processed foods as sugar, flour, salt, and spices; and 
the problems involved in the production of these products. 

418. Meat Processing. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 350. Mr. Flanagan. 
This course includes instruction in killing, skinning, dressing of pork and beef; 

grading, care of hides; utilization of inedibles ; curing of beef and pork; artery and 
stitch pumping; smoking, packaging, and storing of cured pork products; manufac- 
ture of specialty meat products. 

421. Food Inspection and Analysis. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 405. Mr. 
Powers. 

Food will be examined from a microbiological aspect. Special techniques as prac- 
ticed in the food industry will be used. Emphasis will be placed on correlating the 
microbial flora of canned food with canning procedures. Processing times will be 
determined using Balls mathematical methods, as well as the general method. 

422. Advanced Food Analysis. Prerequisite: Food Technology 421 and 
Bacteriology 405. Mr. Powers. 

A continuation of Food Technology 421. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

819-820. Methods in Food Technology. Prerequisite: Food Technology 614. 
Mr. Powers. 

Selected problems associated with food preservation will be studied intensively to 
extend the student's knowledge of food technology principles and to develop greater 
facility in the application of scientific methods to the solution of new problems. Princi- 
ples and techniques from both basic and applied fields of science will be studied. 

822. Instrumentation in Food Analysis. Prerequisite: Food Technology 
621. Mr. Powers. 

Polarographic. spectrophotometry, colorimetric, and other methods of analysis will 
be studied. Emphasis will be placed upon correlation and interpretation of results. 

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE 

(Conner Hall, South Campus) 

The field of horticulture is concerned with the production and marketing 
of vegetables, fruits, flowers and ornamental plants. Specialized training 
is offered in each of these divisions. 

The concentration in Vegetable Crops prepares students for truck grow- 
ing, market gardening, production of vegetables for processing, vegetable 
plant production, and vegetable seed production. In addition, graduates may 
be employed in allied industries servicing and supplying vegetable pro- 
ducers. Salesmen for equipment, fertilizers, spray materials and seed; opera- 
tors of farmers' or cooperative markets; buyers or representatives for chain 
stores; and field men for canneries or quick freeze plants are examples. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 249 



Opportunities are available as well in transportation, inspection, marketing, 
and regulatory services. Advanced work leads to positions in teaching, exten- 
sion and research. 

Opportunities in Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture lie chiefly in 
the commercial field. Many graduates go into business for themselves as 
producers of flowers and ornamentals. Openings are also available for green- 
house technicians, foremen or managers; specialists for pruning, spraying, 
and transplanting for large nurseries; for salesmen in wholesale commission 
houses or with seedsmen or brokers; for the development and maintenance 
of grounds of industrial concerns and other institutions; and in cemetery 
and park work. Students who continue in graduate work either here or at 
some other institution have excellent openings in teaching, research, and 
extension. 

Training in the Pomology concentration prepares students for the efficient 
commercial production of tree and small fruits. Opportunities are also found 
in work with the industries which service or supply the fruit growers. Some 
of these are salesmen for equipment, fertilizers, and spray materials; opera- 
tors of farmers' or cooperative markets; operators of large orchards or small 
fruit plantings; buyers or representatives for chain stores or other concerns 
and field men for canneries. Advanced degrees lead to a variety of openings 
in teaching, extension, and research. 

The Department of Horticulture has greenhouses, gardens, and a one- 
hundred and twenty acre farm, eight acres of which are under irrigation. 
Numerous varieties of fruits, flowers and vegetables are produced for instruc- 
tional and experimental purposes. 

Students may enter the concentrations in the Department of Horticulture 
at the completion of the required freshman and sophomore courses in Agri- 
culture or their equivalent. 

Those interested in Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture may enter 
as juniors if they have completed the junior college work as offered in the 
University System (or its equivalent) for the B.S.A., B.S., B.S.H.E., or A.B. 
degree. Students who have completed their junior college work in schools 
other than that of the College of Agriculture should schedule 10 hours each 
of botany and chemistry as they are the prerequisites to the work in Flori- 
culture and Ornamental Plant Production. They must also take Horticul- 
ture 1. Agronomy 1 and Agronomy 10. If they have had the required botany 
and chemistry these three courses will be scheduled as junior-senior elec- 
tives. Students entering these fields under the above conditions will not be 
permitted to change to other agricultural concentrations without satisfying 
the junior college requirement of the College of Agriculture. 

HORTICULTURAL CONCENTRATIONS IN FRUIT PRODUCTION. VEGE- 
TABLE PRODUCTION, FLORICULTURE. AND ORNAMENTAL 
PLANT PRODUCTION 

Major; Two 300 and two 400 courses in horticulture 20 Hours 

Agricultural Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Plant Path- 
ology 353 and 358, Zoology 374 20 Hours 

First Minor: To be approved by Head of Department. Two junior 

or senior courses in any one Department of the University 10 Hours 

Second Minor: Two junior or senior courses in any Department of 

the College of Agriculture. Approved by Head of Department—. 10 Hours 

Special Requirements: Two courses selected: Chemistry 346, 

Agronomy 356, Plant Pathology 357, Botany 380 10 Hours 

General Electives Suggested: Animal Husbandry 373, Botany 323. 
Botany 380. Food Technology (one course), Chemistry 346, 
Agronomy 356, Plant Pathology 357, Landscape Architecture 
313, Agricultural Economics 304, Advanced Military Science 
350 a-b-c, 351 a-b-c. Electives to be adapted to fit special cases..- 20 Hours 



250 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

HORTICULTURE 

1. General Horticulture. Prerequisite: Botany 21. Mr. Johnstone and 
Mr. Keener. 

A survey of the field of horticulture with discussions of the principles and prac- 
tices used in vegetable, fruit, flower, and ornamental plant production. This course 
is designed primarily for the student who wishes only a relatively superficial knowl- 
edge of the field of horticulture or an introductory course to help the student decide 
whether or not to concentrate in one of the four divisions of horticulture. The 
propagation of all kinds of horticultural crops is discussed and demonstrated. This 
course should be scheduled in the freshman or sophomore year. 

308. Principles and Practices of Commercial Production of Floricul- 
tural and Ornamental Horticultural Crops. 3 hours. Prerequisite i Horti- 
culture 1. Mr. Bowden. 

A study of the principles of plant growth as they are applied to the production 
of flowers and other ornamentals. Emphasis is placed on the effect of temperatures, 
light, nutrients, and water as affecting growth and development. This course should 
be selected by non-majors desiring only one course in floriculture. Required by 
majors. 

310. Greenhouse Construction and Management. 2 hours. Mr. Bowden. 

Emphasis is placed upon types of greenhouses and methods of construction; geo- 
graphical and topographical locations; structural materials; heating; equipment: 
plans; estimates; irrigation; and management. Cloth and lath or slat houses; cold- 
frames and hotbeds; pits and storage houses. 

311. Floral Design. 3 hours. Mr. Bowden. 

The commercial aspects of floral design. Emphasis is placed upon the science, art, 
and psychology of color; line and design; floral designs, basket and bowl arrange- 
ments; church, house, hotel and wedding decorations as well as wedding bouquets, 
corsages and emblems. 

316. Flower Store Management. 2 hours. Mr. Bowden. 

A study of materials, equipment, supplies, and arrangement of retail floral shops. 
Sources of flowers and supplies. 

321. The Maintenance of Ornamental Plantings and Landscape Man- 
agement. (Landscape Architecture). 3 hours. Prerequisite: Horticulture 1. 
Mr. Bowden and Mr. Wigginton. 

Formulation and study of a work program which considers those essential opera- 
tions contributing to the successful landscape management of grounds. Methods of 
maintaining lawns, hedges, perennial and annual beds and borders, walks, pools, 
trees, specimen plants and other ornamental plantings. 

353. Sprays and Spraying. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Horticulture 1 and 
Plant Pathology 353. Mr. Curtis. 

A study of the chemistry, preparation, and application of sprays to various horti- 
cultural crops, with special attention given to the economical and practical applica- 
tion of the work. 

362. Nursery Production and Management. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Hor- 
ticulture 1. Mr. Keener. 

Economical and practical methods of plant propagation receive attention, as well 
as culture, protection, and management of nursery properties. 

400. Horticultural Seminar. 1 hour. The Staff. 

Open to all students in related fields. Attendance without registering for credit 
is permitted. Papers on selected topics to be presented by advanced students, faculty 
members, and guest speakers. 

401. The Fundamentals of Fruit Production. Prerequisites: Horticul- 
ture 353 or Plant Pathology 353, Botany 380 or equivalent. Mr. Curtis. 

This course deals with the biological and chemical principles of plant life as 
directly applied to the economic production of fruit crops. 

402. Commercial Fruit Production. Prerequisite: Horticulture 401 and 
Botany 380. The Staff. 

A careful and intensive study is made of the major pomological crops of the South 
and the nation as a whole. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the 
present practices followed throughout the country in commercial fruit growing. 

403. The Principles of Vegetable Production. Prerequisites: Horticulture 

353 and Botany 380 or equivalent. Mr. Johnstone and Mr. Keener. 

A study of the principles and general practices involved in the production of vege- 
table crops. 

404. Commercial Vegetable Production. Prerequisite: Horticulture 403. 
Mr. Keener. 

A stndv of the history, plant characteristics, varieties, soil adaptation and prepara- 
tion, culture, nutrient requirements, and cost of production of the principal vege- 
table crops, with particular reference to the Southeastern United States. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 251 



407-408. Special Problems in Horticulture. 2-5 hours each. For summer 
work 10 hours must be scheduled. Prerequisites: Horticulture 1, and at least 
10 hours in one of the horticultural concentrations, or equivalent, in experi- 
ence or other combinations of courses. The Staff. 

This course is designed for the advanced undergraduate or graduate student who 
wishes to work out a problem of special interest or for the student who wishes to 
gain practical experience. It is required of all major students who do not have a 
farm or plant production background. 

410. Growing Ornamental Plants. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Horticulture 
353 and Botany 380. Mr. Bowden. 

This course will be a study of nursery, perennial crops and the handling of orna- 
mental plants, cultivation, fertilization, pruning, training, harvesting, transplanting 
and ecological adaptations. 

412. The Production of Major Winter Cut Flowers. 3 hours. Prerequi- 
sites: Botany 380 and any senior college course in floriculture. Mr. Bowden. 

This course is concerned primarily with the major crops grown under glass for sale. 

413. The Production of Pot Plants and Minor Flowers. 3 hours. Pre- 
requisite: Horticulture 412. Mr. Bowden. 

This course deals with the production of pot plants and minor cut flowers not dis- 
cussed in 412. 

414. The Production of Spring and Summer Cut Flower Crops. 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: Horticulture 413. Mr. Bowden. 

This course is concerned with the production of high temperature indoor cut flowers 
and outdoor cut flowers. 

421. The Handling, Preparation for Market, and Storage of Fruits and 
Vegetables. Prerequisites: Two senior college courses in fruits or vegeta- 
bles. Mr. Johnstone. 

A study of the operation involved and the equipment and supplies used in the har- 
vesting, handling, preparation for market and storage of fruits and vegetables. 

422. Small Fruit and Grape Production. 3 hours. Prerequisites: One 
senior college course in fruit production and Plant Pathology 357. Mr. John- 
stone. 

This is a specialized course concerned with the production of grapes, blue-berries, 
strawberries, blackberries, dewberries and other small fruits. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

701. Advanced General Horticulture. Prerequisites: Any two senior 
college courses in horticulture or allied sciences. Mr. Johnstone and Staff. 

A study of the applications of the principles of horticulture to the growing of the 
major horticultural crops of Georgia. Practical and up-to-date information will be 
stressed. Designed for students working toward the Master of Agriculture or the 
Master of Education degrees. 

801. Horticultural Crop Improvement. Prerequisite: Plant Pathology 358, 
401 or equivalent. Mr. Johnstone. 

A study of the applications of the principles of genetics and plant breeding to the 
modification and improvement of horticultural plants. The maintenance of improved 
strains and seed production are also considered. 

809. The History, Literature, and Development of Horticulture. Prere- 
quisites: Two senior college courses in Horticulture. Mr. Curtis. 

This course traces the important steps in the development of the applied science 
of horticulture as it is today. Particular reference is made to contributions of 
outstanding leaders in horticultural enterprises and organized research. 

814. Methods in Horticultural Research. Prerequisites: A B.S. or B.S.A. 
degree or equivalent in Horticulture or related field. Mr. Johnstone and 
Staff. 

This course is designed primarily for the student who intends to complete the work 
for a Ph.D. degree or who wishes employment in a research position as technician 
or who intends to instruct at the college level. Field and laboratory methods in use 
in horticultural research are discussed and demonstrated or applied in laboratory 
exercises. This will include techniques from fundamental fields such as plant physiol- 
ogy, genetics, plant pathology, chemistry and biometry as these are applied to the 
solution of horticultural problems. 

930. Research and Thesis. Prerequisite: 10 hours or more of graduate 
work (courses) in horticulture. The Staff. 



252 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 
AND PLANT BREEDING 

(Plant Pathology Building, South Campus) 

The recent introduction of many new diseases of agricultural crops and 
the importance placed on breeding plants for resistance to diseases has 
greatly increased the demand for trained personnel in these fields. 

The specialized courses given in this department are designed to give 
instruction in the agencies causing diseases in plants and their effects upon 
the plant. They also include the principal methods by which these diseases 
may be controlled. The student also receives training in the principles and 
methods used in development of new varieties or strains of cultivated plants 
which are better adapted to agricultural uses and which are more resistant 
to certain diseases. 

Students who specialize in this department receive training that will pre- 
pare them for work in the following fields: 

1. Experiment station or U. S. D. A. specialists 

2. Agricultural Extension agents 

3. State plant inspectors 

4. Research or sales promotion workers for manufacturers of fungi- 
cides or insecticides 

5. Specialized types of agriculture such as commercial plant growers 
or breeders of certified seed 

6. Preparation for advanced study in fields of plant pathology or plant 
breeding leading toward the doctorate. 

The outline of study is so arranged that the student may concentrate on 
diseases or breeding of crops with which he will later be concerned. The 
following concentrations are proposed but can be modified within a fairly 
wide degree of latitude depending upon the requirements of the student. 

CONCENTRATION IN FIELD CROP DISEASES 

Major: Plant Genetics 401, Plant Pathology 356, 420, 421 20 Hours 

Agricultural Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Plant Path- 
ology 353, 358, Zoology 374 20 Hours 

First Minor: Agronomy 320, 321 10 Hours 

Second Minor: Botany 323, 380 ._ 10 Hours 

General Electives From: Agronomy 355, 356, 423, Agricultural 
Economics 364, Botany 305, 483, Chemistry 346, Horticulture 
353, Plant Breeding 402 30 Hours 

CONCENTRATION IN TRUCK CROP DISEASES 

Major: Plant Genetics 401, Plant Pathology 357, 420, 421 20 Hours 

Agricultural Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Plant Path- 
ology 353, 358, Zoology 374 20 Hours 

First Minor: Horticulture 403, 404 10 Hours 

Second Minor: Botany 323, 380 10 Hours 

General Electives From: Agronomy 356, Agricultural Economics 
364, Botany 305, 482, Chemistry 346, Horticulture 353, Plant 
Breeding 402 _ 30 Hours 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 253 

CONCENTRATION IN FRUIT TREE DISEASES 
Major: Plant Genetics 401, Plant Pathology 357, 420, 421 20 Hours 

Agricultural Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Plant Path- 
ology 353, 358, Zoology 374 20 Hours 

First Minor: Horticulture 401, 402 10 Hours 

Second Minor: Botany 323, 380 10 Hours 

General Electives From: Agronomy 355, 356, Agricultural Eco- 
nomics 364, Botany 483, Chemistry 346, Horticulture 353, Plant 
Breeding 402 30 Hours 

CONCENTRATION IN PLANT BREEDING 
Major: Agronomy 423, Plant Pathology 356 or 357, 401, 402 20 Hours 

Agricultural Science Selections: Bacteriology 350, Plant Path- 
ology 353, 358, Zoology 374 __ 20 Hours 

First Minor: Two senior division courses in College of Agriculture 

to be approved by the major professor 10 Hours 

Second Minor: Botany 323, 380 10 Hours 

General Electives From: Senior division courses from appropriate 
Plant Science Departments or Chemistry, Mathematics, or Ag- 
ricultural Economics 30 Hours 



PLANT PATHOLOGY AND PLANT BREEDING 

353. Elementary Plant Pathology. Three lecture and two laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22. Mr. Thompson. 

A general introduction to the diseases of plants. Twenty types will be studied in 
field and laboratory. 

354. Forest Pathology. Three lecture and two laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Botany 21-22. Mr. Thompson. 

This course will be similar to Elementary Plant Pathology 353, but will differ in 
the use of types causing death or decay in trees. Methods of control suitable to both 
forest and city conditions will be studied. 

356. Diseases of Field Crops. Three lecture and two double laboratory 
periods. Prerequisite: Plant Pathology 353. Mr. Miller. 

A course designed to meet the needs of students in plant pathology and agronomy. 

357. Diseases of Horticultural Crops. Three lecture and two double 
laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Plant Pathology 353. Mr. Miller. 

A study in the more important diseases of fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals. 

358. Principles of Breeding. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22, or Zoology 
25-26. Mr. Fleming or Mr. Miller. 

An introductory course in agricultural genetics designed to acquaint the student 
with principles of heredity and variation and their application to breeding. 

401. Plant Genetics. Prerequisite: Plant Pathology 358. Mr. Fleming. 
Advanced studies in inheritance of plants, including the genetics of sterility and 

disease resistance, and the principles of plant improvement. 

402. Advanced Plant Breeding. Prerequisite: Plant Pathology 358. Mr. 
Fleming. 

Advanced study of principles and methods of plant breeding, with special em- 
phasis on techniques involved in conducting plant breeding projects. 

420-421. Mycology. 5 hours each. Three lecture and two double labora- 
tory periods. Double course. Prerequisites: Plant Pathology 353 and an- 
other suitable senior division course. Mr. Miller and Mr. Thompson. 

A systematic study of the fungi with special emphasis on those that cause plant 
disease or forest decay. Technique of culture methods, isolation, sectioning, and 
inoculation is included. 



254 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

GRADUATE COURSES 

800-801. Research in Plant Pathology. 5 hours each. Prerequisites: 
Two senior division courses in Plant Pathology. Mr. Miller and Mr. Thom- 
pson.. 

This course involves the prosecution of a problem in plant disease with parallel 
reading and conferences with the instructor. 

810-811. Research in Plant Genetics. 5 hours each. Prerequisites: Two 
senior division courses in Plant Pathology. Mr. Fleming. 

This series consists of a breeding problem with field studies, appropriate read- 
ings, and conferences. 

DEPARTMENT OF POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

(Poultry Building, South Campus) 

The courses in the Department of Poultry Husbandry are designed to pre- 
pare the student for work in the poultry industry, its allied fields, and to 
pursue graduate study. 

Students who major in this department receive training that will prepare 
them for work in the following fields: 

1. Commercial poultry farming. 

2. The feed industry: diet formulation and sales. 

3. Experiment Station and Extension specialist. 

4. The hatchery business: incubation and hatching egg production. 

5. Advance study leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. in the fields of poultry 
nutrition, genetics, pathology, and physiology. 

The poultry industry in Georgia ranks very near the top among the agri- 
cultural enterprises which bring the greatest cash income to the farmers. 
The demand for well trained men in poultry husbandry far exceeds the num- 
ber of graduates. The industry is growing constantly and as it grows the 
demand for trained men also increases. 

Adequate facilities and technical equipment are available for both teach- 
ing and research uses. 

More than thirty breeding pens are available for teaching and research 
use. Five thousand laying birds are cared for, including the birds entered 
in the Georgia Random Sample Egg Test. This contest brings to the campus 
the products of the nation's outstanding poultry breeders. Incubators and 
brooding capacity allows the hatching and rearing of some 30,000 chickens 
annually. 

Students majoring in poultry have opportunity for experience in poultry 
disease diagnosis. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Major: Poultry 372, 373, 374, 375, and an additional 6 hours in Poul- 
try Husbandry 20 Hours 

First Minor: Animal Husbandry 373 and 402 10 Hours 

Second Minor: Any Department in the University subject to the 

approval of the head of the department. 10 Hours 

Science Selections: Vet. Hygiene 381, Chemistry 346, Mathematics 

356, Plant Pathology 358 20 Hours 

Special Requirements: Human Biology 1 and 2 or Zoology 25, 26 ... 10 Hours 

General Electives: Subject to the approval of the Head of the 

Department 20 Hours 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 2_55 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

60. Poultry Biology and Production. Mr. Huston and Mr. Wheeler. 

An introductory course designed to provide basic information in poultry husbandry. 
A survey of all phases of poultry husbandry is combined with a study of the biology 
of the fbwl. The latter includes the anatomy and physiology of the digestive, respira- 
tory, and reproductive tracts. The endocrine system and the principles of inheritance 
are* considered. 

371. COMMERCIAL POULTRY MANAGEMENT. 3 hours. Mr. HustOU. 

A detailed study of the management practices used in commercial egg and broiler 
production. The laboratory includes practice in culling and selection, vaccination, 
caponization. and the management of large flocks. 

372. Poultry Breeding. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Plant Pathology 358 or 
Zoology 370. The Staff. 

A consideration of the inheritance of morphological and psychological characters, 
including meat and egg production. Emphasis is on the development of criteria for 
selection and the development of genetically sound poultry breeding programs. 

373. Poultry Diseases and Parasites. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Poultry 
Husbandry 60 and Bacteriology 350 or Veterinary Hygiene 381. Mr. Ellis. 

The course is available to students majoring in poultry husbandry and others that 
are qualified. It is a study of the common diseases and parasites of poultry, their 
cause, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. 

374. Seminar and Thesis. Prerequisites: Poultry Husbandry 60, 372. 373, 
375, and 376. The Staff. 

The student is permitted to select a definite field of endeavor and must develop 
a project and carry it through to completion. A thesis on the project is required. 
The student is required to stay through holidays if necessary to look after the 
project. 

375. Poultry Nutrition. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 60. 
Mr. Fuller. 

A study of the digestive physiology and nutritive requirement of the fowl as the 
basis for evaluating feedstuffs and formulating practical poultry rations. 

376. Marketing Poultry and Poultry Products. 3 hours. Prerequisite: 
Poultry Husbandry 60. Mr. Huston. 

This course includes the care and handling of products prior to marketing: the 
processing of poultry and poultry products and the general practices of marketing. 

377. Physiology of Hatchability. 3 hours. Mr. Huston. 

A lecture and problem course in incubation, considering the heredity, nutritional, 
and environmental factors affecting the development and hatching of chicks. (Offered 
in alternate years.) 

378. Anatomy of the Domestic Fowl. 3 hours. Mr. Wheeler. 

A lecture and laboratory study of the gross and microscopic anatomy of the bird 
with special reference to domestic fowls. 

401. Avian Physiology. Four double laboratory periods. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 346, Poultry Husbandry 373, 375, and 377. Mr. Wheeler. 

A study of the physiology of circulation, respiration, digestion, metabolism, and 
the nervous system of the fowl with special emphasis on the glands of internal secre- 
tion. For advanced undergraduates and students in veterinary medicine. Ordinarily 
taught in the summer session. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

801. Advanced Poultry Breeding. Prerequisites: Plant Pathology 358 or 
Zoology 370, and Poultry Husbandry 372. Mr. Huston. 

The development of practical poultry breeding programs with a sound genetical 
background. A study is made of the mode of inheritance and relative heritability 
of various characteristics of economic importance and criteria for effective selection 
toward their improvement. 

802. Problems in Poultry Marketing. Prerequisites: Poultry Husbandry 
371, 372, and 376. Mr. Wheeler. 

A course designed to permit the student to make an intensive study of some prob- 
lem in the field of egg and poultry marketing. 

803. Studies in Poultry Nutrition. Prerequisites: Poultry Husbandry 
371, 373, and 375. Mr. Fuller. 

An independent study is made of some problems dealing with the application of 
fundamental and nutrition findings to practical poultry feeding, either in the form- 
ulation of feeds or in methods of feeding. 



256 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

804. Poultry Pathology. Prerequisites: Bacteriology 350 and Poultry- 
Husbandry 373. Mr. Ellis. 

An intensive course in poultry disease diagnosis. Various diseases will be studied, 
using cases sent in from the field as materials, and the development of skill in the 
use of laboratory diagnostic techniques will be emphasized. 

806. Physiology of Avian Reproduction. Prerequisites: Poultry Husban- 
dry 372 and 373. Mr. Wheeler. 

A consideration of the fundamental biological aspects of avian reproduction. Knowl- 
edge of the fundamentals and mastery of techniques will be utilized in the working 
of problems in reproduction in the domestic fowl. 

930. Research and Thesis. 5 to 20 hours. Prerequisites: two or more 
graduate courses in poultry husbandry. The Staff. 



GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

This concentration, known as General Agriculture, is open to any Junior 
and Senior student in the College of Agriculture. It is a combination of 
courses selected from all departments in the College. Students wishing to 
register for this program should report to the Associate Dean of the College. 

General Agriculture represents a program recommended for students wish- 
ing to prepare themselves for entering upon the business of general farming. 
As compared with majoring in any specific department, it may offer greater 
freedom in course selection. 

GENERAL CONCENTRATION FOR EXTENSION WORKERS 

Major: Agronomy 320, 321 and 356, Animal Husbandry 350, Poul- 
try Husbandry (any 300 course) 21 Hours 

Agricultural Science Selection: Bacteriology 350, Plant Path- 
ology 353 and 358, Zoology 374 20 Hours 

First Minor: Agricultural Economics 301 and 304 10 Hours 

Second Minor: Animal Husbandry 373, Horticulture 353 10 Hours 

Special Requirements: Veterinary Medicine 200 5 Hours 

General Electives From: Dairy Husbandry 391, Animal Husban- 
dry 371, Food Technology 363, Agronomy 332, Poultry Hus- 
bandry (any 3-hour course other than selection for major), Ag- 
ricultural Economics 351, 364 or 400, 467 or 469, Horticulture 
403, Agricultural Engineering 6, 11, 61 or 62, 70 or 280. Ad- 
vanced Military Science 350a-b-c and 351 a-b-c or Air Science 
355a-b-c and 356a-b-c 19 Hours 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY* 

(Conner Hall, South Campus, Terrell Hall, North Campus) 

Instruction in this division of the Department of Chemistry is designed 
primarily to fit the needs of agricultural students. By means of lectures, 
recitations, and laboratory work, students are taught the fundamental chemi- 
cal principles underlying and controlling plant and animal life. 

The course for majors in agricultural chemistry is designed to prepare 
students for work in agricultural experiment stations, in fertilizer and feed 
control laboratories, and similar positions in allied industries. 



♦Agricultural chemistry courses are a sub-division of the Department of Chem- 
istry of the College of Arts and Sciences. For other offerings see the bulletin of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



21, 22. General Chemistry. Four lectures or recitations and one labora- 
tory period per week each quarter. Breakage deposit, $5 for each course. 
The Staff and Assistants. 

The first course covers the chemistry of the non-metallic elements, including a 
systematic treatment of chemical principles and their applications. The second course 
is a continuation of the first course, including a general survey of the metallic ele- 
ments. 

23. Qualitative Inorganic Analysis. Two lectures or recitations and 
three laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 22. Breakage deposit, 
$5. Mr. Smith, Mr. Spell, Mr. Whitehead, Mr. Wilder, and Assistants. 

The fundamental theories of qualitative analysis and analyses of common cations, 
and anions by semi-micro methods. 

346. Elements of Organic Chemistry. (For agricultural and home eco- 
nomics students). Four lectures or recitations and one laboratory period. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 22, or with consent of the Head of the Department. 
Breakage deposit, $5. Conner Hall. Mr. Buess, Mr. Coggin, Mr. Philbrook, 
Mr. Wilder, and Assistants. 

A brief introduction to alipatic organic chemistry. 

347h. Agricultural Organic Chemistry. 3 hours. (For Veterinary or 
Pre-veterinary students only). Two lectures or recitations and one labora- 
tory period. Breakage deposit, $5. Prerequisite: Chemistry 346. (This 
course will not satisfy the University of Georgia requirements of organic 
chemistry for premedical students.) Mr. Buess, Mr. Coggin, Mr. Philbrook, 
Mr. Scott, or Mr. Wilder. 

A continuation of Chemistry 346, dealing primarily with the coal tar products and 
an amplification of carbohydrates, oils, fats and proteins. 

380. Quantitative Inorganic Analysis. Two lectures and three three-hour 
laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 23. Breakage deposit, $5. Mr. 
Spell, Mr. Whitehead, and Assistants. 

The fundamental theories of quantitative analysis and typical analyses involving 
volumetric and gravimetric methods. 

449. Introduction to Research (Biochemical). One lecture and four li- 
brary or laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Chemistry 451 or 452. Breakage 
deposit, $5. Conner Hall. Mr. Coggin. 

An introduction to the literature of chemistry, research procedures and directions 
which can be found only in original articles. 

451-452. Physiological Chemistry. Four lectures or recitations and one 
laboratory period. Prerequisites: 451 — Chemistry 346 and a course in Botany 
or Biology or Zoology or Animal Husbandry or Poultry Husbandry. 452 — 
Chemistry 451. Breakage deposit, $10 ($5 each course). Conner Hall. Mr. 
Coggin. 

451. Fundamental principles of physiological chemistry in the animal body, includ- 
ing the chemistry of foods, digestion, metabolism and excretions. 452. The metabolism 
of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. 

453. Phytochemistry. Four lectures or recitations and one laboratory 
period. Prerequisite: Chemistry 347h or 340b, and one course in Botany. 
Breakage deposit, $5. Conner Hall. Mr. Coggin. 

A study of the compounds and chemical principles encountered in plants. 

460, 461. Agricultural Quantitative Analysis. One lecture or recitation 
and four laboratory periods per week each quarter. Prerequisites: 460 — 
Chemistry 380; 461 — Chemistry 460. Breakage deposit, $5 for each course. 
Conner Hall. Mr. Wilder. 

Analysis of dairy products; feeds and feedstuff s; fertilizers, and insecticides; meth- 
ods of soil and water analysis. 

468. Microchemical Analysis of Soils. Five lectures, recitations, or lab- 
oratory periods. Prerequisites: Chemistry 346 and Agronomy 10. Breakage 
deposit, $5. Conner Hall. Mr. Wilder or Mr. Giddens. 

Methods of soil sampling and tests employed for the determination of some water- 
soluble cations and anions most frequently found in soils. 



258 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

(Peabody Hall, North Campus) 

The courses offered in this department prepare men to be teachers of 
vocational agriculture. Major students in this department have a broad 
training in agriculture, and, upon the satisfactory completion of the train- 
ing program outlined, are qualified for certification by the State Department 
of Education as teachers of agriculture. The program for training teachers 
of agriculture is carried on in cooperation with the College of Education 
through its Division of Vocational Education. 

In addition to the opportunities for teaching vocational agriculture, grad- 
uates who have majored in this department are in demand as teachers in 
the Veterans Farm Training Program. 

During one quarter of the senior year, each student does apprentice teach- 
ing in a selected off-campus rural school for which fifteen quarter hours of 
credit are given. The apprenticeship method of training teachers of agricul- 
ture has been used since 1928. This system of training enables the apprentice 
to deal first-hand with the many problems of a teacher of agriculture in a 
normal situation under the careful supervision of the regular teacher of 
agriculture and a member of the staff at the University. 

CONCENTRATION IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Major: 

Education 335.1, 336.1, 346.1, 347.1, 348.1 25 Hours 

Science Selections: 

Bacteriology 350, Plant Pathology 353, Veterinary Hygiene 200, 
Plant Pathology 358, Zoology 374, Mathematics 356, Chemis- 
try 346 „~ 20 Hours 

First Minor: 

Education 303 and 304 10 Hours 

Second Minor: 

Two courses in any technical department of the College of Ag- 
riculture with approval of adviser 10 Hours 

Special Requirements: 

Education 349, Food Processing 363, Animal Husbandry 373, 
Agricultural Engineering 203, Agricultural Economics 301 25 Hours 

COURSES IN THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION FOR 
MAJORS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

303. Individual Analysis and Professional Planning. Mr. Hudgins and 
selected members of the staff. 

Through a full program of testing and counseling, students will make a syste- 
matic study of their needs in relation to personal and professional development. 
Study habits will be analyzed and guidance will be given in improving study habits 
and in budgeting of time. Opportunities will be provided for students to study the 
duties and responsibilities of teachers working in the total school program. Students 
will be expected to choose a teaching field and to plan a professional program in 
terms of this choice. 

304. Educational Psychology. Mr. Garrison and selected members of the 
staff. 

Special emphasis in this course is placed upon developing competencies on the part 
of prospective elementary and high school teachers in understanding and applying 
the psychological principles involved in the growth and development of children. The 
Demonstration School will be used for studying and analyzing methods which children 
use in solving problems of behavior and learning. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 2j>9 

335.1. Curriculum Planning. Prerequisites: Education 303 and consent 
of instructor. Mr. Bryant, Mr. O'Kelley and Mr. Tolbert. 

The purpose of this course is to develop the ability of students to engage in cur- 
ricular activities in vocational agriculture in the public schools. Emphasis is placed 
on the procedures for locating, organizing, and summarizing data concerning social 
and agricultural problems to serve as a guide in formulating curricular activities 
with high school and adult groups based upon their needs and interests. Directed 
observation will be carried on in the University Demonstration School and other 
selected schools. 

336.1. Teaching Procedures. Prerequisites: Education courses 303, 304, 
335.1, and consent of instructor. Mr. Bryant, Mr. O'Kelley and Mr. Tolbert. 

The purpose of this course is to evaluate teaching procedures used by teachers of 
vocational agriculture in the public schools. Attention is given to techniques used 
in teaching vocational agriculture to high school and adult groups. The University 
Demonstration School and other selected schools will be used for observation of 
high school and adult groups. 

346.1, 347.1, 348.1. Apprentice Teaching. 15 hours. Prerequisites: Edu- 
cation 303, 304, 335.1 and 336.1. Mr. Bryant, Mr. O'Kelley, and Mr. Tolbert. 

Prospective teachers of vocational agriculture are placed as apprentices in care- 
fully selected schools of the state for an entire quarter — (approximately 12 weeks). 
During this period they are carefully supervised in dealing with the problems of 
teaching vocational agriculture. 

349. Seminar in Education. Prerequisite: Apprentice Teaching. Mr. 
O'Kelley and Mr. Tolbert. 

This is a seminar dealing with problems emerging from experiences in apprentice 
teaching. Emphasis will be placed upon the planning of a total school program, and 
the placing and responsibility of the teacher in the school. Special attention will 
be given to the work of the public schools in relation to the needs and interests of 
the community, the nation, and the world. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

W-760. Education Planning and Development. Prerequisites: Four 
courses in education and consent of the instructor. College of Education 
Staff. 

The primary purpose of this course is to prepare selected school personnel for 
participating in programs of educational planning and development. The participants 
will have an opportunity to formulate plans for carrying on educational development 
programs at the local school and county level. The total program of the school 
will be critically examined and procedures developed for enlisting teachers and lay- 
men in planning a more adequate educational program to meet the needs of the 
people. A critical examination will be made of the literature and experiences of 
planning groups in America and other parts of the world. 

771. Teaching Procedures in Vocational Education. Prerequisites: four 
courses in education and consent of the instructor. Mr. Tolbert and Staff. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of those teachers of vocational agricul- 
ture who desire guidance in improving teaching procedures. Consideration is given 
to the development of curricula based on the needs and interests of students, the 
organization of the curricula into teaching units, and the planning of units for 
instruction, teaching, and evaluation. 

772. Evaluation in Vocational Education. Prerequisites: four courses 
in education and consent of the instructor. Mr. O'Kelley and Mr. Tolbert. 

This course has the following purposes: (1) to guide teachers, supervisors, and 
administrators to develop the ability to evaluate departments and programs of voca- 
tional education in schools and communities. (2) to guide teachers in the develop- 
ment of methods and techniques for evaluating their own instruction, and (3) to 
guide teachers planning techniques for teaching student development. 

773. Supervision of Vocational Teaching. Prerequisites: four courses in 
education and consent of the instructor. Mr. O'Kelley and Mr. Tolbert. 

In this course major emphasis is placed upon the following: (1) developing a point 
of view of philosophy of teacher education, (2) analyzing the present teacher train- 
ing program in vocational education in Georgia to discover problem situations that 
may be used as a basis for teacher education programs, and (3) determining the 
relative emphasis for each teacher-training agency to place upon the solution of the 
several problems in the teacher-education program. 

871. Adult Education. Prerequisites: four courses in education and con- 
sent of the instructor. Mr. O'Kelley and Mr. Tolbert. 

The primary purposes of this course are: (1) to develop a philosophy of adult 
education. (2) to develop techniques for discovering adult problems, and (3) to dis- 
cover and apply appropriate methods of organizing and teaching adult groups. The 
course is designed to meet the needs of experienced teachers, rural school super- 
visors and administrators, and other adult leaders. 



260 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

873. Problems in Vocational Education. Prerequisites: four courses in 
education and consent of the instructor. Mr. O'Kelley and Mr. Tolbert. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of experienced teachers of agriculture 
who had their professional training outside the state and teachers who desire to secure 
additional training in specific problems of teaching. The course is planned so that 
students may work at their special interests individually or in groups. 

921. Laboratory in Applied Education. Prerequisites: four courses in 
education and consent of major professor. College of Education Staff. 

This course is designed to provide opportunities for advanced students to under- 
take functional studies of topics or problems in education significantly related to 
their professional tasks. For most students, it will involve supervised field work 
in the attempt to solve one or more practical school problems related to their normal 
duties. 

BOTANY 

(Baldwin Hall, North Campus) 

Head: Westfall. Staff: Beck, Carlton, Duncan, Jacobs, Wilson. 

21. Elementary Botany. Three one-hour lecture periods and two two- 
hour laboratory periods. Mr. Carlton and the Staff. 

A study of (a) the structure of leaves, stems, and roots; (b) growth and nutritive 
processes of plants; and (c) the relations of plants to their environment. 

22. Elementary Botany (continued). Three one-hour lecture periods and 
two two-hour laboratory periods. Mr. Carlton and the Staff. 

A study of reproduction, variation, heredity, and evolution of seed plants, with 
studies of representatives of the other major plant groups and their importance. 

305. Identification of Flowering Plants. Five double laboratory periods 
or field trips. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22. 

Studies in the identification of plants with emphasis on local flowering plants and 
their relationships. 

323. Elementary Plant Anatomy. Five two-hour laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Botany 21-22. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems of vascular plants, and 
a comparative study of the structure of roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. 

358. Methods in Plant Histology. Five double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Botany 21-22. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, staining, and 
mounting plant materials for microscopic study. 

375. Plant Ecology. Five double laboratory-discussion periods and field 
trips. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22. 

The relation of plants and plant communities to the environment in which they 
grow. 

380. Plant Physiology. Five double laboratory periods. Prerequisites: 
Botany 21-22. Breakage deposit, $2.50. 

A survey of physiological processes occurring in economic plants and the conditions 
which affect these processes. 

431. Morphology of Seed Plants. Five double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Botany 323 and one other senior division course in botany or 
plant pathology. 

Critical studies of representative seed plants, considering their development and re- 
lationships. 

440. Cytology (See Biology 440). 
442. Cytogenetics (See Biology 442). 

471. Taxonomy of Seed Plants. Five double laboratory periods. Prere- 
quisites: Botany 305 and any other senior division course in botany or ap- 
proved course in plant pathology, forestry, or geography. 

A study of the concepts and system of classification, problems of nomenclature, 
and the taxonomy of specialized groups. 

472. Taxonomy of Seed Plants (continued). Two lectures and three 
double laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Botany 471. 

A continuation of Botany 471. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 2_6T 

473. Agrostology. Five double laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Botany 
21-22 and two senior division courses in botany, or approved courses in plant 
pathology, agronomy, or forestry. 

A study of the grasses with emphasis on structure, classification, and ecological 
relationships. 

482. Nutrition of Green Plants. Two lectures and three double labora- 
tory periods. Prerequisites: Botany 323 and 380. Breakage deposit, $5. 

A study of the nutrition of the higher plants, including major and minor elements 
and deficiency symptoms. 

483. Advanced Plant Physiology. Five double laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisites: Botany 380 and any other senior division course in botany, chem- 
istry, or plant pathology. Breakage deposit, $5. 

An evaluation of accepted concepts in plant physiology with special attention to 
the methods employed in arriving at these concepts. 

802 and 804. Problems in Botany. 5 hours for each course. Under this 
heading work may be pursued under the direction of staff members in plant 
anatomy, plant ecology, plant morphology, plant physiology, plant taxonomy, 
or mycology. Prerequisite: two senior division courses in botany or ap- 
proved courses in agriculture, geography, or forestry. 

BIOLOGY (ENTOMOLOGY) 

(Baldwin Hall, North Campus) 

PROGRAM FOR MAJOR IN ENTOMOLOGY 

It is generally recognized that a thorough knowledge of insect control is 
necessary for the successful growing of either farm plants or farm animals 
and should, therefore, be a part of the training of all agricultural personnel. 
In addition many positions in teaching, research, control, and extension ento- 
mology exist in colleges and universities, experiment stations, state depart- 
ments of entomology, the United States Department of Agriculture, the 
United States Public Health Service, and in various private concerns doing 
pest control or insecticide compounding or manufacturing. Advanced study 
leading to advanced degrees and to higher teaching and research positions 
is also available. 

Students who specialize in entomology receive training in the identifica- 
tion of insects and the damage they cause, their structure, habits, and control. 

Major: Four senior division courses in Biology (Entomology), 

three of which must be chosen from Biology (Entomology) 373, 

374, 376, 477 20 Hours 

Agricultural Science Selection From: Bacteriology 350, Chemis- 
try 346, Mathematics 356, Plant Pathology 353, Plant Pathology 
358 or Biology 370, Zoology 25-26 20 Hours 

First Minor _ __ 10 Hours 

To be approved by Head of Department. 
Second Minor .. 10 Hours 

Must be in College of Agriculture. 

Electives 30 Hours 

To be chosen with the objective of obtaining information that 
will contribute most to economic gains through insect control, 
and to be approved by the major professor. 

BIOLOGY 

373. General Entomology. Three lectures and two double laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Zoology 25 and 26. Mr. Paul. 

A field and laboratory study of the structure, biology, and classification of insects 
and of their general importance and significance to man. 



262 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

374. Economic Entomology. Three lectures and two double laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Two courses in human biology, botany, or equiva- 
lent. Mr. Paul. 

A course designed to provide the practical information essential for the recognition 
and control of the insect pests most commonly encountered in the field, orchard, 
garden, woodlot, and home. 

375. Forest Entomology. Three lectures and two double laboratory peri- 
ods. Mr. Lund. 

A study of the biology, identification, and control of the species of insects de- 
structive to American forests. 

376. Medical Entomology. Three lectures and two double laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Zoology 25 and 26. Mr. Lund. 

A study of the biology, identification, and control of the species of insects and 
related arthropods of particular importance in the cause or transmission of diseases 
of man and the lower animals. 

473. Advanced General Entomology. Three lectures and two double lab- 
oratory periods. Prerequisite: Zoology 373. For graduate credit, one addi- 
tional senior division course is required. Mr. Lund. 

An advanced treatment of general entomology including biological nomenclature, 
insect evolution and classification, sensory physiology, and other special topics. 

474. Advanced Economic Entomology. Three lectures and two double lab- 
oratory periods. Prerequisite: one of the following zoology courses: 373, 
374, 375, or 376. For graduate credit, one additional senior division course 
is required. Mr. Paul. 

An advanced treatment of economic entomology including actual field work in 
experimental methods, biological control, and the insect transmission of plant 
diseases. 

477. Chemistry and Toxicology of Insecticides and Fungicides. Three 
lectures and two double laboratory periods. Prerequisites: one course in or- 
ganic chemistry and one of the following zoology courses: 373, 374, 375, or 
376. For graduate credit, one additional senior division course is required. 
Mr. Paul. 

A study of the physical and chemical behavior of insecticides, and accessory ma- 
terials and of their toxicological effects upon plants and animals. 

805. Insect Parasites. Prerequisites: Zoology 376 and one additional 
senior division course in zoology. Mr. Lund. 

An advanced study of the structure, life-histories, and identification of those insects 
and related arthropods which cause or transmit disease in man or lower animals. 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

(Barrow Hall, South Campus) 

The four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agricultural Engineering has been planned to give its graduates training 
in the fundamental subjects of science and engineering, with basic training 
in agriculture, and a -specialized study of subjects involving the application 
of engineering knowledge to agricultural problems. 

The Division offers major work for the degree of Master of Science 
in Agricultural Engineering and minor work to students taking major work 
in other departments. Prerequisite to major graduate work is the comple- 
tion of a standard curriculum in agricultural engineering substantially 
equivalent to that required of undergraduates at this institution. 

Occupations open to graduates are, briefly: teaching, experiment station 
work, extension work with colleges and federal agencies; engineering work 
in soil conservation, such as drainage, irrigation, land clearing, and erosion 
control; advertising, sales, and production work with manufacturers of 
farm machinery and equipment, and building materials; engineering man- 
agement and development in rural electrification; editorial work on farm 
and trade journals; appraisal and consultation; and farming. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



263 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



Fall 



Hour: 



Engr. Drawing, A.E. 4.... 3 
Inorg. Chem., 

Chem. 21 5 

Composition, Eng 2x 5 

Algebra, Math lOlx 5 

Mil. Science 1 or 

Air Science 5 2 

Physical Education 



20 



Fall 

Surveying, A.E. 11 5 

Math. 354 5 

Physics 28 5 

Mil Science 2 or 

Air Science 6 ._ 2 

Physical Education 



17 



Fall 

Mechanics, A.E. 250 5 

Thermo., A.E. 273 5 

Mat. of Const.. A.E. 253.. 5 
Elective 3 



18 



Fall 

D. C. Mach., A.E. 284. 3 

Sanit. & Water 

Sup., A.E. 272 .. ___ 2 

Soil & Water Cons., 

A E 225 5 

Farm' Mach., Xe. 26l"~" 5 
Elective 3 



Freshman 
Winter 

Hours 
Engr. Drawing, A.E. 5__ 3 
Inor. Chem., 
Chem. 22 5 

Composition, Eng. 2y 5 

Trigonometry, 

Math. lOly 5 

Mil. Science or 

Air Science 2 

Physical Education 

20 

Sophomore 

Winter 

Crops, Agron. 1 5 

Math. 355 5 

Physics 27 5 

Mil. Science or 

Air Science 2 

Physical Education 



Junior 
Winter 



17 



Mechanics, A.E. 251 5 

Heat & Refr., A.E. 274... 5 

Hydraulics, A.E. 256 5 

Electives 3 



Senior 
Winter 

A. C. Mach., A.E. 286 
Farm Motors, A.E. 262. 
Farm Structures, 

A.E. 271 - 

Elective 



18 



Spring 

Hours 

Desc. Geom., A.E. 8 3 

Botany 21 5 

Composition, Eng .6 5 

Anal. Geom., Math. 110.... 5 
Mil. Science or 

Air Science 1 

Physical Education 



19 



Spring 

Soils. Agron. 10 5 

An. Hus. 1 or Dairy 3 3 

Physics 329 5 

Engr. Shop., A.E. 2 3 

Mil. Science or 

Air Science 1 

Physical Education 

17 



Spring 

Stren. of Mat. 

A.E. 255 

Heat Processes, 

A.E. 275 

Soil Physics, Agr. 
Elective 



Spring 

Rural Elect., A.E. 289 5 

Engr. Org., A.E. 291 5 

Ag. Ec. 301 or 304 5 

Elective 3 



18 18 18 

Total requirements, 208 hours, exclusive of the required courses in Military 
Science 1-2 or Air Science 5-6 and Physical Education 1-2. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



2. Engineering Shop. 3 hours. Two three-hour laboratory periods only. 
Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 8. Mr. Harris. 

Machine tool work, oxy-acetylene and electric welding, carpentry. For B.S.A.E. 
students only. 

4-5. Engineering Drawing. 6 hours (3 hours a quarter). Three labora- 
tory periods only. Mr. Cross. 

Use of drawing instruments, lettering, detailing, orthographic and pictorial meth- 
ods of presentation. 

6. Topography Drawing. 3 hours. Two three-hour laboratory periods 
only. Mr. Cross. 

Use of drawing instruments, lettering, sketching, symbols, charts, contours, topogra- 
phic maps. For B.S.A. and B.S.F. students. 

8. Descriptive Geometry. 3 hours. Three laboratory periods only. Pre- 
requisite: Agricultural Engineering 5. Mr. Cross. 

Representation of geometrical magnitudes by means of points, lines, planes and 
solids and their application in the solution of problems. 



264 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

11. Surveying. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Trigonometry. 
The use, care, and adjustment of surveying instruments and equipment. Field 
problems in leveling, land measuring, and topographic surveying. 

20. Soil and Water Conservation. 3 hours. One laboratory period. Mr. 
Cobb. 

Principles and methods of soil and water conservation with special emphasis given 
to terracing and gulley control. For B.S.A. students. 

61. Agricultural Machines. 3 hours. One laboratory period. Mr. Drew. 
Selection, operation, care, and economic application of crop production, harvesting, 

and processing machinery. For B.S.A. students. 

62. Gas Engines and Tractors. 3 hours. One laboratory period. Mr. 
Drew. 

Principles of operation, maintenance, repair, and application of gas engines and 
tractors. For B.S.A. students. 

70. Farm Building and Equipment. 3 hours. Mr. Hudson and Mr. Cross. 
A study of farm buildings and equipment with special regard to livestock require- 
ments, economy, convenience, sanitation, and materials. For B.S.A. students. 

203. Farm Shop. 6 hours. Four three-hour laboratory periods only. Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 24. Mr. Harris. 

Farm construction methods — carpentry, concrete, soldering, blacksmithing, welding, 
pipe fitting, and repair of farm machinery. For Agricultural Education majors. 

207. Advanced Farm Shop. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engi- 
neering 203. Mr. Harris. 

Organization, management, equipment, facilities, and techniques for conducting 
classes in farm shop. For Agricultural Education majors. 

225. Soil and Water Conservation. One laboratory period. Prerequisite: 
Agricultural Engineering 256. Mr. Cobb. 

Engineering aspects of soil erosion and its control, principles, and methods of 
drainage and irrigation. 

226. Conservation Practices. 3 hours. One laboratory period. Prere- 
quisite: Agricultural Engineering 20. Mr. Cobb. 

The planning and design of water disposal systems and the study of recent ex- 
periment station results as applied to conservation farming. For Soil Conservation 
majors. 

250-251. Mechanics. 10 hours (5 hours a quarter). Prerequisite: Physics 
27. Mr. Brown. 

The statics and dynamics of engineering. 

253. Materials of Construction. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 
250. Mr. Hudson. 

Manufacture, properties, uses, and application of materials for engineering con- 
struction. 

255. Strength of Materials. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 251. 
Mr. Hudson. 

Elements of stress analysis, resistance, and design as applied to engineering ma- 
terials and structures. 

256. Hydraulics. Prerequisite: Calculus. Mr. Cobb. 

Fundamental principles of hydrostatics and hydrodynamics applied to the flow 
of water through orifices, over weirs, through pipes and channels. 

261. Farm Machinery. One laboratory period. Prerequisite: Physics 27. 
Mr. Drew. 

Development, design, and utilization of farm machinery for all forms of farm 
power. 

262. Farm Motors. One laboratory period. Prerequisite: Agricultural 
Engineering 270. Mr. Drew. 

Thermodynamic principles, design, operation, rating, testing, and application of 
tractors, trucks, and engines for agricultural uses. 

271. Farm Structures. Three laboratory periods. Prerequisites: Agri- 
cultural Engineering 253 and 255. Mr. Hudson. 

Design, details of construction, valuation and appraisal, specifications, bills of ma- 
terials, and cost estimates. 

272. Farm Sanitation and Water Supply. 2 hours. Prerequisite: Agri- 
cultural Engineering 256. Mr. Hudson. 

Development, storage, distribution, and purification of rural water supplies, and 
the collection and disposal of farm and rural wastes. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 2_6_5 

273. Thermodynamics. Prerequisites: Calculus and Physics 28. Mr. Rod- 
gers. 

The properties and fundamental equations of gases, vapor energy transformations, 
heat cycles, compressors and engines. 

274. Heating and Refrigeration. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 
273. Mr. Rodgers. 

Heat transfer, heating, cooling, ventilation, refrigeration. 

275. Heat Processes and Equipment. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engi- 
neering 274. Mr. Rodgers. 

Design and selection of heating and refrigeration equipment primarily for pro- 
cessing of agricultural products. 

280. Farm Electrification. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 20. Mr. Ein- 
ard. 

Application of fundamental physical principles in farm wiring and in the use of 
electrical power and equipment for farm operations. For B.S.A. students. 

284. Direct Current Machinery. 3 hours. One three-hour laboratory 
period. Prerequisite: Physics 329. Mr. Brown. 

A study of the laws and phenomena of electricity and their applications to motors, 
generators, transformers, distribution, and utilization. 

286. Alternating Current Machinery. One three-hour laboratory period. 
Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 284. Mr. Brown. 

Principles of design, construction, and operation of alternating current machines. 

288. Rural Electrification. 5 hours. One laboratory period. Prerequi- 
site: Agricultural Engineering 286. Mr. Kinard. 

A study of the problems involved in the distribution and application of electricity 
to agriculture. 

291. Engineering Organization and Administration. Prerequisite: Any 
two senior courses in Applied Agricultural Engineering. Mr. Driftmier and 
Staff. 

Professional and public relations: ethics; federal, state and industrial organiza- 
tion, procedures, contractual relatives, analysis of engineering projects. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

601. Agricultural Engineering Applications. Prerequisites: Agricultural 
Engineering 203 and Education 336, or Plant Pathology 353 and Animal 
Husbandry 382, or equivalent. Mr. Harris. 

The application of engineering techniques to agricultural production and utiliza- 
tion practices. 

602. Advanced Engineering Applications. Prerequisite: Agricultural En- 
gineering 601. Mr. Harris. 

Implementation and continuation of farm shop improvement plans developed in 
Agricultural Engineering 601. At least 40 hours will be devoted to group meetings 
dealing with improvement practices. The remainder of time will be devoted to im*- 
provement of the registrants' shop under direct supervision of the instructor. 

804. Special Electrical Problems. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineer- 
ing 288, or equivalent. Mr. Kinard and Mr. Brown. 

Formation and solution of theoretical problems connected with electrical circuits, 
apparatus, machines, or systems. 

805. Farm Structures. Prerequisites: Agricultural Engineering 271 and 
272, or equivalent. Mr. Hudson. 

Problems in farm structures, water supply, sanitation, heating, lighting, ventila- 
tion, and home equipment. 

806. Farm Power and Machinery. Prerequisites: Agricultural Engineer- 
ing 261 and 262, or equivalent. Mr. Drew. 

Problems in design, testing and determining efficiency of farm implements and 
machines; power problems in application, efficiency, and economy. 

807. Soil and Water Conservation. Prerequisites: Agricultural Engineer- 
ing 225 and 256, or equivalent. Mr. Cobb. 

Studies of water control through drainage: the conservation of soils by the control 
of soil erosion: land clearing. 



266 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

808. Agricultural Engineering Research. 20 hours. Prerequisite: B.S. 
Degree in Agricultural Engineering; offered when demand warrants by au- 
thorized members of the Agricultural Engineering Staff. 

Original investigation of an approved problem in some phase of agricultural engi- 
neering, farm power and machinery, rural electrification, farm structures and utili- 
ties, soil and water conservation, or processing of farm products. 

840. Experimental Engineering. Prerequisites: Agricultural Engineering 
286 and Physics 329 or equivalent. Mr. Kinard and the Staff. 

Organization, planning, and execution of engineering research. Construction, ad- 
justment, application, and use of measuring instruments and devices. 

930. Thesis. 5 to 50 hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

(Landscape Architecture Building, North Campus) 

Landscape Architecture is defined as the art of arranging land and the 
objects upon it for human use and enjoyment. The curriculum in landscape 
architecture is a practical program based on the requirements in profes- 
sional education of the American Society of Landscape Architects leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture. 

A series of formal and naturalistic developments, known as the Founders 
Memorial Garden, surrounds the Landscape Architecture Building. This 
affords excellent laboratory facilities for the students. 

The University of Georgia is especially well suited for teaching landscape 
architecture because of the wide variety of available plant material, a long 
growing season, and its accessibility to numerous landscape and architectural 
developments in the Southeast. 

TRIPS 

A trip of a week's extent will be taken on alternate years by freshman and 
sophomore landscape architecture majors to Flat Rock and Asheville, N. C, 
Smoky Mountain National Park, and to Thomasville, Georgia, and points 
in Florida for purpose of study and observation. Week-end trips will be 
made to Augusta, Atlanta, and LaGrange, Georgia, and to Aiken and Charles- 
ton, South Carolina. Each trip is made at the expense of the student. 

PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 

1. General Program in Landscape Atchitecture. This program, leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, is intended to fit stu- 
dents for the professional practice of landscape architecture. 

2. Program in Recreational Planning. This is a program leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture devoted particularly 
to the design and management of large recreational areas and forest pre- 
serves. Following the close of the junior year a summer camp covering a 
period of ten weeks is required as a prerequisite for graduation. 

3. Program in Garden Design. This program for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Landscape Architecture is set up to give intensive study of 
the problems of design, management, and maintenance of flower gardens, 
home grounds, and estates. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



267 



THE FOLLOWING CORE CURRICULUM IS REQUIRED OF ALL STU- 
DENTS MAJORING IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE: 



Freshman 

Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 

Math. lOly 5 

Land. Arch. 55, 56 _ 10 

Land. Arch. 72 5 

Physical Science 1-2 10 

Art 20 5 

Land. Arch. 101 5 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 
Physical Education 1 (for men) 

or 
Physical Education (for women).... 5 



Sophomore 

Hours 

English 22x 5 

Botany 21-22 10 

Horticulture 1 5 

Land. Arch. 12-13-14 15 

Agricultural Engineering 11 5 

Land. Arch. 102 5 

Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 
Physical Education 2 (for men) 

or 
Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 



55 



50 



BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



GENERAL PROGRAM 



Summer Term 



History 110 x-y 10 

Political Science 1 5 

Practical Experience 

1 summer 1 

Field Trips 

4 at % hr. each 2 

Junior 

Hours 

Land. Arch. 315-316-317 15 

Land. Arch. 303 5 

Art 221 or 241 5 

Land. Arch. 350-358 ..10 



Senior 



Land. Arch 

Land. Arch 

Land. Arch 

Land. Arch 

Land. Arch 
Art 241 or 2: 

Land. Arch 



318-319-355 ...... 

354 


Hours 

15 

5 


360 ... 


5 


358 


5 


353 


5 


21 


5 


340 


3 



Land. Arch. 351-352 



.10 



45 



43 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 
2. RECREATIONAL PLANNING 



Junior 

Hours 

History 110 x-y 10 

Political Science 1 5 

Forestry 83-84 6 

Forestry 356 3 

Land. Arch. 315-316-317 15 

Land. Arch. 350 5 



Senior 



Land. 


Arch. 
Arch. 
Arch. 
Arch. 
Arch. 
Arch. 
Arch. 


351-352 


Hours 
10 


Land. 


353 


.. .. ... 5 


Land. 


354 


5 


Land. 


355 


5 


Land. 


357 


. 5 


Land. 


358 


5 


Land. 


390 


5 



Field Trips 
4 at % hr. each 



44 40 

Summer Camp 
. 2 Forestry 30 15 



268 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

3. GARDEN DESIGN 
Junior Senior 

Hours Hours 

History 110 x-y 10 Land. Arch. 352 5 

Horticulture 1 5 Land. Arch. 354-364 10 

Land. Arch. 301 5 Land. Arch. 355 5 

Land. Arch. 315-316 10 Art 389 or 242 _ 5 

Land. Arch. 321 3 Art 390 or 391 5 

Land. Arch. 351 5 Electives 10 

Land. Arch. 358 5 Political Science 5 5 

~— 45 

46 Field Trips 

4 at y 2 hr. each 2 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

(Landscape Architecture Building, North Campus) 

12. Introductory Landscape Design. Five laboratory periods. Mr. Wig- 
ginton. 

Application of theories of design to small properties with special emphasis on the 
historic precedents in landscape design. Introduction to rendering. 

13. Introductory Landscape Design. Five laboratory periods. Mr. Taylor. 
A continuation of the study of small properties introducing elements of grading 

and drainage as they influence design. 

14. Introductory Landscape Design. Five laboratory periods. Mr. Wig- 
ginton. 

Continuing the study of small properties with au analysis of the design relation- 
ship of indoor and outdoor aspects of contemporary living. 

55. Architectural Drafting. Five laboratory periods. Mr. Taylor. 

A condensed course in principles of orthographic projection, isometric and perspec- 
tive. Emphasis is placed on use of instruments, lettering and problems in design. 

56. Architectural Projections. Five laboratory periods. Prerequisite: 
Landscape Architecture 55. Mr. Wigginton. 

Shades and shadows and presentation drawings in isometric projection and per- 
spective. 

72. History of Landscape Design. Five lecture periods. Mr. Owens. 

Deals with the gradual development of the art of landscape design from the 
earliest efforts to the present day, laying special stress upon the transition of styles 
and the development of the naturalistic type. 

101. Fundamentals of Architecture. Five laboratory periods. Mr. Tay- 
lor. 

Lectures on organization of living functions and their expression in plan and ele- 
vation together with studies in orientation and site planning. Exercises in freehand 
three dimensional presentation. 

102. Introductory Architectural Design. Five laboratory periods. Mr. 
Taylor. 

Study of small buildings commonly dealt with in landscape design and their appro- 
priate expression in wood frame and masonry construction. Elementary problems in 
plan elevation and section. 

303. Architectural Design. Five laboratory periods. Mr. Taylor. 

Continuation of design problems with analysis of larger architectural plans, 
especially organization of public buildings in relation to landscape factors of site 
and orientation. 

313. Landscape Design. Five laboratory periods. Especially designed for 
students not majoring in landscape architecture. 

Problems in design involving the designing and rendering of plans for gardens, 
residential properties, grounds of public buildings and parks. 

315. Intermediate Landscape Design. Four laboratory periods and one 
lecture. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture 12. Mr. Wigginton and Mr. 
Taylor. 

Application of design theory to residential properties. Original problems in design, 
rendering, and model making. 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 2_6_9 

316. Intermediate Landscape Design. Four laboratory periods and one 
lecture. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture 315. Mr. Owens and Mr. 
Taylor. 

Solution of original problems in public and semi-public properties and recreational 
facilities. 

317. Intermediate Landscape Design. Four laboratory periods and one 
lecture. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture 316. Mr. Wigginton. 

Solution of original problems in public and semi-public properties such as ceme- 
teries, school grounds, subdivisions and golf courses. 

318. Advanced Landscape Design. Four laboratory periods and one lec- 
ture. Prerequisite: Landscape Architecture 317. Mr. Wigginton. 

A continuation of intermediate landscape design involving complex problems. 

319. Advanced Landscape Design. Five laboratory periods. 

A continuation of Landscape Architecture 318 with original design problems in 
large landscape developments. 

321. The Maintenance of Ornamental Plantings and Landscape Manage- 
ment. (Horticulture). 3 hours. Prerequisite: Horticulture 1. Mr. Bowden 
and Mr. Wigginton. 

Formulation and study of a work program which considers those essential opera- 
tions contributing to the successful landscape management of grounds. Methods of 
maintaining lawns, hedges, perennial and annual beds and borders, walks, pools, 
trees, specimen plants and other ornamental plantings. 

340. Professional Practice in Landscape Architecture. 3 hours. Three 
lectures. Mr. Owens. 
Professional practice and ethics: contracts, reports and specifications. 

350. Elementary Construction. Mr. Wigginton. 

Materials of landscape construction, their characteristics and uses; elementary- 
grading plans and simple construction details. 

351. Plant Materials. Mr. Owens. 

A study of plant materials used in landscape architecture, dealing with trees and 
shrubs. 

352. Plant Materials. Three laboratory periods. Mr. Owens. 

A study of plant materials used in landscape architecture, dealing with flowers, 
perennials, and grasses. 

353. City Planning. Three laboratory periods and two lectures. Mr. 
Taylor. 

Background course in city planning, covering the history and bibliography of the 
subject, and introducing the student to modern trends in planning. Designed as a 
foundation for further study of professional planning, the course is also an elective 
intended to provide the layman with an informed understanding of civic problems. 

354. Planting Design. Five lecture or laboratory periods. Prerequisites: 
Landscape Architecture 317, 351, and 352. Mr. Owens. 

Deals with problems which aim to train the student to produce with plants and 
other landscape materials practical and aesthetically effective results. 

355. Landscape Thesis. Five lecture or laboratory periods. Prerequisite:' 
Landscape Architecture 353. Mr. Owens and Staff. 

A problem in designing a property will be assigned: completed plans including 
general plan, staking and grading plans, construction and planting plans. Specifi- 
cations and estimates will be required. This course will serve as a comprehensive 
examination. 

357. Landscape Engineering. Four laboratory periods and one lecture. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics lOly, Agricultural Engineering 11, or equivalent. 

Design, construction, and mathematical alignment of driveways and park roads; 
calculation of quantities. 

358. Landscape Construction. Mr. Wigginton. 

Design of construction problems, master plans and details, and estimating quan- 
tities. 

360. History of Architecture. Four lectures and one laboratory period. 
Mr. Taylor. 

Egyptian, Greek. Roman. Byzantine, Romanesque. Gothic, Renaissance, Tudor, 
Georgian, Early American, and Modern Architecture, with special emphasis on do- 
mestic architecture and on those styles which have been most popular in America 
for residences and public buildings. 



270 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

364. Planting Design. One lecture and four laboratory periods. Prere- 
quisite: Landscape Architecture 354. Mr. Owens. 

A continuation of Landscape Architecture 354. Emphasis is placed on the design 
and planting of perennial gardens. 

370. History and Appreciation of Landscape Architecture. Five lectures. 
Especially designed as an elective for students not majoring in landscape 
architecture. Mr. Owens. 

A study of the elements of landscape architecture. The course deals with the his- 
tory of gardening, with particular attention devoted to its development in the South, 
and the application of landscape design to outdoor areas, including the small home, 
park, cemetery, farmstead, estate, etc. 

390. Problems in Recreational Planning. Four laboratories and one lec- 
ture. 

The study and formulation of master, project, and unit recreational plans; the 
design and construction of details relating thereto. 



THE GEORGE FOSTER PEABODY SCHOOL OF 

FORESTRY 

THE FACULTY 

Donald James Weddell, B.S.F., M.S., Dean. 
Madaline Fambrough Stewart. Secretary. 



George Norman Bishop, B.S.F., M.S.F., Professor of Forest Protection. 

Walter Lonnie Chapman. B.S.F.. Assistant Extension Forester, Tifton, Geor- 
gia. 

Clarence Dorsey Dyer, B.S.F., Associate Extension Forester, Tifton Georgia. 

Bishop Franklin Grant, B.S.F., M.S.F., Professor of Forest Utilization and 
Director of the Summer Camp. 

John Robert Hamilton, B.S.F.. M.S.F., Associate Forester, Georgia Experi- 
ment Station. 

♦Leon Abraham Habgreaves, Jr.. B.S.F., M.S.F., Instructor in Forestry. 

Lyle Wendell Redverse Jackson, B.S.F., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Silvi- 
culture. 

James Hobart Jenkins. B.Sc, M.Sc, Part-time Instructor in Forestry. 

Leo Francis Labyak, B.S.F., M.F., D.F., Temporary Instructor in Forestry. 

Archie Edgar Patterson. B.S., M.S., Professor of Forest Management. 

Donald James Weddell, B.S.F., M.S., Professor of Forestry and Dean of the 
School of Forestry. 

♦Albert Cadwallader Worrell, B.S.F., M.F., Assistant Professor of Forest 
Mensuration. 

ASSOCIATE FACULTY 

William Andrew Campbell. B.S., A.M., Ph.D., Research Associate in Forest 
Pathology and U. S. Department of Agriculture Pathologist. 

Wilbur Howard Duncan, A.B.. M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Leland Overby Drew, B.S.A.E., M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural En- 
gineering and Instructor in Forest Surveying. 

Horace Odin Lund, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Entomology and Instructor 
in Forest Entomology. 

Harold Donald Morris, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agronomy 
and Instructor in Forest Soils. 

Merle Charles Prunty, Jr., B.S., A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Geogra- 
phy and Geology and Head of the Department of Geography and Geology. 



'On leave. 

[271] 



272 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

George Edward Thompson, B.S.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant 
Pathology and Plant Breeding. 

Bratislav Zak, B.S., Research Associate in Forest Pathology and U. 8. De- 
partment of Agriculture Junior Pathologist. 



Omer Clyde Aderhold, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., President of the University. 
Alvin Blocksom Biscoe, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of Faculties. 



Joseph Thomas Askew, Ph.B., M.A., LL.D., Dean of Student Affairs. 

Walter Newman Danner, Jr., B.S.A.E., M.S.A., Registrar and Director of 
Admissions. 

John Dixon Bolton, C.P.A., Comptroller and Treasurer. 



THE GEORGE FOSTER PEABODY SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 273 

SCHOOL OP FORESTRY INFORMATION 

HISTORY 

The School of Forestry was first established early in 1906 through the 
interest and generosity of Mr. George Foster Peabody who endowed it for 
a three-year period. It is the oldest forestry school in the South and one of 
the oldest in the country. In 1908, the School became a Division of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture and remained so for about twenty-seven years. In June 
1935, by action of the Board of Regents of the University System, the George 
Foster Peabody School of Forestry was reestablished. 

The many graduates of the School have played a very important part in 
the development of the forestry program in the South, serving in all phases 
of forestry work. 

BUILDINGS, EQUIPMENT, AND FOREST PROPERTIES 

The School is ideally situated for its important role as a regional school. 
Its location in the State makes it not only easily accessible to residents of 
Georgia but to those of neighboring states. It is also well located as to ac- 
cessibility to the three major forest regions of the Southeastern United 
States: Mountain, Piedmont, and Coastal Plain. 

The School is housed in its own modern building. The three-storied main 
building contains classrooms, general and research laboratories, a library 
containing 15,000 volumes and a reading room with the latest forestry peri- 
odicals available, a large auditorium, photographic darkroom, and offices. 
Two large wings attached to the main building, contain a small sawmill, 
edger, a naval stores gum cleaning plant and pilot still. 

Ample surveying, mapping, cruising, and other forestry equipment is 
owned by the School. Special research equipment for student and faculty use 
is also available. Additional research equipment and that required for ad- 
vancement in classroom techniques is purchased as the need arises. 

The forest properties owned by the University are managed by the School 
of Forestry. Two of these are located on land adjacent to the campus. 
The Oconee Forest, a typical Piedmont forest area of 120 acres, is used for 
laboratory work in silviculture, mensuration, and utilization. The Denmark 
Forest of 145 acres, adjoining the Oconee Forest, is used for experimental 
work in forest plantings. Whitehall Forest, located approximately five miles 
from the campus and comprising some 750 acres, was deeded to the Univer- 
sity by the Resettlement Administration. A series of planting demonstra- 
tions has been established on this forest, and an arboretum is being devel- 
oped. The United States Department of Agriculture, Division of Forest 
Pathology, has established a number of research plantings on this area. 
The Watson Springs Forest, given to the University by Colonel J. D. W T atson, 
is located in Greene County, about 25 miles from Athens. This forest con- 
tains some 600 acres. The Hardman Memorial Forest of 500 acres is lo- 
cated 12 miles north of Athens in Jackson County and was deeded to the 
University as a memorial to the late Governor Hardman. Problems in plant- 
ing and in the study of species not commonly planted are being carried 
out on this forest. 

The forest tree nursery located in Oconee Forest is the oldest public owned 
nursery in Georgia and probably the oldest in the South. It has recently 
been reactivated in order to carry out a research program in cooperation 
with the Georgia Forestry Commission. 

CONCENTRATION IN WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

A concentration in the field of Wildlife Management was offered for the 
first time during the year 1951-52. This program, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Forestry, Major in Wildlife Management, gives the 



274 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

student the necessary training in wildlife management as well as the funda- 
mental work in forestry. 

COOPERATING AGENCIES 

A field station of the Division of Forest Pathology of the United States 
Bureau of Plant Industry is maintained at the School of Forestry. The Staff 
members of this division are working on the causes, prevention, and possible 
cures for various tree diseases, especially those affecting this section of the 
country. This staff is also working on a study of forest tree genetics of 
southern pines. 

A branch station of the Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, formerly 
located at the School of Forestry, but now with headquarters at Macon, works 
in cooperation with the School. This station, designated as the Southern 
Piedmont Branch, is studying various silvicultural, management, and eco- 
nomic forestry problems pertaining to the Piedmont region of the South. 
Several technically trained foresters are working on these problems. 

FIELD WORK IN FORESTRY 

Field work is a very important phase of a well-rounded forestry education. 
In addition to field laboratories in connection with the various courses 
taught at the University, several field trips to other sections of the State 
are required. Also as a part of the regular program of work, a camp is 
held during the summer quarter following the sophomore year. 

DEGREES OFFERED BY SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

The School of Forestry offers the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Fores- 
try and the Bachelor of Science in Forestry, Major in Wildlife Management. 
Through the Graduate School the degrees of Master of Science in Forestry 
and Master of Forestry are offered. 

Students planning to major in Forestry should enter at the beginning of 
the freshman year, or not later than the beginning of the sophomore year. 
Because the courses are highly specialized, students entering as juniors have 
difficulty completing degree requirements in less than three additional years. 

SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the general University requirements relative to scholarship, 
the following requirement must be met by all Forestry students: 

"Any student registered in the junior and senior class of the School of 
Forestry who, at the end of the school year, does not have a weighted average 
of 70 or more in all work taken since entering the School of Forestry, will 
not be entitled to continue in attendance in the School except by special 
permission of the forestry faculty. Such permission will be granted only 
in exceptional cases." 

At least a grade of C must be earned, by School of Forestry students, in 
all required forestry courses and approved substitutes, before credit for the 
course will be given toward graduation. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Certain courses require breakage deposits varying from $10 to $25 per 
year. The amount necessary for books will vary from $15 to $30 per year. 

A fee of $10 is required for Forestry 30 and for Forestry 413. Field trips 
will form a part of certain courses in the junior and senior years, and the 
expenses of these trips, usually about $20, must be borne by the student. 



THE GEORGE FOSTER PEABQDY SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 275 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Xi Sigma Pi, the national honorary forestry fraternity, has an active 
chapter in the School of Forestry. The purpose of this fraternity is to honor 
those students who do outstanding scholastic work, to promote fraternal 
relations among earnest workers, and to work for the upbuilding of the pro- 
fession of forestry. 

Alpha Zeta, a national honorary fraternity in agricultural and allied fields, 
is open to students in the School of Forestry. 

The Forestry Club, open to all students in the School, sponsors biweekly 
programs of special interest to the student body. The club also sponsors the 
annual field day, the senior banquet, and the Cypress Knee, the Forestry 
School's annual publication. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 

The Earl Jenkins Memorial Award is given to a member of the junior 
class in Forestry who excels in scholarship, character, and interest in forestry 
ideals. This award honors the memory of Earl Jenkins, class of 1942, who 
was killed in action in World War II, and is given by his sister. 

The Xi Sigma Pi-Foresty Club Award, amounting to $10, is given to 
the outstanding freshman. 

The Dupree Barrett Loan Fund, given in memory of Dupree Barrett, 
for many years Extension Forester in Georgia, is open to junior or senior 
students in the School of Forestry. 

The Union Bag and Paper Corporation of Savannah annually awards two 
scholarships to Georgia boys, one to an outstanding 4-H Club member and 
the other to an outstanding F.F.A. member. The winners are selected by a 
committee and are judged on leadership, personality, ability, and interest in 
forestry. Those interested should contact their local club leader for specific 
information. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

A total of 207 hours, in addition to Military or Air Science and Physical 
Education, is required for graduation in either of the curricula. 

REQUIRED CURRICLULUM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY 

Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

Hours Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 Plant Pathology 354 (Forest 

Math. 101 x-y (Algebra and Pathology) 5 

Trigonometry) 10 Chemistry 21-22 (Inorganic) 10 

Geography 121 5 Forestry 83 (Dendrology) 3 

Ag. Engineering 6 Forestry 84 (Dendrology) 3 

(Topographic Drawing) 3 Agronomy 7 (Forest Soils) 5 

Political Science 1 5 Ag. Engineering 11 (Surveying) 5 

Botany 21-22 (General Botany) 10 Botany 375 (Ecology) 5 

Physics 20 5 Economics 5x (Economics) 5 

Forestry 20 (Introductory Elective 5 

Forestry) _ 1 Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 Physical Education 2 

Physical Education 1 

54 51 



276 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



Summer Camp 

Hours 
Forestry 30 (Summer Camp) „ 15 

Junior Year 

Hours 

Zoology 375 (Forest Insects) 5 

Forestry 307 (Protection) 3 

Forestry 340-341 (Mensuration) _ 6 

Forestry 356 (Silvics) 5 

Forestry 357 (Practice of Silviculture) 5 

Forestry 358 (Reforestation Practices) 3 

Forestry 359 (Regional Silviculture) 3 

Forestry 370 (Wood Anatomy) 3 

Forestry 371 (Forest Products) 3 

Forestry 390 (Forest Finance) 3 

Forestry 391 (Forest Economics) — _ 3 

Electives 8 

50 
Senior Year 

Hours 

Forestry 310 (Informational Methods in Forestry) — 3 

Forestry 320 (Forest Range Management) 3 

Forestry 342 (Mensuration) 3 

Forestry 377 (Logging) _ 3 

Forestry 378 (Lumbering) 3 

Forestry 404 (Forest Improvements) 3 

Forestry 405 (Naval Stores) 3 

Forestry 406 (Utilization Field Trip) 3 

Forestry 410 (Forest Policy) 3 

Forestry 411, 412, 413 (Forest Management) 12 

Electives 8 

47 

REQUIRED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN FORESTRY, MAJOR IN WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 



Freshman Year 

Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 

Math. 101 x-y (Algebra and 

Trigonometry ) 10 

Geography 121 —. 5 

Ag. Engineering 6 

(Topographic Drawing) 3 

Political Science 1 5 

Botany 21-22 (General Botany) .....10 

Physics 20 .. _ 5 

Forestry 20 (Introductory 

Forestry) 1 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 
Physical Education 1 



Sophomore Year 

Hours 

Chemistry 21-22 (Inorganic) 10 

Forestry 83 (Dendrology) 3 

Forestry 84 (Dendrology) 3 

Agronomy 7 (Forest Soils) 5 

Ag. Engineering 11 (Surveying) 5 

Botany 375 (Ecology) __ „_ 5 

Economics 5x (Economics) . 5 

Gen. Zoology 25-26 ..10 

Military Science 2 or 

Air Science 6 5 

Physical Education 2 



54 



51 



THE GEORGE FOSTER PEABODY SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 277 



Summer Camp 

Hours 
Forestry 30 (Summer Camp) — - 15 

Junior Year 

Hours 

Forestry 307 (Protection) __ 3 

Forestry 340-341 (Mensuration) _____ - 6 

Zoology 353 (Animal Ecology) — 5 

Forestry 356 (Silvics) 5 

Forestry 357 (Practice of Silviculture) 5 

Forestry 370 (Wood Anatomy) — 3 

Zoology 375 (Forest Insects) 5 

Zoology 381 (Ornithology) or — _ - 5 

Zoology 402 (Mammalogy) __ — - (5) 

Forestry 390 (Forest Finance) 3 

Electives - - 10 

50. 
(Suggestive electives: Field Botany; Reforestation Practices; Mammalogy 
or Ornithology). 

Senior Year 

Hours 

Forestry 310 (Informational Methods in Forestry)... 3 

Forestry 320 (Range Management) 3 

Forestry 371 (Forest Products) 3 

Forestry 377 (Logging) 3 

Forestry 385 (Game Management) 3 

Forestry 386 (Wildlife Management Techniques) 3 

Forestry 391 (Forest Economics) 3 

Forestry 404 (Improvements) ._. — - 3 

Forestry 405 (Naval Stores) 3 

Forestry 411-412-413 (Management) 12 

Electives 8 

47 
Suggested electives: Forestry 378 (Lumbering); Forestry 342 (Mensura- 
tion). 

COURSES OFFERED IN SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

(All classes except Summer Camp meet in the Forestry Building.) 

The University reserves the right to withdraw any course for which the 
registration is not sufficient and to offer courses not here listed should 
sufficient demand arise and teaching facilities and personnel be available. 

Unless otherwise indicated, all courses will meet five hours a week and 
carry five hours credit. 

2. Farm Forestry. 3 hours. Mr. Labyak. 

A general course for agricultural and vocational agricultural students dealing with 
forestry from the farmer's standpoint. 

20. Introductory Forestry. 1 hour. Mr. Weddell. 

An introductory course designed to acquaint the forestry student with the field 
of forestry. 

30. Summer Camp. 15 hours. The summer quarter following the sopho- 
more year. Eight hours a day. Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 11 
and Forestry 83-84. Fee $10. The Camp Staff. 

Field practice in general forestry. Emphasis will be placed on surveying, mensu- 
ration, and type mapping. 

83. Regional Dendrology. 3 hours. One lecture and two laboratory peri- 
ods. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22. Mr. Bishop. 

A course dealing with the identification, classification, silvical requirements and 
distribution of the more important forest trees of the hardwood (Angiosperms) group. 



278 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



84. Regional Dendrology. 3 hours. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22. Mr. Bishop. 

A course dealing with the identification, classification, silvical requirements and 
distribution of the more important forest trees of the coniferous (Gymnosperms) 
group. 

303. Dry Kilning and Wood Preservation. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Fores- 
try 371. Mr. Grant. 

The air drying, kiln drying, and preservative treatment of timber. 

307. Forest Fire Protection. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Forestry 356. Mr. 
Bishop. 

A study of the causes, effects and methods for controlling wild forest fires and 
of the use of controlled fire in managing a forest property. 

310. Informational Methods in Forestry. 3 hours. Prerequisites: For- 
estry 307 and Forestry 359. Mr. Bishop. 

The various means and procedures for disseminating technical and non-technical 
forestry information to the public. 

320. Forest Range Management. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Botany 22 and 
Forestry 356. Mr. Jackson. 

A study of the principles of forest range management involving the use of forest 
forage as a resource; the improvement of forest range; study of forest range plants. 

330. Forestry Problems. The Staff. 

Class or individual instruction and guidance. Assigned or selected problems in the 
field of forestry. A complete report of work will be required. 

340. Forest Mensuration. 3 hours. Three 2-hour laboratory-lecture peri- 
ods. Prerequisites: Mathematics lOly and Agricultural Engineering 11. 
Mr. Labyak. 

Measurement of forest products ; determination of volume in the tree and in the 
stand; growth and yield of trees and stands. 

341. Forest Mensuration. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Forestry 340. Mr. 
Patterson. 

Determination of standards for the collection of forest data; sampling methods 
in forestry. 

342. Forest Mensuration. 3 hours. Three 2-hour laboratory-lecture peri- 
ods. Prerequisite: Forestry 351. Mr. Labyak. 

Graphic analysis in forestry; construction of volume and yield tables; growth 
and yield prediction. 

356. Silvics. Prerequisites: Botany 21-22 and Forestry 83-84. Mr. Jackson. 
Fundamental principles of forest physiology and ecology: the effects of various 

factors of site upon the characteristics, growth and development of trees and stands ; 
forest classification. 

357. Practice of Silviculture. Three lectures and two laboratory periods. 
Prerequisite: Forestry 356. Mr. Jackson. 

Cultural treatment of the forest including intermediate cuttings, methods of se- 
curing natural reproduction, and planting. 

358. Reforestation Practices. 3 hours. One laboratory and two lecture 
periods. Prerequisite: Forestry 356. Mr. Jackson. 

Nursery management; collection, extraction, testing, and storage of seed; plant- 
ing methods. 

359. Regional Silviculture. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Forestry 356, 357. 
Mr. Jackson. 

The application of silvicultural methods in the various forest regions of the United 
States. 

370. Wood Anatomy. 3 hours. Three laboratories. Prerequisites: Fores- 
try 83-84. Mr. Grant. 

Identification of woods by gross and minute structure. Structural features of wood. 

371. Forest Products. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Forestry 370. Mr. Grant. 
The preparation, manufacture and use of forest products other than lumber. 

377. Logging. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Forestry 370. Mr. Grant. 
Logging methods and transportation. Cost studies. Logging equipment. 

378. Lumber Manufacture. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Forestry 370. Mr. 
Grant. 

Methods of manufacture, re-manufacture, grading and distribution. 



THE GEORGE FOSTER PEABODY SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 279 



385. Game Management. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Forestry 356 or Botany 
375. Mr. Jenkins. 

A general course dealing with game management and game management policy 
and administration; the relation of game management to forestry and forest man- 
agement. 

386. Wildlife Management Techniques. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Fores- 
try 385 or Zoology 353. Mr. Jenkins. 

Field and laboratory techniques in wildlife management. Emphasis is placed on 
techniques commonly required of professional wildlife workers. 

390. Forest Finance. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Economics 5x and Math- 
ematics lOly. Mr. Patterson. 

The financial aspects of forestry as a business enterprise; methods of determining 
the value of forest property: the rate earned by forest properties: the appraisal of 
stumpage values; the appraisal of damage; the taxation of forest lands. 

391. Forest Economics. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Economics 5x. Mr. Lab- 
yak. 

The forest as a natural resource, its present extent and use; forest ownership; con- 
sumption, distribution and prices of forest products; social aspects of forestry; for- 
est land use planning. 

404. Forest Improvements. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Forestry 307. Mr. 
Patterson. 

The construction of forest improvements on a forest property and the adminis- 
tration of forest properties. 

405. Naval Stores Practice. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Forestry 357 and 
370. Mr. Bishop. 

Factors affecting the production of naval stores; the management of forests for 
naval stores production; the manufacturing and marketing of naval stores products. 

406. Utilization Field Trip. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Forestry 370 and 
378. Mr. Bishop and Mr. Grant. 

A course designed to give the student personal observations of the various phases of 
the production, manufacturing and use of forest products. 

410. Forest Policy. 3 hours. Mr. Weddell. 

The development of forest policies and activities of the federal and state gov- 
ernments. Open only to forestry students. 

411. Forest Management. 3 hours. Prerequisites: Forestry 341 and 357; 
The organization of forests for management. 

412. Forest Management. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Forestry 411. Mr. Pat- 
Economics 5x. Mr. Patterson. 

terson. 

The regulation of the cut of forests for sustained yield : the development of forest 
working plans. 

413. Forest Management. 6 hours. Prerequisite: Forestry 30, 307, 390, 
406 and 411. Mr. Patterson. 

The preparation of a working plan for a forest property. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

801-802. Advanced Silviculture. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Forestry 83, 
84, 359. Mr. Jackson or Mr. Weddell. 

An advanced course dealing with the various phases of silvics and silvicultural 
management. A specialized problem must be worked out during the year and a writ- 
ten report submitted upon completion of the work. 

803-804. Advanced Silviculture. 10 hours. Prerequisite: Forestry 802. 
Mr. Jackson or Mr. Weddell. 

A continuation of Forestry 801-802, embodying comprehensive research in the field 
of silviculture. The courses 801-802-803-804 form a sequence, and a thesis must be 
submitted upon completion of the work. 

811-812. Advanced Dendrology. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Forestry 83, 84, 
359. Mr. Bishop. 

A detailed study of the taxonomy, range, and habitats of trees. The collection and 
mounting of herbarium specimens will constitute a part of the work. 

821-822. Advanced Utilization. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Forestry 371, 
377, and 405, or equivalent. Mr. Grant and Mr. Bishop. 

An advanced course dealing with the various phases of the production, manufac- 
ture, and use of forest products, including naval stores. 



280 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

823-824. Advanced Utilization. 10 hours. Prerequisite: Forestry 822. 
Mr. Grant and Mr. Bishop. 

A continuation of Forestry 821-822. 

831-832. Advanced Forest Management. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Fores- 
try 341 and 412. Mr. Patterson. 

An advanced course dealing with the organization of forests : their regulation for 
sustained yield; and various mensurational and economic problems common to forest 
management. 

833-834. Advanced Forest Management. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Fores- 
try 831-832. Mr. Patterson. 
A continuation of Forestry 831-832. 

845-846. Advanced Forest Economics. 10 hours. Prerequisites: Economics 
5x, Forestry 391 and 412. Mr. Worrell. 

An advanced course dealing with the extent and use of forests; consumption 
trends ; and marketing of forest products. 

921. Applied Forestry Problems. Hours to be arranged. Minimum of 
5 hours. Prerequisite: Bachelor of Science in Forestry or equivalent. The 
Staff. 

This course is designed to give the graduate student an opportunity to apply 
his knowledge to the study of forestry topics or problems. Instruction will be on 
the basis of individual guidance or, if the need arises, class instruction. Each student 
will be required to prepare a complete written report of his study and present it for 
criticism before the assembled members of the class and School of Forestry faculty. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

THE FACULTY 
John Andrew Dotson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Dean. 
Jennie Beer, Secretary. 



Ira Edward Aaron, A.B.J., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education and Re- 
search Assistant, Bureau of Educational Studies and Field Services. 

Lorenzo Eugene Allgood, B.S., M.Ed., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in the Demonstration School. 

Eulala L. Amos, B.S.Ed., M.A., Assistant Professor of Art Education, Atlanta 
Area Teacher Education Service. 

Alida Armstrong, B.S.H.E., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in 
the Demonstration School. 

Louise Green Bailey, B.S., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in 
Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

Alice Beall, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Associate Professor of Education in Home 
Economics. 

Ernestine Bledsoe, A.B., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education. 

♦Joseph Cullie Bledsoe, A.B.Ed., M.S.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education 
and Research Assistant, Bureau of Educational Studies and Field Ser- 
vices. 

Arthur Gibbon Bovee, Ph.B., Certificat de l'Association Phonetique Interna- 
tionale, Professor of the Teaching of French. 

Harry Bricker, B.A., M.A., Visiting Professor of Education and Member of 
Staff, Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service. 

Kathleen Drake Broadhurst, B.S. Ed., A.M.Ed., B.S. in L.S., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education and Education Librarian. 

Sibyl Browne, A.B., B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Art Education, Atlanta 
Area Teacher Education Service. 

James Garlin Bryant. B.S.A., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Education. 

Reba Burnham, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education. 

James Wallace Butts, Jr., A.B., Associate Professor of Health and Physical 
Education, Head Football Coach, and Director of Intercollegiate Ath- 
letics. 

Albert Byron Callaway, A.B.. B.S., M.A., Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Edu- 
cation. 

Ernest Jackson Claxton, Jr., B.S., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in Industrial Arts in the Demonstration School. 



•On leave. 

[281 ] 



282 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

*Johnnye V. Cox, B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Sadie Menzies Ceaig, B.L., B.S., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in Science and Mathematics in the Demonstration School. 

Osie Thomas Dekle, B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

James Lewis Dickerson, A.B., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of Education, 
Director of Student Teaching, and Principal of the Demonstration School. 

Inez Dolvin, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education and Member of 
the Staff, Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service. 

John Andrew Dotson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education and Dean 
of the College of Education. 

Amon Ocyrus Duncan, B.S.A., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of Agricultural 
Education. 

James Elton Dunn, B.S., Temporary Part-time Instructor in Education. 

Hilda Gunter Dyches, B.S., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in 
the Demonstration School. 

David Lewis Earnest, A.B., M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Stacy Knight Ebert, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

Dorothea Ann Edwards, B.S.H.E., M.S.H.E., Instructor in Education and 
Critic Teacher in the Demonstration School. 

Mamie McRee Elliott, A.B., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

Clara Eppes Evans, A.B., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in Ele- 
mentary Education in the Demonstration School. 

Bramwell W. C. Gabrielsen. A.B., M.A., Associate Professor of Health and 
Physical Education. 

Karl Claudius Garrison, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Raymond Lee Givens, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

James Edward Greene, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education and Chair- 
man of the Division of Graduate Studies, College of Education. 

Pauline Eupha Griffin, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Instructor in Education and Li- 
brarian in the Demonstration School. 

Harold Jones Harpe, B.S., Temporary Part-time Instructor in Education. 

Oval Stanley Harrison, B.S., M.A.. Ed.D., Professor of Industrial Arts. 

♦William Lawrence Hitchcock, B.S.A., M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Educa- 
tion. 

Newton C. Hodgson, B.A., M.A., Visiting Professor of Education and Mem- 
ber of Staff, Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service. 



*On leave. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 283 

Charles Franklin Hudgixs. B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of Educa- 
tion. 

Lillian Brown Johnson, A.B., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in 
English and Social Studies in the Demonstration School. 

Emily Jones, A.B., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in Ele- 
mentary Education in the Demonstration School. 

Floyd Jordan, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education and Coordinator of 
the Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service. 

Frank Kaley, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in the 
Demonstration School. 

Effie Lou Keaster, B.A., M.Ed., Associate Professor of Health and Physical 
Education. 

Harbin Bailey Lawson, B.S.Ed.. M.S.Ed., Assistant Professor of Health and 
Physical Education. 

Clifford Gray Lewis. B.S. in Phys. Ed., M.A., Assistant Professor of Health 
and Physical Education. 

Laura Powers Marbut, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education and 
Critic Teacher in Social Science in the Demonstration School. 

Cora Ann Miller, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Health and Physical 
Education . 

Floride Moore, B.S.H.E., M.S., Associate Professor of Teacher Education in 
Home Economics. 

Van Cleve Morris, A.B., M.A., Ed.D.. Assistant Professor of Education and 
Research Assistant in Bureau of Educational Studies and Field Services. 

Victor Chalmers Nix, B.S.Ed., Instructor in Industrial Arts. 

Annie Ida Obershain, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

George Ligon O'Kelly. Jk.. B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Education. 

Dorothy Perry. B.S. in Phys. Ed., M.A., Instructor in Health and Physical 
Education. 

Helen Loftis Perry. B.S., M.Ed.. Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher 
in Elementary Education in the Demonstration School. 

*John McFerrin Pollock, B.S.. B.A.A., M.S.. Assistant Professor of Industrial 
Arts. 

Franklin Taylor Powell. B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Part-time Instructor in Educa- 
tion. 

Edwin Davis Pusey, A.B., M.A., LL.D., Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Horace Bonar Ritchie, A.B., M.A., Professor of Education. 

Gerald Burns Robins, B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Instructor in Distributive Education. 



*On leave. 



284 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Ila Rooks, A.B., M.Ed., Temporary Part-time Instructor in Education. 

Charles Monroe Rose, B.S.A., M.Ed., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in Agricultural Education in the Demonstration School. 

Eileen Russell, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation. 

William Owen Nixon Scott, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Edu- 
cation. 

Lynn Shufelt, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor of Education and Member of 
the Staff, Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service. 

Florence Alice Simpson, A.B.Ed., M.A., Instructor in Education and Critic 
Teacher in Mathematics in the Demonstration School. 

Stanton James Singleton, A.B.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Edu- 
cation. 

Dora O. Smith, B.S., Instructor in Education and Critic Teacher in the 
Demonstration School. 

Dotne Muncy Smith, B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Ernest Bethleham Smith, B.S., M.A., Professor of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation, Head of the Department of Health and Physical Education for 
Men, and Chairman of the Division of Health and Physical Education. 

Jennie Belle Smith, B.M., Supervisor of Music in the Demonstration School. 

Mary Ella Lunday Soule, A.B., M.A., Professor of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation and Head of the Department of Health and Physical Education for 
Women. 

Lee Sprowles, A.B., M.A., Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education and Re- 
search Assistant in the Bureau of Educational Studies and Field Services. 

James Aaron Strickland, B.B.A., M.Ed., Instructor. 

Lura Belle Strong, A.B., Instructor Emeritus in Health and Physical Educa- 
tion. 

Rachel Sibley Sutton, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Richard William Tews, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Health and Physi- 
cal Education. 

Mary Jane Tingle, A.B., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education and Assistant 
Principal of the Demonstration School. 

Elizabeth Todd, Ph.B., M.A., Professor of Education in Home Economics. 

Ralph Harmon Tolbert, A.B., B.S.A., M.S.Ed., Associate Professor of Agri- 
cultural Education and Acting Chairman, Division of Vocational Edu- 
cation. 

Forrest Grady Towns, B.S.Ed., Assistant Professor of Health and Physical 
Education. 

Chester Coleman Travelstead, A.B., M.M.Ed., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Education and Research Assistant in the Bureau of Educational Studies 
and Field Services. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 2^5 

James William Whatley, B.S., Assistant Professor of Health and Physical 
Education. 

Joseph Anderson Williams, A.B., M.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., Professor of Education 
and Assistant to the President. 

Charles Micaijah Williamson, B.F.A., M.F.A., Instructor in Education and 
Critic Teacher in Art Education in the Demonstration School. 



Omer Clyde Aderhold, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., President of the University. 
Alvin Blocksom Biscoe, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of Faculties. 



Joseph Thomas Askew, Ph.B., M.A., LL.D., Dean of Student Affairs. 

Walter Newman Danner, Jr., B.S.A.E., M.S.A., Registrar and Director of Ad- 
missions. 

John Dixon Bolton, C.P.A., Comptroller and Treasurer. 



286 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

PEABODY COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The George Peabody College of Education began in 1903 when Chancellor 
Walter B. Hill organized the new Department of Philosophy and Education. 
Dr. Thomas Jackson Woofter was made head of the department. In 1911 
the Peabody Board submitted the following contract which was approved by 
the Governor and the General Assembly: 

"7w consideration of a grant of $40,000 by the Trustees of the Peabody 
Education Fund for the erection and equipment of a building for the Pea- 
body School of Education in The University of Georgia, The University of 
Georgia hereby agrees to maintain sufficiently and to set apart annually 
not less than $10,000 for the maintenance of this School of Education, this 
sum to P~ a perpetual annuity" 

Thus the Department of Philosophy and Education became the Peabody 
School of Education. Dr. T. J. Woofter, head of the department, was ap- 
pointed as the first dean of the new school and served in this capacity for 
twenty years. 

In 1931 the Peabody School of Education of the University, the Georgia 
State Teachers College, the Department of Rural and Vocational Education 
of the College of Agriculture, and the Departments of Physical Education 
for Men and Women were combined. The Peabody College of Education is 
an integral part of the University of Georgia and by action of the Board of 
Regents, it provides and administers all professional courses designed for the 
preparation of teachers and all other educational workers. Its purpose is to 
assist the student in the acquirement of the knowledge of the subjects which 
he wishes to teach, to develop a professional attitude toward education, and 
to develop skill in the use of special methods in teaching and supervision. 

The effort of the College is to bring into proper adjustment within the 
limits of the four-year courses the academic training, the theoretical pro- 
fessional training, and the practical professional training necessary for 
effective teaching. 

The College is a professional school and ranks as such with the other 
professional schools of the University. 

The organization of the Peabody College of Education comprises the fol- 
lowing divisions: Undergraduate, Graduate, Research, Service, and the Dem- 
onstration School. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Students registered in the College of Education with a major in language 
and literature are eligible for election to Phi Beta Kappa. Students pur- 
suing a program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education 
are eligible for election to Phi Kappa Phi. 

Kappa Delta Pi. A chapter of this national organization was established 
at the University in 1929. Membership is based upon high scholastic attain- 
ments and promise of future usefulness in the field of educational leader- 
ship. 

AREAS OF INSTRUCTION 

The College offers instruction in the following areas: Administration and 
Supervision, Curriculum, Educational Psychology, Research and Measure- 
ments, Supervision of Teaching, Elementary Education, Secondary Educa- 
tion, Health and Physical Education, Industrial Arts, Agricultural Educa- 
tion, Home Economics Education, Secretarial and Distributive Education, 
Art Education, Music Education, and Library Education. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 287 



DEGREES 

The College offers the following degrees: (a) Undergraduate degree: 
Bachelor of Science in Education; (b) Graduate degrees: Master of Science 
in Education, Master of Education, and Doctor of Education. 

CURRICULA 

In providing facilities for the preparation of teachers and other educational 
workers the needs of the following types of workers are recognized and pro- 
vided for. Each curriculum is sufficiently flexible to meet the special needs 
of individual students. 

Students must make grades of C or above in all courses in education and 
in their teaching fields. 

Undergraduate Division 

The undergraduate division provides for the following types of teachers: 
(1) Agricultural, (2) Public School Art, (3) Elementary School, (4) Second- 
ary School, (5) Home Economics, (6) Public School Music, (7) Health and 
Physical Education, (8) Industrial Arts, (9) Teacher-librarians, (10) Secre- 
tarial Education, and (11) Distributive Education. 

Graduate Division 

The Graduate Division provides for the following: (1) Elementary School 
Teachers, (2) Elementary School Principals, (3) Secondary School Teachers, 
(4) Junior College Teachers, (5) Secondary School Principals, (6) School 
Superintendents, (7) Counselors, (8) School Psychologists, (9) Supervisors, 
(10) Teachers in special fields such as Health and Physical Education, In- 
dustrial Arts, Agriculture, Home Economics, and Secretarial and Distributive 
Education. 

Graduate work in education is distinctly professional in character and is 
under the administration and supervision of the Graduate School. In addi- 
tion to this general supervision, special direction in the graduate field of 
education is provided by the College of Education. A wide range of 
graduate courses especially designed for those specializing in the higher 
levels of education is offered. One or more faculty members will be ap- 
pointed from the staff of the College to act as advisers in arranging and 
directing the student's program. 

The student in cooperation with his advisers will set up his graduate 
program. The satisfactory completion of four undergraduate courses in edu- 
cation is a prerequisite of any course in education for graduate credit. 

Graduate students in education may qualify for the degree of Master of 
Science in Education, Master of Education, or Doctor of Education. 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN EDUCATION LEADING TO 
MASTER'S DEGREES 

Graduate students in education may qualify for either of two degrees at 
the master's level, depending on their vocational objectives. The degree of 
Master of Science in Education is designed for students whose vocations 
require training in research procedures. The degree of Master of Educa- 
tion is designed for students whose vocational objectives do not presuppose 
rigorous training in research procedures but rather a broad background 
of professional training. 

The student should seek the advice of the Chairman of the Division of 
Graduate Studies of the College of Education in determining the suitability 
of the degree program to his educational purpose. 



288 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

The Georgia State Board of Education has approved the College of Edu- 
cation to offer graduate training programs leading to the following types 
of five-year professional certificates: 

Teachers — T-5 certificate 
Principals — P-5 certificate 
Superintendents — Su-5 certificate 
Supervisors — Sv-5 certificate 
Guidance Counselors — GC-5 certificate 

In addition to the officially approved programs listed above, the College 
of Education offers special training facilities for visiting teachers and other 
educational specialists. 

During his first quarter of graduate residence, the graduate major in Edu- 
cation should request the Chairman of the Division of Graduate Studies, 
College of Education, to assign him to a major professor. At this time the 
student will be furnished detailed information concerning the requirements 
of the graduate degree for which he wishes to become a candidate. 

Master of Science in Education 

The minimum requirement for the degree of Master of Science in Educa- 
tion is an approved program (including a major of four courses and two 
minors of two courses each), residence to the extent of one academic year 
(which may in some instances be satisfied by a minimum of thirty weeks 
in residence), and a thesis based upon original source material. At least 
one minor must be taken in a field other than education. Candidates for 
this degree must have Education 816, Methods and Applications of Educa- 
tional Research. 

Master of Education 

The minimum requirement for the degree of Master of Education is an 
approved program, including eleven courses (fifty-five quarter hours) and 
a residence requirement which cannot be satisfied with less than a minimum 
of thirty-six weeks. At least three of the courses in the student's program 
must be in fields other than education. Candidates for this degree must 
complete for credit the two following courses: Education 826, Critique of 
Educational Literature; and Education 921, Laboratory in Applied Educa- 
tion. No thesis is required for this degree. 

Doctor of Education 

Requirements. In general, the requirements for the Doctor of Education 
degree are the same as those for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. In 
exceptional cases, however, some modification of the foreign language re- 
quirement may be allowed where conditions seem to justify it. Any such 
modification must have the specific approval of the Executive Committee of 
the Graduate Faculty. The Graduate Faculty may, in individual cases, also 
make such modification of the residence requirement as seems necessary 
to meet the need for approved field work. 

The dissertation required for the degree of Doctor of Education will em- 
phasize the intelligent application of research techniques to the solution 
of a problem connected with educational practice, and it is the most im- 
portant single requirement for the degree. It is intended to show the candi- 
date's ability to conduct an independent investigation based upon source 
materials growing out of practical educational problems in his field. The 
subject chosen must be definite and of limited range, the method of in- 
vestigation must be formulated with exactness, the sources that are em- 
ployed must be properly evaluated, and the conclusions must be well-sup- 
ported. 

Candidates for this degree must have the personal qualities necessary for 
success in their profession, must have had a broad background of training, 
and must have had at least two years of successful experience in the teach- 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



ing profession. A candidate who is securing training for administration 
should include a minor in the social sciences; one who is training for 
teaching should have a minor in the subject matter field in which he pro- 
poses to teach. 

The Graduate School will admit to candidacy for this degree only those 
students who give promise of the power to do original and creative work 
on educational problems of major and lasting significance. 

BUREAU OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES AND FIELD SERVICES 

The functions of the Bureau of Educational Studies and Field Services 
are: (1) to carry on, when requested, systematic research in problems of the 
public schools, the State Department of Education, and the University Sys- 
tem of Georgia; (2) to provide, when requested, special field service per- 
sonnel to the public schools and units of the University System to enable 
them to deal more effectively with the problems facing the System or units; 
(3) to conduct, when requested and when feasible, surveys of schools and 
school systems; (4) to train graduate students and others in the techniques 
of educational research; (5) to edit and publish several studies and other 
materials of interest to educators and the public; and (6) to assist local 
school leaders in conducting educational research. 

THE DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL 

Supervised observation and apprentice teaching are required of candidates 
for a degree in the Peabody College of Education. Students preparing to 
teach in high school do their practice teaching in one or both teaching 
fields (major or minor) ; students preparing to teach in the elementary 
schools have their directed teaching at either the primary or intermediate 
level, or both. Apprentice teaching is articulated with instruction in general 
and specific methods to the limits of practical possibility. Observation and 
practice teaching are done under the daily direction of competent teachers. 

The Demonstration School is available as a laboratory for observation 
and experimentation and provides opportunities for the study of educa- 
tional problems and practices. The classroom instruction in education is 
thus combined with the opportunity to observe and participate in the ac- 
tivities of this school. 

SATURDAY CLASSES 

The College of Education holds Saturday classes for superintendents, 
principals, and teachers living within commuting distance of Athens. The 
program is planned to meet the expressed needs of those attending. The 
offerings are on both the graduate and undergraduate levels, and are not 
limited to work in education. 

THE ATLANTA AREA TEACHER EDUCATION SERVICE 

The College of Education of the University of Georgia, Emory University, 
Agnes Scott College, Georgia Institute of Technology, Columbia Theological 
Seminary, Atlanta Arts Association, in cooperation with six school systems 
in the Atlanta area, constitute the Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service. 
The purpose of the Atlanta Area Teacher Education Service is to pool the 
resources of the higher institutions listed above in providing a program of 
instruction for the teachers in the Atlanta area. Courses are offered on both 
the credit and non-credit basis. The cooperating institutions provide the in- 
structional and consultative personnel. Residence graduate credit up to 15 
quarter hours may be earned in this program. 

Several members of the staff of the College of Education and other units 
of the University serve as full-time or part-time instructors in the Atlanta 
Area Teacher Education Service. 



290 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

OFF-CAMPUS WORKSHOPS 

Upon request of county or independent system school officials the College 
of Education conducts off-campus workshops each school year. Members of 
the college staff work with principals, teachers, and other school officials in 
discovering and solving individual and group problems. Staff personnel 
is available for work with workshop participants on problems arising in 
classroom teaching, faculty meetings, and community planning. Graduate or 
undergraduate credit may be earned in a workshop. 

CLINICS 

Clinics for Teachers of Vocational Agriculture. In cooperation with 
the State Department of Education and the technical departments of the 
University, both professional and technical short unit courses will be offered 
to groups of employed teachers throughout the state as a part of a program 
for the improvement of teachers in service. These courses run from two 
to five days, depending upon the nature of the problems involved. 

Other Clinics. Other clinics will be organized, staffed, and conducted 
by the College of Education upon request from groups of educators in the 
state concerned with various administrative and instructional problems. 

RELATED MAJORS AND MINORS 

The related majors and minors are named in the order of frequency of 
their appearance in typical high school teaching assignments. 

Majors Minors 

Industrial Arts Physical Education, Social Sciences, Mathe- 
matics. 

English Mathematics, Physical Science, Physical Educa- 
tion. 

Social Sciences English, Mathematics, Biological Science, Gen- 
eral Science, Physical Science. 

Latin English, French, Social Science, Mathematics. 

French Latin, English, Social Science, Mathematics. 

Mathematics Physical Science. Social Science, Biological 

Science. 

Physical Science ...Biological Science, Mathematics, Social Sci- 
ence. 

Home Economics Physical Science, Mathematics, Social Science. 

Physical Education Biological Science. Physical Science, Social Sci- 
ence. 

Biological Science Social Science, Biological Science, Physical 

Science, Mathematics. 

Library Service English, Social Science. 

STATE CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS 

The following programs of the College of Education, for the preparation 
of teachers, are approved by the State Board of Education. A person com- 
pleting any one of these programs may be recommended to the Division of 
Certification, State Department of Education, for a four-year professional 
certificate. For further information see the bulletin of the State Department 
of Education entitled "Certification of Teachers." 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 291 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
IN EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 

In the preparation of elementary teachers the freshman and sophomore 
years are devoted chiefly to general education. The program, which includes 
English, social science, mathematics, physical and biological sciences, music, 
art, and physical education, is required of all persons planning to be ele- 
mentary teachers. The program for the junior and senior years consists of 
three parts: A group of required courses in education, a group of required 
subject matter courses, and a group of approved electives. 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 History 110 x-y 10 

Speech 8 5 English 22 x-y 10 

Political Science 1 5 Social Science 4 5 

Human Biology 1-2 10 Psychology 1 5 

Mathematics lOlx or lOly _ 5 Art 100 5 

Education 103 5 Industrial Arts 133 5 

Physical Science 1, Chemistry 21, Economics 5x 5 

Earth Science 4, or Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

Geography 121 5 Physical Education 2 (for men)... 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 or 

Physical Education 1 (for men) Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 

or 
Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 

50 50 

Junior and Senior Requirements* 

Hours 

Education 304, 335.4, 336.4 15 

Education 346.4, 347.4, 348.4 15 

Education 349 5 

Sociology 431 ! 5 

Health Education 307, 344 10 

Home Economics 304 5 

Geography 310 5 

Music 343 or 307 5 

Approved Electives 30 

95 
PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION FOR GENERAL SECONDARY TEACHERS 

In the preparation of high school teachers the freshman and sophomore 
years are devoted chiefly to general education. The program, which includes 
English, social science, mathematics, physical and biological sciences, music, 
art, and physical education, is required of all persons planning to teach in 
high school. The junior and senior years consist of a group of required 
courses in education and an approved program in one or two teaching fields. 



♦Education courses may bo taken any time during the junior and senior years, but 
must be taken in the order in which they are listed. Education 303 will be required 
of all transfer students who have not had Education 103 or equivalent. 



292 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hour? 

English 2 x-y 10 History 110 x-y 10 

Speech 8 5 English 22 x-y 10 

Political Science 1 _ 5 Social Science 4 5 

Human Biology 1-2 10 Psychology 1 5 

Mathematics lOlx or lOly 5 Art 100 5 

Education 103 5 Industrial Arts 133 5 

Physical Science 1, Chemistry 21, Economics 5x 5 

Earth Science 4, or Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

Geography 121 5 Physical Education 2 (for men) .... 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 or 

Physical Education 1 (for men). Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 

or 
Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 

50 50 

Junior and Senior Requirements* 

Hours 

Education 304, 335.5, 336.5 15 

Education 346.5, 347.5, 348.5 15 

Education 349 5 

Teaching major (See suggested programs) 30 

Teaching minor (See suggested programs) 20 

Electives 10 

95 
RECOMMENDED COURSES IN TEACHING FIELDS FOR 
HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 

The program in the teaching field may be divided into a major of at least 
30 hours and a minor of at least 20 hours, or 50 hours may be concentrated 
in one broad field. The courses in the major and minor teaching fields must 
be planned with the student's adviser. In general, course selections should 
be made from the following programs. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE TEACHERS 

(Minimum of 30 hours for a major or 20 hours for a minor) 

Hours 
History : 

History 310, History of the Far East 5 

History 330, Europe Since 1914 5 

History 350x-y American History 10 

History 395, The United States in World Affairs Since 1900 5 

History 458, History of American Diplomacy 5 

History 492, The Latin-American Republics Since 1823 5 

Political Science: 

Political Science 312, The Governments of the Soviet Union and 

the Far East 5 

Political Science 320, International Relations 5 

Political Science 368, County and Municipal Government 5 

Political Science 406, State Government 5 

Political Science 410, American Political Parties 5 

Political Science 421, World Political Organization 5 



•Education courses may be taken at any time during the junior and senior years, 
but must be taken in the order in which they are listed. Education 303 will be re- 
quired of all transfer students who have not had Education 103 or equivalent. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



293 



Sociology : 

Sociology 360, Contemporary Social Problems 5 

Sociology 431, Principles of Rural-Urban Sociology _ 5 

Sociology 461, The Family 5 

Economics : 

Economics 386, Labor Problems 5 

Economics 455, Contemporary Economic Problems 5 

Economics 466, Economics of Consumption 5 

Geogeaphy : 

Geography 310, Conservation of Natural Resources _ 5 

Geography 341, Problems in Political Geography 5 

Geography 358, Economic Geography 5 

ENGLISH TEACHERS 



(Minimum of 30 hours for a major or 20 hours for a minor) 



English: 

English 305, Lyric Poetry 

English 310, Advanced Grammar and Syntax 

English 343, Contemporary Drama 

English 361, The Short Story _ 

English 280, The Modern Novel 

English 420, American Literature to 1865 __ 

English 422, American Literature after 1865 . 

English 429, Southern Literature 



Hours 



Speech: 

Speech 309, English Phonetics 

Speech 310, Speech Correction 

Speech 311, Speech Correction 

Speech 386, Oral Interpretation of Literature 

Speech 396, Dramatic Interpretation 



_ 5 
_ 5 
_ 5 
... 5 
5 



JOURNALISM : 

Journalism 366, Journalism in Secondary School . . 
MATHEMATICS TEACHERS 



(Minimum of 30 hours for a major or 20 hours for a minor) 



Mathematics: 

Mathematics 101 x-y, College Algebra and Trigonometry 

Mathematics 102, Mathematics of Finance 

Mathematics 110, Analytic Geometry 

Mathematics 354 and 355, Calculus _ _ 

Mathematics 356, Statistics 

Mathematics 412, College Geometry 



Hour3 



......10 

3 

__ 5 
......10 

... ... 5 

5 



Business Administration: 
Business Administration 



x-y, Principles of Accounting 



10 



294 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

TEACHERS OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES* 

(Minimum of 30 hours for a major or 20 hours for a minor) 

Hours 
French: 

French 101-102, Elementary French (Not required if student has 

had 2 years of high-school French) 10 

French 103, Intermediate French 5 

French 104, French Grammar, Composition, and Conversation .„ 5 

French 106, Intermediate French Conversation 5 

French 201, 202, Introduction to the Study of French Literature 10 

French 357, French Phonetics 5 

French 456, Advanced French Syntax and Composition 5 

French (Education) 481, Problems of Teaching Romance Languages 5 

Spanish: 

Spanish 101-102, Elementary Spanish (Not required if student 

has had 2 years of high-school Spanish) ___10 

Spanish 103, Intermediate Spanish 5 

Spanish 104, Spanish Reading :.. 5 

Spanish 106, Spanish Conversation .._ 5 

Spanish 201, 202, Introduction to Spanish Literature 10 

Spanish 420, Modern Spanish Novel _ - 5 

Spanish 426, Advanced Spanish Syntax and Composition 5 

Spanish 428, Spanish Phonetics 5 

Spanish (Education) 481, Problems of Teaching Romance Languages 5 

Latin : 

Latin 201, 202, Elementary Latin 10 

Latin 203, Intermediate Latin 5 

Latin 304, Reading in Latin _ — 5 

SCIENCE TEACHERS 

(Minimum of 50 hours for a major and 25 hours for a minor) 

Hours 
Botany : 

Botany 21-22, Elementary Botany 10 

Botany 305, Field Botany - - 5 

Botany 375, Plant Ecology 5 

Chemistry: 

Chemistry 21-22, Inorganic Chemistry 10 

Chemistry 340 a-b, (346) Organic Chemistry 10(5) 

Chemistry 370, 371, Industrial Chemistry -.10 

Physical Science Survey: 

Physical Science 1, Physics and Astronomy 5 

Physics: 

Physics 26, General Physics — Heat, Sound, Light 5 

Physics 27, General Physics — Mechanics ___ — - 5 

Physics 329, General Physics — Electricity and Modern Physics _ 5 

Physics 370, Principles of Photography 5 

Physics 380, Electronics 5 

♦Upon recommendation of a student's adviser and with permission of the Dean of 
the College of Education, language teachers may substitute 15 hours of an approved 
program in foreign language for 15 hours of junior division courses. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 295 

Astronomy : 

Astronomy 391, Descriptive Astronomy 5 

Zoology : 

Zoology 25-26, General Zoology 10 

Zoology 373, Entomology 5 

Zoology 381, Ornithology 5 

Zoology 353, Animal Ecology 5 

Zoology 374, Animal Entomology 5 

Bacteriology: 

Bacteriology 350, Introductory Bacteriology 5 

Geology : 

Geology 25, Elements of Geology (Physical) 5 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS** 

(Minimum of 20 hours for a minor) 

For a minor in health and physical education the student must select a 
minimum of 20 hours; these hours may be from one of the following areas: 
Physical Education, 18, 19, 311 (Women: 352a-b-c. 353a-b-c, 315), (Men: 
380a-b-c, 381a-b-c), 372, 376, 377, 383; Recreation. 18, 19, 40a-b-c, 372, 376, 
377, 384, 385, 386, 387; Health Education, 307, 344. 370. 371, 372, 377, 387, 383; 
Dance, 307, 372, 311, 352a-b-c. 353a-b-c, 357, 358, 359, 368, 377, 399. 

SCHOOL LIBRARIANS 

(Minimum of 30 hours for a major — or 20 hours for a minor) 

The University of Georgia now offers thirty quarter hours work in Library 
Service. The courses are designed to meet the needs of five groups of per- 
sons: (1) students who wish to qualify for positions as librarians or teacher- 
librarians in elementary or secondary schools under the requirements of the 
Southern Association standards for accredited schools; (2) students who 
wish to prepare for public library service in small communities and rural 
areas; (3) teachers and prospective teachers who feel the need of wider 
acquaintance with library materials; (4) administrators and supervisors of 
public schools; (5) students in other courses by supplying elementary meth- 
ods of library research. 

A major concentration of study consists of thirty quarter hours in addition 
to apprentice work. A minor consists of twenty quarter hours, including 
302, 303, 304 and 305. which courses contain the subject matter requirements 
for certification as teacher-librarian. No courses are offered by correspond- 
ence. 

Hours 
Library Service 301, Library Guidance for Teachers and Administrators.— 5 

Library Service 302, Principles of Book Evaluation 5 

Library Service 303, Utilization of Library Materials 5 

Library Service 304, Organization of Library Materials 5 

Library Service 305, Administration of a Small Library 5 

Library Service 306, Literature for Children and Adults 5 



♦♦Education courses may be taken any time during the junior or senior years, but 
must be taken in the order in which they are listed. Education 303 will be required 
#£ all transfer students who have not had Education 103 or equivalent. 



296 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

TEACHERS OF ART 

(Minimum of 30 hours for a minor) 

Hours 

Art 100, Art Principles 5 

Art 20, Art Structure (Drawing) „ 5 

Art 30, Art Structure (Design) or equivalent 5 

Art 413, Crafts ...... 5 

Art 231, Painting _ _ 5 

or Art 241, Watercolor 

Choice of one of the following: 5 

Art 40, Art Structure (Nature of Materials) 

Art 111, Design 

Art 121, Drawing and Composition 

Art 242, Watercolor 

Art 250, Weaving 

Art 160, Pottery or equipment 

Art 414, Drawing and Painting (for teachers) 

Art 415, Design 

Art 416, Modeling and Carving 

Art 423, Materials and Design 

Art 283, Modern Art 

TEACHERS OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS* 

(Minimum of 25 hours for a minor) 

Industrial Arts 20 or 328 _ - __ 5 

Industrial Arts 22 or 325 5 

Industrial Arts 150 5 

Industrial Arts 330 - 5 

Industrial Arts 550 _.. _ _ 5 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2 x-y —10 English 22 x-y 10 

Speech 8 — 5 History 110 x-y 10 

Political Science 1 5 Art 100 5 

Mathematics lOlx or lOly 5 Industrial Arts 22 5 

Education 103 5 Industrial Arts 150 5 

Industrial Arts 20 .— 5 Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

Psychology 1 5 Physical Education 2 (for men)— 

Physical Science 1 or or 

Geography 121 5 Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 Electives — 5 

Physical Education 1 (for men)—. 

or 
Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 

50 50 



♦Those teachers who want a major in nidustrial arts should see the special pro- 
gram for industrial arts teachers. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 2_97 

Junior and Senior Requirements** 

Hours 

Education 304, 335.6, 336.6 15 

Education 346.6, 347.6, 348.6 15 

Education 349 5 

Industrin 1 Arts 323 5 

Industrial Arts 325 5 

Industrial Arts 328 5 

Industrial Arts 330 5 

Industrial Arts 340 5 

Industrial Arts 550 5 

Teaching Minor 20 

Elective 10 

95 
PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN ART 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 English 22 x-y 10 

Art 30 or equivalent 5 Social Science 4 5 

Art 20 5 Psychology 1 5 

Human Biology 1-2 10 Political Science 1 5 

Mathematics lOlx or lOly _ 5 Art 40, 111 10 

Speech 8 5 Music 43 3 

Education 103 5 Economics 5x or Physical 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 Science 1 5 

Physical Education 1 (for men) Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

or Physical Education 2 (for men).... 

Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 or 

Elective 3 Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 

— Elective 5 

53 53 

Junior and Senior Retirements* 

Hours 

Education 304, 335.9, and 336.9 . 10 or 15 

Education 346.9, 347.9, 348.9 15 

Education 349 5 

Sociology 431 _[_ 5 

Health Education 344 5 

Art 211 5 

Drawing and Painting (Art 231, 241. 242, or 121) 15 

Art 283 Modern Art 5 

Art 160 Pottery " 5 

Art 250 or Art 251 ~ 5 

Art 413 Crafts 5 

Approved Electives 10 

"Education courses may be taken at any time during the junior or senior rear*. 
but must be taken in the order in which they are listed. Education 303 will be : - 
quired of all transfer students who have not had Education 103 or equivalent. 

•♦Education courses may be taken at any time during the junior or senior year? 
must be taken in the order in which they are listed. Education 303 will be reqi ired 
of all transf. r students Avho have not had Education 103 or equivalent. 



298 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN MUSIC EDUCATION* 



Freshman 

Hours 

English 2x-y 10 

Human Biology 1-2 10 

Education 103 5 

Political Science 1 5 

Music 10, 11, 12 9 

Music 85 a-b-c 3 

Music 87 a-b-c 3 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 
Physical Education 1 (for men).... 

or 
Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 



Sophomore 

Hours 

Art 100, 281, or 282 5 

English 22 x-y 10 

History 110 x-y 10 

Music 34, 35, 36 9 

Music 22a-b-c 6 

Music 86 a-b-c 3 

Music 88 a-b-c 3 

Physical Science 1 or 

Geography 121 5 

Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 
Physical Education 2 (for men)... 

or 
Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 



50 



56 



Junior and Senior Requirements** 

Hours 

Education 304, Music 312 and 313; or Education 304, 335.5, and 336.5 15 

Education 346.5, 347.5, 348.5 15 

Education 349 5 

Additional hours in music to be selected with the approval of the 
Head of the Department of Music and of the Dean of 

the College of Education 40 

Approved electives 15 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 



Freshman 

Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 

Business Administration 8 3 

Speech 8 5 

Political Science 1 5 

Human Biology 1-2 10 

Mathematics lOlx or lOly 5 

Education 103 or 303 5 

Physical Science 1 or 

Geography 121 5 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 
Physical Education 1 (for men).-. 

or 
Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 



53 



Sophomore 

Hours 

English 22 x-y 10 

Social Science ± 5 

Psychology 1 5 

Art 100 5 

Economics 5 x-y 10 

Business Administration 6 x-y 10 

Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 
Physical Education 2 (for men) .... 

or 
Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 



50 



*A11 music education majors must be able to read and play on the piano simple 
hymns or music of similar difficulty before graduation. All music majors must par- 
ticipate in ensemble courses. 

••Education courses may be taken at any time during the junior or senior years, but 
must be taken in the order in which they are listed. Education 303 will be required 
of all transfer students who have not had Education 103 or equivalent. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 2_99 

Junior and Senior Requirements 

Hours 

Education 304, 335.7, 336.7 . 15 

Education 346.7, 347.7, 348.7 15 

Education 349 5 

Distributive Education 309 5 

Business Administration 303, 304, 305 6 

Business Administration 300a, b, c 9 

Business Administration 310 5 

Business Administration 370 5 

Electives 28 



93 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 



Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2 x-y 10 English 6 or 22x 5 

Speech 8 _ 5 Business Administration 8 3 

Political Science 1 5 Social Science 4 5 

Human Biology 1-2 10 Psychology 1 5 

Mathematics lOlx or lOly 5 Industrial Arts 150 5 

Education 103 or 303 5 Economics 5 x-y 10 

Distributive Education 106 3 Business Administration 6 x-y 10 

Physical Science 1 or Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

Geography 121 5 Physical Education 2 (for men)- 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 or 

Physical Education 1 (for men). ... Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 

or Electives _ 5 

Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 

53 53 

Junior and Senior Requirements 

Hours 

Education 304, 335.7, 336.7 15 

Education 346.7, 347.7, 348.7 15 

Education 349 5 

Distributive Education 308 3 

Distributive Education 309 _ 5 

Distributive Education 310 5 

Distributive Education 356 5 

Economics 360 5 

Business Administration 460 _ 5 

Business Administration 462 5 

Business Administration 463 5 

Business Administration 468 5 

Electives 10 

?8 



300 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN HOME ECONOMICS 



Freshman 

Hours 

Art 30 or 100 5 

English 2 x-y 10 

Speech 3 3 

Political Science 1 or 

Approved Elective 5 

Psychology 1 5 

Home Economics 20 5 

Education 103 5 

Human Biology 1 5 

Chemistry 21 5 

Physical Education 1 5 



Sophomore 

Hours 

English 22 x-y 10 

Chemistry 346 5 

Economics 5x or 

Approved Elective 5 

Sociology 5 or Social Science 4 5 

Home Economics 5 5 

Home Economics 75 5 

Home Economics 90 5 

Home Economics 222 5 

Physical Education 2 5 

Electives 6 



53 



56 



Junior and Senior Requirements 

Hours 

Bacteriology 350 5 

Home Economics 306, 321, 344 13 

Home Economics 351, 377, 343 13 

Home Economics 368, 369, 393, 490 16 

Education 304, 335.2, 336.2 15 

Education 346.2, 347.2, 348.2 15 

Education 349 5 

Electives 8 



90 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 

EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR MEN AND WOMEN 



Freshman 

Hours 

English 2x-y 10 

Education 103 5 

Human Biology 1-2 10 

Speech 8 or 50 5 

Political Science 1 5 

Mathematics lOlx or lOly 5 

Sociology 5 or Psychology 1 5 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 

Physical Education 1 (for men) 

or 
Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 
Elective 3 



Sophomore 

Hours 

English 22x-y 10 

History HOx-y 10 

Chemistry 21-22** 10 

Physical Education 18-19 6 

Physical Education 40a-b-c (men) 9 
Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

Physical Education 2 (for men) 

or 
Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 

Electives (women) 12 

Electives (men) . 3 



53 



53 



'*Ten hours of science in another field may be substituted in the Recreation Area. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



301 



Junior and Senior Requirements 
Concentration Areas 

Although a student will receive training in each one of the fields, Health, 
Physical Education, and Recreation, he must, with the approval of his adviser 
and Head of the Department, set up a program in one of the Concentration 
Areas at the beginning of the junior year or earlier. 



I. Physical Education 

This concentration area is de- 
signed for the student inter- 
ested in preparing for teach- 
ing or administration of phy- 
sical education programs. 

Hours 

Education 304, 335.3, 336.3 15 

Education 346.3, 347.3, 348.3, 349 29 
Physical Education (Women) 307, 

352a-b-c, 353a-b-c 23 

Physical Education (Men) 

380a-b-c, 381a-b-c 18 

Physical Education 372, 360, 361, 

383, 384* 18-21 

Zoology 312a-b ..10 

Electives (Men) Recom. Physical 

Education 307, 311, 377 12 

Electives (Women) Recom. 
Physical Education 311, 
315, 384 6-9 



II. Health Education 

This concentration area is de- 
signed for the student inter- 
ested in professional prepara- 
tion in school health educa- 
tion. 

Hours 

Education 304, 335.3, 336.3 15 

Education 346.3, 347.3, 348.3, 349_.___.20 
Physical Education (Women) 307, 

352a-b-c, or 353a-b-c .. 14 

Physical Education (Men) 

381a-b-c 9 

Zoology 312a-b 10 

Physical Education 360, 361 10 

Physical Education 371, 372, 383 .13 

Related Fields 8 

Electives (Men) 9 



90 
III. Recreation 

This concentration area is 
planned for the student who 
is interested in the field of 
recreation. 

Hours 

Education 304, 335.3, 336.3 15 

Education 346.3, 347.3, 348.3, 349....20 
Physical Education 372, 384, 385, 

311, 386, 387 20 

Physical Education 381a-b-c (men) 9 
(Women) Select from Physical 
Education 307, 352a-b-c, 

353a-b-c or other electives 19 

Sociology 10 

Fine Arts ..5 or 8 

Industrial Arts 5 

Electives (Men) 8 

96 



90 
IV. Dance 

This concentration area is 
planned for the student who 
is interested in obtaining a 
foundation in the elements of 
creative dance leading to pro- 
fessional activity in dance 
education. 

Hours 

Education 304, 335.3, 336.3 15 

Education 346.3, 347.3, 348.3, 349_._ 20 
From Physical Education 307, 

352a-b-c, 353a-b-c, 315* 12 

Physical Education 360-361 10 

Physical Education 311, 357, 358, 

359, 368, 399 20 

Zoology 312a-b 10 

Electives 9 

96 



♦Women students select 12 hours from activity courses. 



302 



THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
AGRICULTURE WITH A MAJOR IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



Freshman 

Hours 

Agricultural Economics 4 5 

Animal Husbandry 1 - 3 

Botany 21-22 (for agricultural 

students) - ..10 

Chemistry 21-22 (for agricultural 

students ) 10 

Dairy Husbandry 3 3 

English 2 x-y 10 

Forestry 2 3 

Poultry Husbandry 60 5 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 
Physical Education 1 



Sophomore 

Hours 

Agricultural Economics 10 3 

Agricultural Engineering 20-60-70 9 

Agronomy 1 5 

Agronomy 10 5 

English 6 5 

Horticulture 1 5 

Mathematics lOlx or lOly 5 

Physics 20 5 

Political Science 1 5 

Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 
Physical Education 2 



54 
Junior 

Hours 

♦Science Selection 20 

Bacteriology 350 __. 5 

Plant Pathology 353 5 

Animal Husbandry 382 5 

Plant Pathology 358 5 

Zoology 374 5 



52 
Senior 

Hours 

Major 25 

Education 335.1 5 

Education 336.1 .. 5 

Education 346.1 5 

Education 347.1 — 5 

Education 348.1 5 



Minor No. 1 



.10 Minor No. 2 



10 



Agricultural Economics 301— 5 

Agronomy 458 5 

Other requirements — 15 

Education 303 6 

Food Processing 363 5 

Animal Husbandry 373 5 



Two courses in any technical de- 
partment of the College of Agri- 
culture with approval of adviser. 

Other requirements —10 

Education 304 5 

Education 349 5 



45 



46 



•Mathematics 356 or Chemistry 346 may be substituted for any course in this group 
with approval of the student's adviser. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 303 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

(Peabody Hall, North Campus) 

The University reserves the right to withdraw any course for which 
the. registration is not sufficient, and to offer courses not here listed should 
sufficient demand arise and teaching facilities and personnel be available. 

Unless otherwise indicated all courses will meet five times a week and 
carry a credit of five hours. 

Students who register for Education courses in the Atlanta Area Teacher 
Education Service Center may do so in units of 2 y 2 quarter hours each. The 
first unit will be identified by the letter "a"; the second unit by the letter 
"b". 

A. Courses in Education for Undergraduate Students 

Basic Courses in Education 

The basic courses in education may be sectioned in accordance with the teaching- 
objective of the student. Sectioning- will be done in 335. 336, 346. 347. and 348, and 
may be done in other basic courses in education. Point and figure after the course 
number will designate section. For example, "335.1" denotes the section for agriculture 
teachers ; "335.4" denotes the section for elementary teachers. Below are the numbers 
for the different kinds of sections : 

.1 agricultural; .2 home economics; .3 health and physical education: .4 elementary; 
.5 high school ; .6 industrial arts ; .7 distributive education ; .8 library service ; .9 
art education; .10 music education. 

103. An Introduction to Personal and Professional Development. Reg- 
ular class and laboratory periods. Mr. Hudgins and selected members of the 
Staff. 

This course Is designed for freshmen who expect to teach. Each student will be 

fiven the opportunity to make an occupational choice and to undertake a compre- 
ensive and systematic study of his choice in relation to personal and professional 
development. Students will have opportunities, through a full program of testing and 
counseling, to analyze their own needs in such areas as health, reading, creative 
writing, and computation. Guidance will be provided in terms of the student's needs. 
Help will be given in improving study habits and in budgeting time. The duties and 
responsibilities of teachers will be studied as a basis for determining competencies 
and proficiencies which should be acquired. 

Students will acquaint themselves with the program of the University, the public 
school programs in the state, and the resources of the local community that con- 
tribute to an improved instructional program. Some emphasis will be given to the 
development of the American school. Opportunities for observation of and partici- 
pation in the program of the University Demonstration School will be provided in 
this course. 

304. Educational Psychology. The Staff. 

Special emphasis in this course is placed upon developing competencies on the part 
of prospective elementary and high school teachers in understanding and applying 
the psychological principles involved in the growth and development of children and 
youth. The University Demonstration School will be used as a laboratory for students 
in this course. 

335. Curriculum Planning. Prerequisite: Education 103 or equivalent. 
The Staff. 

The purpose of this course is to develop the ability of the student to engage in 
curricular activities of the public schools. Emphasis is placed upon procedures for lo- 
cating, organizing, and summarizing data concerning social, economic, and personal 
problems to serve as a guide in formulating curricular activities with youth and 
adults based upon their needs and interests. Several methods of formulating cur- 
ricular programs are studied and evaluated. Directed observation will be carried on in 
the University Demonstration School and other selected schools. Interests and needs 
of the students taking this course will be cared for in two ways. First, they will be 
sectioned according to their major interests; that is, vocational agriculture, home- 
making, health education, and the general teachers in the elementary and high 
school*. Second, within each section students will be permitted and encouraged to 
emphasize the type of work in which they expect to engage; for example, some may 
be interested in the primary, others in the intermediate levels of instruction, and 
still others in social science or science on the high school level. 



304 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

336. Teaching Pbocedubes. Prerequisite: Education 103 or equivalent. 
The Staff. 

The purpose of this course is to evaluate the teaching procedures used by the teach- 
ers iu the public schools. Attention is given to techniques used in teaching pre-pri- 
mary, primary, intermediate, and high school groups; out-of-school youth groups; 
and adult groups. The University Demonstration School and other selected schools 
are used for observation. Observations of out-of-school youth and adult groups are 
made when practicable. Individual interests and needs of students enrolled in this 
course are provided for by sectioning in the same manner as in Education 335. 

346, 347, and 348. Apprentice Teaching. 15 hours. Prerequisites: Educa- 
tion 335 and 336. Off-campus Centers. The Staff. 

The program of apprentice teaching is a cooperative undertaking between the Uni- 
versity and selected school sj^sterns. The threefold purpose is: (1) to give college 
students experience in actual problems of teaching in normal situations, (2) to aid 
teachers in service, and (3) to assist faculty members of the College of Education 
in understanding the actual problems in the field for which they are aiding in the 
preparation of teachers. 

The public schools and the supervising teachers used in the program are carefully 
selected by the College of Education and are located in the several areas of the state. 
Bach school selected provides facilities and opportunities for the participation of ap- 
prentices in the teaching program of that school. The student, for a quarter, becomes 
a resident of the selected school community and an apprentice to the supervising 
teacher. He participates in all the responsibilities carried by his supervising teacher, 
engaging in a total program of teaching activities, gradually advancing from ob- 
server to participant and finally to full responsibility as a teacher. His work is under 
the joint guidance of the local teaching staff and members of the University faculty. 

349. Seminar in Education. Prerequisite: Apprentice Teaching. The 
Staff. 

This is a seminar dealing with problems emerging from experiences in apprentice 
teaching. Emphasis will be placed upon the planning of a total school program, and 
the place and responsibilities of each member in the school. Special attention will be 
given to the work of the public schools in relation to the needs and interests of the 
community, the nation, and the world. 

Additional courses in Education. 

301. Public Education. Mr. Ritchie. 

A study of public education in Georgia and the Southeast. This course is for pros- 
pective citizens who will be taxpayers, patrons of schools, and members of school 
boards, as well as for prospective teachers. 

303. Individual Analysis and Professional Planning. (No credit allowed 
if student has credit for Education 103 or equivalent.) Mr. Hudgins and 
selected members of the Staff. 

This course is planned for upper-classmen who have not had Education 103 or 
equivalent. Through a full program of testing and counseling students will make a 
systematic study of their needs in relation to personal and professional development. 
Study habits will be analyzed and guidance will be given in improving study habits 
and in budgeting of time. Opportunities will be provided for students to study the 
duties and responsibilities of teachers working in the total school program. Students 
will be expected to choose a teaching field and to plan a professional program in 
terms of this choice. 

890. School Administration for Teachers. Prerequisites: Three courses 
in education. Mr. Smith and Mr. Travelstead. 

This course deals with the administrative duties of teachers and with the guidance 
of out-of-class activities of pupils. 

Music 302. Methods of Teaching Public School Music. For education 
majors only. Miss Smith. 

A course of music fundamentals designed for grade teachers. 

Music 312. Methods of Teaching Music in the Elementary School. Pre- 
requisite: Music 302. Fine Arts Building. Miss Smith. 

Music 313. Methods of Teaching Music in Junior and Senior High 
Schools. Fine Arts Building. Miss Smith. 

Home Economics 304. Nutrition Education for Teachers. Prerequisite: 
Senior college standing. Miss Beall and Miss Moore. 

A study of the diet habits of Georgia school children and the relation of nutrition 
to health. Emphasis is placed on how all teachers working in their classrooms, in 
schools and in communities, can enrich school programs and improve the health of 
school children through nutrition education. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 305 

Abt 100. Art Principles. Five laboratory periods. Miss Browne. 

The course builds an understanding of the fundamentals of design and composi- 
tion. Students learn to use creatively the basic art materials appropriate for public 
schools. Awareness of art quality is also fostered by gallery visits and lectures illus- 
trated by work of artists and children. Headings and discussions encourage a sound 
attitude toward art and art education. 

Art 413. Crafts. Five laboratory periods. Miss Amos. 

The course develops ability to design 3-dimensionally in terms of material, pro- 
cess, and use. According to the needs of individual students, work is done in clay 
modeling, puppetry, papier mache. textile printing, simple weaving, and loom con- 
struction. Use of native materials is stressed. Students have contact with craft pro- 
grams for children. The course is planned to meet the needs of teachers. 

Art 414. Drawing and Painting. Five laboratory periods. Miss Browne 
and Mr. Williamson. 

Students in this course relate their own work in drawing, pictorial composition, 
color, and technique to the problems of teaching painting. Through readings, dis- 
cussions and visits, students study the role of art experience as a means of personal 
development. Emphasis is placed upon the relationship of art to curricular patterns 
of the public school. 

Art 415. Design. Five laboratory periods. Miss Browne and Mr. William- 
son. 

Design as basic to all art activities. 

Art 416. Modeling and Carving. Five laboratory periods. The Staff. 
The course offers experience in three-dimensional design with materials readily 
available for teachers. 

Art 423. Materials and Design. Five laboratory periods. The Staff. 
(Scheduled only with consent of adviser). 

An advanced course offering opportunity to work in one or more of the follow- 
ing fields: pottery, weaving, silk-screen printing, metal working. 

Art 440. Art Activities in the Elementary School. Mr. Williamson. 

Students in this course relate their own creative work in composition, painting, 
designing, and making in two and three dimensional materials to their problems in 
teaching art. 

B. Courses in Education for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates. 
(Courses numbered 400-600 may be taken by advanced undergraduates. 
Courses 600 and above are for graduate students. ) 

790. Educational Administration. Prerequisites: Four courses in educa- 
tion. Mr. Dotson, Mr. Sprowles, Mr. Smith, Mr. Travelstead, and Mr. Wil- 
liams. 

Basic course for those preparing for administrative positions. Among the topics 
treated are: the function of education in a democracy, the legal bases of a school 
system, boards of education, organization of a school 'system, business management, 
curriculum making, improvement of instruction, the school plant, relations with the 
public, adult education. Attention will be directed primarily to the organization ami 
administration of schools in the South. 

791. Educational Administration. Mr. Dotson. Mr. Smith, Mr. Travel- 
stead, and Mr. Williams. 

The second basic course for those preparing for administrative positions. The topics 
treated are: business management, curriculum making, improvement of instruction, 
the school plant, relations with the public, and adult education. 

794. School Administration. Prerequisites: Four courses in education. 
Mr. Dotson, Mr. Sproivles, Mr. Smith. Mr. Travelstead. and Mr. Williams. 

A course dealing with the duties of school principals, organization and administra- 
tion of the individual school, the principal's responsibility for the curricula of his 
school and for supervision, the principal's relationships. Not open to students who 
have credit for Education 793. (794.4 will be used for Elementary School Principals; 
794.5 for Secondary School Principals.) 

795. State and County School Administration. Prerequisite: Four 
courses in education including Education 790 or equivalent. Mr. Dotson, Mr. 
Purcell, Mr. Smith, and Mr. Williams. 

The relation of the Federal Government to education: the State Department of 
Education and the functions of its various divisions: local units of administration: 
the relationships of the superintendent: county boards of education: school law: 
certification of teachers; the county unit system; consolidation and transportation. 



306 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

797. The School Plant. Prerequisites: Four courses in education and 
two courses in school administration. Mr. Smith, Mr. Sprowles, and Mr. 
Williams. 

An intensive study of the operation and maintenance of the school plant. 

798. School Finance and Business Management. Prerequisite: Educa- 
tion 790. Mr. Purcell, Mr. Smith, and Mr. Williams. 

Problems of financing a school system; school revenues: budget making; school 
costs; insurance; financial accounting, records, and reports; management of school 
plant, equipment, and supplies. 

824. School Personnel. Prerequisite: Four courses in education, includ- 
ing Education 790 or 794. Mr. Hudgins, Mr. Smith, and Mr. Williams. 
The administration of the school staff, selection, salary schedule, tenure, etc. 

CURRICULUM 

504. Fundamentals of the- Curriculum. Prerequisites: Four courses in 
education. Miss Burnham, Miss Cox, Mr. Morris, and Mr. Travelstead. 

An introductory course in the basic principles of curriculum planning as found 
in psychology, sociology, economics, and education. Application is made to Georgia 
schools and schools of the Southeast. 

506. Curriculum Planning. Prerequisites: Four courses in education. 
Miss Burnham, Miss Cox, and Mr. Morris. 

Problems of the curriculum of elementary and secondary schools in the post-war 
period. Special application to Georgia schools and schools of the southeastern states. 
Education 504 should precede this course unless it is waived by consent of the in- 
structor. 

662. The Community School. Mr. Dotson, Mr. Goodlad, and Mr. Jordan. 

The primary purpose of this course is to prepare selected school personnel, es- 
pecially principals, for participation in planning and developing educational pro- 
grams. The concept of the community school will be emphasized. Procedures will be 
developed for enlisting teachers and laymen in planning more adequate use of human 
and other resources in studying the school community as a basis for the develop- 
ment of an educational program to meet the needs of the people. A critical exami- 
nation will be made of the literature and experiences of planning groups in America 
and other parts of the world. 

804. Curriculum Foundations. Prerequisites: Four courses in education, 
(ot open to students who have had Education 504.) Mr. Morris. 

This course, for graduate students only, deals with the foundations of the cur- 
riculum as found in the fields of psychology, economics, government, sociology, and 
education. A first course. 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

502. Advanced Educational Psychology. Mr. Aaron, Mr. Garrison, and 
Mr. Greene. 

A consideration of the practical applications of the scientific findings of educa- 
tional psychology to the more complex problems involved in the growth and develop- 
ment of learners. 

511. Problems in Educational Psychology. Prerequisite: Education 304. 
Mr. Aaron, Mr. Bledsoe, Mr. Garrison, and Mr. Greene. 

A course designed to provide opportunities for the advanced student to secure 
specialized training in selected areas of educational psychology, e. g., individual dif- 
ferences, motivation, evaluation procedures, etc. 

552. Psychology of Childhood. Prerequisite: Education 304 or equivalent. 
Mr. Garrison, Mr. Greene, Mrs. Sutton. 

A course designed to develop functional skills in understanding the interests, needs, 
and abilities of elementary pupils and in evaluating the total development of ele- 
mentary pupils. 

555. Psychology of Adolescence. Prerequisite: Education 304 or equiva- 
lent. Mr. Aaron, Mr. Bledsoe, Mr. Garrison, Mr. Greene. 

A course designed to develop functional skills in understanding the interests, needs, 
and abilities of adolescents and in evaluating the total development of adolescents. 

636. Fundamentals of Child Study. Mr. Shufelt. 

This course is designed to give the teacher the techniques of learning to study 
a child. The content will have to do with the history and purposes of child study, 
the basic assumptions and philosophies, the necessary scientific knowledge, planning 
to make tentative and alternative hypotheses about the causes of specific bits of 
behavior and learning, spotting recurring patterns of behavior, and processing a 
case record in terms of developmental tasks and adjustment problems indicated by 
recurring behavior and situations. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 3_07 

684. Advanced Child Study. Prerequisite: Four courses in education in- 
cluding Education 636. Mr. Shufelt. 

Emphasis is placed on the scientific interpretation of a case record. An organizing 
framework of six dynamic areas is introduced, namely : physiological processes, af- 
fectional processes, peer group processes, socialization processes, self-developmental 
processes, self-adjustive processes. The framework serves two purposes : it provides 
a way of organizing the facts in the individual child's record; it provides a way 
of organizing the scientific principles and generalization which will explain the 
child's behavior and which are developed through lectures and directed reading. 

EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND MEASUREMENTS 

515. Statistical Methods in Education. Mr. Aaron, Mr. Bledsoe, Mr. 
Garrison, and Mr. Greene. 

A course designed to develop an understanding of the appropriate uses of statistical 
methods in education and to develop basic skills needed in the analysis of quantitative 
data in education. 

556. Educational Tests and Measurements. Prerequisites: Four courses 
in education. Mr. Aaron, Mr. Bledsoe, and Mr. Ritchie. 

Nature and function of measurement, the traditional examination, new-type tests, 
standardized tests, surveys and diagnostic tests, remedial teaching based upon diag- 
nostic tests, measure of central tendency, measures of variability, tests and the class- 
room teachers, tests and the administrator. 

615. Problems in the Evaluation of Instruction. Mr. Greene. 

This course will deal with the nature and function of measurements, the traditional 
examination, new type tests, standardized tests, surveys and diagnostic tests, ob- 
servational techniques, and other criteria. Special emphasis will be given to the 
interpretation of the results secured from evaluative technique. 

816. Methods and Applications of Educational Research.* Mr. Bledsoe, 
Mr. Garrison, and Mr. Greene. 

An appraisal of the techniques and procedures of research in education, with special 
applications to problems involved in conducting and reporting the research studies 
of graduate majors in education. 

818. Evaluation in Education. (No credit allowed if student has credit 
for Education 615). Prerequisites: Four courses in education and consent of 
the instructor. Mr. Bledsoe, Miss Cox, Mr. Greene, Mr. Morris, and Mrs. 
Sutton. 

A course dealing with the construction and application of various types of evalua- 
tive instruments: check lists, rating scales, anecdotal records, questionnaires, pro- 
jective techniques, standardized and non-standardized tests. 

826. Critique of Educational Literature. Prerequisites**: Four courses 
in education. Mr. Bledsoe, Mr. Garrison, Mr. Greene, and Mr. Williams. 

This course is designed to develop abilities in the critical interpretation and evalua- 
tion of research and theoretical writing in the field of education. Each student will 
be expected to make a number of critical reviews of significant educational literature 
in the area of his specialization. 

830. Investigation in Supervision. Prerequisites: Four courses in edu- 
cation and consent of instructor. Miss Cox, Mr. Singleton, Mr. Smith, and 
Mrs. Sutton. 

The purpose of this course is to give advanced graduate students an opportunity 
to do research on instructional procedures. Such problems as the comparison of two 
methods- of teaching, the evaluation of instructional materials, or the evaluation of 
supervisory programs, may be studied. Supervisors and those planning to enter super- 
visory work will find this course of practical assistance. 

900. Thesis and Dissertation Seminar. Non-credit. Prerequisites: Four 
courses in education and advanced graduate standing. The Staff. 

All candidates for graduate degrees will enroll for this course without credit. Op- 
portunities will be provided for critical consideration of investigations being made 
by graduate students majoring in education. 



•Undei exceptional circumstances, upon recommendation of major professor and 
with approval of the Dean, Education 826 may be substituted for 816 if the training 
needs of the student seem to justify same. 

••Under exceptional circumstances, upon recommendation of major professor and 
with approval of the Dean, Education 816 may be substituted for 826 if the train- 
ing needs of the student seem to justify same. 



308 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

916, 917, 918. Educational Research. 5-15 hours. Prerequisites: Four 
courses in education and graduate standing. Authorized members of College 
of Education Staff. 

These courses provide opportunity for the student doing advanced graduate work 
to carry on individual investigation in the fields of his specialization under the 
guidance of the faculty member or members particularly qualified in the field under 
consideration. 

921. Laboratory in Applied Education. Prerequisites: Four courses in 
education. The Staff. 

This course is designed to provide opportunities for advanced students to undertake 
functional studies of topics or problems in education significantly related to their 
professional tasks. For most students it will involve supervised field work in the 
attempt to solve one or more practical school problems related to their normal duties. 

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING 

520. Fundamentals of a Guidance Program. (No credit allowed if stu- 
dent has credit for Education 621, 622, or 672, or 872.) Miss Bledsoe, Mr. 
Hudgins, and Mrs. Marbut. 

This course is designed for the purpose of identifying representative educational, 
vocational, and personal problems of individuals and planning a program of guid- 
ance service that will best assist individuals in solving these problems. A study 
will be made of each of the areas of guidance services and their relationships. This 
course is planned as an introduction to professional training for counselors and as 
an opportunity for teachers and principals to acquire an overview of guidance func- 
tions in the total school program. 

521. Analysis of the Individual. (No credit allowed if student has credit 
for Education 624, 625, or 872.) Miss Bledsoe, Mr. Hudgins, and Mrs. Mar- 
but. 

Emphasis in this course is placed on the study and use of techniques for discover- 
ing characteristics of individuals. Students registering for this course will be ex- 
pected to develop competencies in recording, analyzing, correlating, and interpreting 
data as they relate to counseling. 

523. Counseling. Prerequisites: Four courses in education and one course 
in guidance. Miss Bledsoe and Mr. Hudgins. 

The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for students to develop 
abilities for dealing with problems of individuals in counseling situations. Regis- 
trants for the course will aid in making personal analysis to determine interview 
techniques to be used. The place of catharsis in psychotherapy and counseling will 
be investigated. Practice in using the interview in obtaining information, giving in- 
formation, and changing attitudes will be provided. 

524. Educational and Occupational Information. Prerequisite: Four 
courses in education and consent of instructor. Mr. Hudgins and Staff. 

This course comprises a study of the nature, sources and functions of information 
about educational and occupational opportunities, their relationship and use in assist- 
ing individuals to formulate comprehensive plans in these areas. An examination 
and evaluation will be made of techniques for discovering, collecting, filing, inter- 
preting, and using this information in counseling. Practice in the use of these tech- 
niques will be emphasized. Making community surveys and follow-up studies will 
be considered as a means of securing pertinent information. 

METHODS OF TEACHING 

401. Problems in the Teaching of Reading. Mr. Callaway and Mrs. Sut- 
ton. 

This advanced course in the teaching of reading will familiarize the student with 
the major causes underlying disability in reading and will guide him in planning 
a program that will to some extent prevent difficulties from arising. The student 
will be enabled, through observation and participation, to diagnose reading diffi- 
culties in the classroom and to plan a corrective program of instruction based on that 
diagnosis. Students will become familiar with the significant body of research that 
indicates the important recent trends in the field of reading. 

410. The Use of Audio- Visual Aids in Education. Prerequisites: Four 
courses in education. Mr. Bricker and Mr. Ritchie. 

A course in visual education, a study of the value and needs of visual instruction, 
equipment needed for visual instruction, the selection of visual material, general 
techniques of visual instruction, sound films, slides, opaque projections, and other 
visual classroom aids. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 3 09 



411. Laboratory in the Production of Audio- Visual Aids. Prerequisites: 
Four courses in education or consent of the instructor. Mr. Bricker and 
Mr. Ritchie. 

Stresses tbe development of skills in the production of various types of audio- 
visual aids. 

481. (French or Spanish). Problems of Teaching Romance Languages. 
Prerequisite: French or Spanish 201-202 or 15 hours of education in addition 
to French or Spanish 104. Mr. Boveg. 

Historv of method, psychology of language learning, values, objectives, teacher's 
library, 'technique of oral work, pedagogy of phonetics, phonetics applied to gram- 
mar, pedagogy of vocabulary, tests and measurements. Evaluation of texts, course 
intent. 

604. Guiding the Reading of Children. Mrs. Dolvin. 

The study of literature and methods of reading guidance for children is based 
upon a careful consideration of their needs and interests. Books are discussed in 
relation to broad areas of interest. By means of individual projects, emphasis may 
be placed upon the problems of particular students. 

631. Problems in Vocal Music Education. 2% hours. 

Detailed study of voice problems from classroom point-of-view, beginning in ele- 
mentary and continuing through secondary school; techniques used in choral ensem- 
bles; evaluation of present concepts and practices. 

632. Problems in Instrumental Music Education. 2% hours. 

Study of techniques used for development of the instrumental music program, be- 
ginning in elementary and continuing through secondary school; diagnosis of prob- 
lems relating to strings, woodwinds, brasses, and percussion instruments. 

633. Music Administration and Curriculum. 2V 2 hours. 

Development of music curriculum as part of general educational planning; evalua- 
tion of school curricula and how music can become a functional part; problems in 
music administration, personnel, finances, and equipment. 

634. Choral Music Materials. 2y 2 hours. 

Study of music literature available for use in public schools at all levels of instruc- 
tion; research in materials of various schools of composition and mediums which 
can be adapted for school use. 

635. Instrumental Muisc Materials. 2% hours. 

Evaluation of present materials available at all levels of instruction; research in 
materials of various mediums and schools of composition which can be adapted for 
school use. 

667. Diagnostic and Corrective Techniques in School Subjects. Prere- 
quisite: For advanced students well grounded in basic techniques in teaching. 
Mr. Jordan and instructors depending on the school subject involved. 

A study of techniques involved in locating blocks to the learning of children, and 
of procedures for overcoming such difficulties. Separate sections will be formed for 
the different school subjects and different age levels. A large amount of practice 
and individual investigations will be required. A mastery of the literature of ex- 
perimentation in a given field will be expected. 

717. Problems of Teaching. Prerequisites: Four courses in education. 
Miss Burnham, Miss Cox, Mr. Jordan, Miss Moore, and Mrs. Sutton. 

This course places special emphasis upon instructional procedures and evaluation 
of teaching in terms of child growth. Growth and the child's ability to use the skills 
and his ability to adjust socially and in the use of his creative ability will be em- 
phasized. 

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 

803. Philosophy of Education. Prerequisites: Four courses in educa- 
tion and consent of the instructor. Mr. Morris. 

Problems of educational objectives; sources of a science of education; a study of 
the principal and progressive movements in education. Education for a changing 
social order; the new philosophy and the school; the new curriculum; reconstruction 
of educational ideas. 



310 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

PLANNING EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

W560-W760. Educational Planning and Development. (No credit al- 
lowed if student has credit for Education 662). Workshops. Mr. Dotson and 

Staff. 

The primary purpose of these workshops is to prepare selected school personnel 
for participating in programs of educational planning and development. The par- 
ticipants will have an opportunity to formulate plans for carrying on educational 
development of programs at the local school and county level and in special areas. 
A maximum of three workshops (15 hours) may be taken by any one registered. 

The area of specialization of the registrant will determine which workshops are 
appropriate for him. Areas are indicated by the following subscripts : 

.0 Curriculum .12 Research and Measurements 

.1 Agriculture .13 Audio-visual Aids 

.2 Home Economics .14 Resource Use 

.3 Health & Physical Education .15 Nutrition Education 

.4 Elementary .51 Administration 

.5 High School .52 Supervision 

.6 Industrial Arts .53 Counseling 

.7 Distributive Education .54 Visiting Teacher 

.8 Library Service .55 Supervising Teacher 

.9 Art Education .56 Apprentice Teaching 

.10 Music Education .57 Corrective Techniques in School Sub- 

.11 Evaluation jects 

I SUPERVISION OF TEACHING 

730. Supervising of Teaching. Prerequisites: Four courses in education 
and consent of the instructor. Miss Burnham, Miss Cox, and Mr. Smith. 

This course is open to supervisors, teachers, administrators, and curriculum work- 
ers. The course includes a comprehensive study of all social institutions engaged in 
the instructional process. The work centers about ways and means of improving in- 
struction through an actual attack on selected instructional problems. 

846. Internship. Authorized members of the College of Education Staff, 
(Major Professor). 

This course is a cooperative undertaking between the University of Georgia and 
school sj'stems in the state. The purpose is to give the student carefully directed ex- 
perience in selected schools. It is a study-work program. At least sixty hours are 
spent during the course in a class or conference type of activity where critical study 
is made of problems encountered by the intern; the remainder of the time is spent 
in applying the principles learned to the regular job. Contributing to this program 
are consultants from other teacher-education institutions, the State Department of 
Education, experienced supervisors, county superintendents, principals, and teachers. 

847. Internship. Authorized members of the College of Education Staff, 
(Major Professor) . 

This course is a continuation of the study and practice begun in Education 846. 

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

641. Supervision of Diversified Cooperative Training. Mr. Haynes. 

A course intended for school superintendents and high school principals who have 
charge of diversified cooperative training classes, also for coordinators of such 
classes who anticipate supervisory responsibilities. Deals with federal and state re- 
quirements, budgetary control, social and labor legislation, evaluation of instruction, 
personnel and management, relations connected with the administration of diversified 
cooperative training. 

642. Supervision of Trade and Industrial Teaching. Mr. Haynes. 
Based on an analysis of the work of the vocational supervisors, this course will 

consider the functions of supervision and the necessary techniques and information 
which a supervisor must possess in securing the best results from the instruction 
which he supervises. Methods of appraising instruction and of training teachers will 
be emphasized. 

643. Curriculum Planning for Trade and Industrial Subjects. Mr. 
Haynes. 

A course for teachers and supervisors, dealing with specifications of the instruc- 
tional situation in terms of objectives and facilities: selection from suitable occu- 
pational analysis or other sources of content to be taught; typical teaching plans 
for various units of instruction; evaluation and accrediting of learner accomplish- 
ment. Special emphasis will be given to curricula for area vocational schools. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 311 

644. Coordination of Diversified Cooperative Training. Mr. Haynes. 

This course deals with procedures in organizing a diversified cooperative training 
program; selection and placement of trainees; analysis of job processes: organiza- 
tion of instructional material; methods of teaching: relationship with other phases 
of the high school program, with cooperating business establishments and with the 
public in general. 

646. Problems in Trade and Industrial Education. Mr. Haynes. 

The first unit of this course deals primarily with occupational analysis. In tnis 
connection various purposes and types of analyses as sources of teaching content for 
vocational subjects will be studied. The second unit of this course will deal with 
course organization. The topics in this unit will include specification of the teaching 
situation, nature of instruction units, use of occupational analysis, selecting both 
performance and informational content for the teaching situation and organization 
of this content into effective teaching sequence. The third unit of the course will 
deal with methods of teaching workshops. The topics studied will be the nature of 
performance learning, standards for learner accomplishments, methods of recording 
learner progress and demonstration of performance lessons. Each student will work 
out a list of performer lesson assignments and teaching plans in terms of the 
occupation which he is teaching. 

657. Techniques in Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education. 
Prerequisite: Four courses in education including Education 646 and con- 
sent of instructor. Mr. Haynes. 

This course deals with the techniques and principles of planning instructional pro- 
grams in Trade and Industrial Education. Studies will be made of shop organiza- 
tion, the use of information and reference materials in teaching and the preparation 
of instructional materials. The preparation of instructional materials will involve 
gathering and organizing information dealing with the programs of Trade and In- 
dustrial Education in the United States and other countries. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

771. Teaching Procedures in Vocational Education. Prerequisites: 
Four courses in education and consent of the instructor. Miss Beall, Miss 
Moore, Mr. O'Kelley, Miss Todd, and Mr. Toloert. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of those teachers of vocational agriculture 
and home economics who desire guidance in improving teaching procedures. Con- 
sideration is given to the development of curricula based on the needs and interests 
of students, the organization of the curricula into teaching units, the planning of 
units for instruction, teaching and evaluation. 

772. Evaluation in Vocational Education. Prerequisites: Four courses 
in education and consent of the instructor. Miss Beall, Miss Moore, Mr. 
O'Kelley, Miss Todd, and Mr. Toloert. 

This course has two primary purposes: (1) to guide teachers, supervisors, and ad- 
ministrators to develop the ability to evaluate departments and programs of voca- 
tional education in schools and communities, and (2) to guide teachers in the develop- 
ment of methods and techniques for evaluating their own instruction. Techniques for 
studying and evaluating departments are developed and used in evaluating one or 
more vocational programs in a selected school or schools. Consideration is given 
to setting up evaluative techniques for measuring student development and the appli- 
cation of these techniques to teaching situations. 

773. Supervision of Vocational Teaching. Prerequisites: Four courses 
in education and consent of the instructor. Miss Beall, Mr. Duncan, Miss 
Moore, Mr. O'Kelley, Miss Todd, and Mr. Toloert. 

In this course major emphasis is placed upon the following: (1) developing a point 
of view or philosophy of teacher education; (2) analyzing the present teacher train- 
ing program in vocational education in Georgia, to discover problem situations that 
may be used as a basis for teacher education programs. (3) determining the relative 
emphasis for each teacher-training agency to place upon the solution of the several 
problems in the teacher-education program, and (4) projecting plans for an appren- 
tice training program. 

871. Adult Education. Prerequisites: Four courses in education and con- 
sent of the instructor. Miss Beall, Miss Todd, and Mr. Tolbert. 

The primary purposes of this course are: (1) to develop a philosophy of adult 
education, (2) to develop techniques for discovering adult problems, and (3) to dis- 
cover and apply appropriate methods of organizing and teaching adult groups. The 
course is designed to meet the needs of experienced teachers, rural school supervisors 
and administrators, and other adult leaders. 

873. Problems in Vocational Education. Prerequisites: Four courses in 
education and consent of the instructor. Miss Beall, Miss Moore, Mr. O'Eelley, 
Miss Todd, and Mr. Toloert. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of experienced teachers of agriculture, 
teachers of home economics, and school administrators who want to get additional 
training in specific problems of teaching. The course is planned so that students 
may work at their special interest, individuality or in groups. 



312 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

C. Industrial Arts. 

20. General Shop. One single and four double periods. Mr. Harrison, Mr. 
Pollock. 

A general survey course for acquainting the student with a wide variety of ma- 
terials, tools, and procedures. Elementary work is done in metal, wood, drawing, 
electricity, and several crafts. 

22. Beginning Woodwork. One single and four double periods. Mr. Pol- 
lock and Mr. Nix. 

A course designed for persons majoring in education and planning to teach. In- 
cludes the planning, construction, and finishing of projects in wood. 

133. Industrial Arts for Teachers. One single and four double periods. 
Mr. Pollock and Mr. Nix. 

A course designed for persons majoring in education and planning to teach. Em- 
phasis is placed on the use of tools, materials, and procedures suitable for classroom 
work. 

150. Industrial Arts Drafting. One single and four double periods. Mr. 
Harrison, Mr. Pollock, and Mr. Nix. 

A course in which a study is made of reading and writing a graphic language. 
A portion of the time will be devoted to developing working" drawings which have 
application to industrial projects. 

323. Industrial Arts Design. One single and four double periods. Mr. 
Harrison. 

A course in which good industrial arts designs are studied and the principles under- 
lying good design are applied to plans developed by the students. 

324. Metal Work. One single and four double periods. Mr. Harrison, 
Mr. Pollock, and Mr. Nix. 

A beginning course in metal in which the use of hand tools with skill is empha- 
sized. The course includes the planning, construction, and finishing of projects in 
metal. 

325. Advanced Woodwork. One single and four double periods. Mr. Har- 
rison. 

A continuation of beginning woodwork with more emphasis on power machinery. 

328. Advanced General Shop. One single and four double periods. Mr. 
Harrison. 

A continuation of Education 20 in which the student works on advanced projects 
and gains experience in carrying on a general shop program. 

330. Advanced Drafting. One single and four double periods. Mr. Harri- 
son. Mr. Pollock. 

A continuation of beginning drafting. Advanced problems in drafting and machine 
design are studied. 

332. Advanced Industrial Arts for Teachers. One single and four double 
periods. Mr. Pollock. 

A course designed for leaders in popular arts and crafts. Thought will be given 
to the place and type of arts and crafts program suitable for adults, camp counselors, 
teachers, homemakers, and others interested in creative activities. 

340. Machine Drafting and Design. One single and four double periods. 
Mr. Harrison. 

Advanced problems will be developed in drafting, such as shape description, 
auxiliaries, sections, perspective, and map drawing. 

510. Principles of Industrial Arts Education. Mr. Harrison and Mr. 
Pollock. 

A course which will include the history, principles, function, organization, and 
evaluation of industrial arts education. 

550. Organization of Subject Matter in Industrial Arts. Mr. Harrison 
and Mr. Pollock. 

In this course necessary consideration will be given to the selection, organization, 
presentation, and interpretation of subject matter in industrial arts. Students will 
work out job plans, operation sheets, information sheets, and assignment sheets. 
Various industrial arts activities will be analyzed and appraised. Shop programs 
will be developed. 

560. Administration of Industrial Arts. Mr. Harrison. 

Interpretation <>f industrial arts curriculum in terms' of school and community 
needs. Organization and reorganization of shop programs. Cost accounting of ma- 
terials, equipment, supplies, and housing. Care and repair of tools and equipment. 
The duties of the industrial arts administration and supervisor. Shop planning and 
layouts. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 3JL3 

570. Special Problems in Industrial Arts. Mr. Harrison. 

A course designed primarily for experienced industrial arts teachers who feel a 
need for improving their curriculum and teaching procedures. A student may broaden 
and intensify his training in a particular area of interest. 

4. Distributive Education. 

308. Introduction to Distributive Education. 3 hours. Mr. Robins. 

A study of elements involved in the promotion, organization, and direction of dis- 
tributive education programs, with emphasis upon the analysis of retail training 
provisions and procedures as established by the George-Deen and George-Bardeu 
Acts. 

309. Psychology of Selling. Mr. Robins. 

The principles underlying the practice of salesmanship from the point of view of 
the buyer and seller. Application through discussion and demonstration of th» ele- 
ments of sales psychology including such topics as delevoping selling qualities, cus- 
tomer characteristics, buying motives, steps of the sale, increasing the average sale. 

310. Retail Personnel Training and Supervision. Mr. Robins. 

A course which will include methods of training in retail skills, tactual information 
and attitudes : the job of the supervisor in employee induction, follow-up and cor- 
rection : and supervisory effectiveness. 

356. Teaching Retail Management. Mr. Robins. 

Covers organization, policies, location, control, building and equipment, layout, 
and personnel problems of the retail store. Emphasis placed on leadership and execu- 
tive training. 

607. Curriculum Construction in Distributive Education. 3 hours. 

A workshop devoted to the construction of teaching outlines for use in distributive 
education and store training classes. Analysis of factors employed in the selection 
and organization of course materials, construction of topical outlines with the related 
factors of teaching methods, time elements and printed materials. 

E. Library Education 

L.E. 303. Utilization of Library Materials. Prerequisites: Senior-college 
standing and consent of instructor. Mrs. Broadhurst. 

An introduction to the use of dictionaries, encyclopedias, indices, and similar 
reference books commonly found in the small library. Attention will be given to the 
use of the library as an information laboratory for the school or for the community. 
Practice problems in answering reference questions will be assigned. 

L.E. 304. Organization of Library Materials. Prerequisites: Senior-col- 
lege standing and consent of instructor. Mrs. Broadhurst. 

A course to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles of the organisa- 
tion of small libraries, with particular emphasis on the uses of printed catalogues and 
catalogue cards. Author entries, simple collation, subject headings, abridged Dewey 
Decimal Classification, and rules for filing will be included. 

L.E. 305. Administration of a Small Library. Prerequisites: Senior-col- 
lege standing and consent of instructor. Mrs. Broadhurst. 

A course to acquaint the student with overall relationships between the library and 
the institutions of which it is a part. Problems of building, supplies, accounting, 
records and reports, personnel, discipline, routines, and the like will be discussed. 

L.E. 401. Library Guidance for Teachers and Administrators. Pre- 
requisite: Education 335, 33G, and two additional approved courses in Edu- 
cation. Mrs Broadhurst. 

A non-technical course for prospective teachers, and administrators interested in 
the relation of the school library to modern teaching methods, and designed pri- 
marily to inform them of library methods in their special fields. All types of enrich- 
ment materials are included and bibliographic work is introduced through problems 
chosen by the students. The completion of special problems will be required of students 
of graduate standing. 

L.E. 402. Principles of Book Evaluation. Prerequisites: Education 
335, 336 and two additional approved courses in Education. Mrs. Broadhurst. 

An introduction to the principles of evaluating books in terms of the clientele of 
the library for which they are to be purchased, with special emphasis on the school 
library and the small public library. Problems in the use of reviewing and indexing 
publications will be used in acquainting students with methods of selecting books 
for purchase. The completion of special problems will be an added requirement of 
graduate students. 

L.E. 406. Experiencing Literature with Children. Prerequisite: Edu- 
cation 335. 336 and two additional approved courses in Education. Mrs. 
Broadhurst. 

A consideration of the literature suitable for children and adolescents, with special at- 
tention to reading interests at the various age levels. Extensive reading and exami- 
nation of standard and current books will be required of all students. The completion 
of special problems will be an added requirements for graduate students. 



314 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



F. Health and Physical Education. 

Services Courses 

1-2. Physical Education. 10 hours. 

Women. Three hours a week for six quarters. Physical Education Build- 
ing, South Campus and Pound Auditorium, West Campus. Physical Educa- 
tion Staff. 

Women students may select activities which best meet their special needs and in- 
terests based upon their health, organic fitness, and previous experience in physical 
education. The activities include archery, badminton, basketball, body mechanics, 
bowling, creative dance, field hockey, folk dancing, fundamentals of movement, golf, 
horseback riding, recreational games, Softball, soccer, swimming, tennis, tumbling, 
volleyball, and others. 

Men. Three hours a week for six quarters. Stegeman Hall. Physical Edu- 
cation Staff. 

The physical fitness and swimming tests will be given each quarter. Activities in- 
clude touch-football, soccer, speedball, volleyball, swimming, badminton, tennis, golf, 
horseback riding, basketball, tumbling, apparatus, Softball, track and field, weight 
lifting, and others. 

Professional Courses 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

40a-b-c. Skill Techniques for Men. 9 hours (3 hours a quarter. Five 
periods a week required). Stegeman Hall and Memorial Hall. Mr. Gabriel- 
sen. 

This course provides demonstrations and practice, including methods and tech- 
niques, in teaching such activities as apparatus, tumbling, stunts and pyramids, 
aquatics, water safety, water shows, golf, and tennis. 

307. Physical Education in the Elementary School. South Campus. 
Miss Russell. 

This course is designed to help the teacher plan, teach, and evaluate physical edu- 
cation activities based upon an understanding of the unique contribution of physical 
education to the developing child, of learning sequences in fundamental physical 
skills, desirable safetv measures in activities such as games, rhythms and stunts. 

315. Aquatics. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Intermediate swimming or the 
consent of the instructor. South Campus. Miss Lewis. 

This course prepares students for the American Red Cross Instructor's Water Safety 
Course. It is recommended to students who are interested in camping activities. 

352 a-b-c. Team Sports for Women. 9 hours (3 hours a quarter). Pre- 
requisite: One quarter in each sport or consent of instructor. South Campus. 
Miss Lewis and Miss Russell. 

The student is given actual experience in coaching and officiating in class and 
intramural games. The Women's National Official Rating Examination will be given 
in volleyball, basketball, and softball. 

353 a-b-c. Physical Education Activities for Women. 9 hours (3 hours 
a quarter). Prerequisite: One quarter in the activity engaged in. South 
Campus. Miss Lewis and Miss Miller. 

Theory, practice, and technique of archery, tennis, soccer, and speedball. Study of 
dance as a basic medium of education. 

360. Kinesiology. South Campus. Prerequisite: Zoology 312a. Miss 
K easier. 

Application of the physical and physiological principles involved in body mechanics. 
Physical laws governing the manipulation of objects in sports are studied. 

361. Therapeutics of Exercise. South Campus. Prerequisite: Physical 
Education 360. Miss Keaster. 

The techniques of appraisal and guidance of pupils with faulty body mechanics, 
orthopedic defects, and other atypical conditions. Practice is given in the therapeutic 
use of exercise, massage, relaxation, and other physical modalities. 

372. History and Principles of Physical Education. Memorial Hall. 
Mr. Gabrielsen. 

A survey of the history and study of principles and trends in health, physical edu- 
cation and recreation, professional organizations, literature, and outstanding pro- 
grams. 

376. Organization and Administration. South Campus. (Same as Edu- 
cation 336.3). Mr. Gabrielsen and Mrs. Soule. 

Special emphasis and consideration of procedures, materials, and techniques to be 
used in setting up an effective physical education program. 



THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 315 

380 a-b-c. Theory, Coaching Methods, and Officiating of Major Sports. 
9 hours. (3 hours each quarter). Prerequisite: Senior level standing. Me- 
morial Hall. Coaching Staff. 

Theory and coaching techniques of major sports including football, basketball, base- 
ball, and track, are considered in this course. Various coaching systems, stressing 
their strong and weak points, the study of the various positions of the teams, as 
well as scheduling, transportation, diets, publicity, and other administrative prob- 
lems are covered. Participation in and planning of University Intramural Sports pro- 
gram, as well as officiating in the various sports, will be included. 

381 a-b-c. Skill Techniques fob Men. 9 hours. (3 hours each quarter. 
Five periods a week required). Stegeman Hall and Memorial Hall. Physical 
Education Staff. 

This course provides demonstration and practice in teaching methods and tech- 
niques in such activities as volleyball, badminton, handball, combatives, calisthenics, 
marching, relays, games of low organization, speedball, soccer, archery, table tennis, 
paddle tennis, deck tennis, and squash. 

383. Evaluation and Measurements. 3 hours. Memorial Hall. The Staff. 

A study of the methods in evaluating and testing physical education activities : 
procedures to be used in evaluating these tests and their results, including statistical 
analysis, are considered. 

513. Physical Education in the School Program. Prerequisites: Four 
courses in education. South Campus. Mr. Gabrielsen. Mr. Smith, and Mrs. 
Soule. 

Designed to help teachers and administrators to evaluate and understand the place 
of physical education in education. The needs of students, both individual and group, 
programs, equipment, facilities, and their relation to the school and the community 
are studied. 

714-715. (Workshop). Problems in Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation. 5 to 10 hours. Mr. Gabrielsen, Mr. Smith, and Mrs. Soule. 

A course of the workshop type dealing' with the problems met in the development 
of a comprehensive program of health education, physical education and recreation 
in the sehooi and school community. Special emphasis on problems identified by the 
student. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

19. First Aid and Treatment of Athletic Injuries. 3 hours. Memorial 
Hall. Mr. Wilson. 

A study of the problems and practical applications in first aid and the common, 
injuries received in athletic participation. 

344. Prohlems in Health Education. South Campus. Miss Keaster. 

Emphasis is placed upon the control of communicable diseases, safety education, 
nutrition, personal health problems, dental health education, and human relation- 
ships as they affect the growth and development of the child. Healthful environment, 
teachers' responsibility in health guidance, and ways to effective health instruction 
will also be considered. Designed for education majors and others interested in school 
and community health education. 

370. School Health Education. South Campus. Prerequisite: Educa- 
tion 304 and 20 hours in Science. (Same as Education 335.3). Mrs. Soule. 

Consideration of techniques for recognizing health needs and interests of people 
in relation to their environment: of pupil experiences and materials to meet these 
needs: of integrating classroom health activities with health resources in the com- 
munity. 

371. Personal and Community Health Problems. South Campus. Mrs. 
Soule. 

A study of current information in the areas of personal health and human relations, 
nutrition, mental health, sanitation, dental health, communicable diseases control, etc., 
as these apply to healthful living for individuals and groups. 

377. Safety Education. Memorial Hall. The Staff. 

This course deals with the problems, policies, principles, and methods involved in 
safety and accident prevention programs, as well as the programs of traffic safety 
and the teacher driver education and training in high schools. Individuals completing 
this course will be certified as driver education instructors by the State Department 
of Education. A charge of $2.30 will be paid by each enrollee to cover expenses. 

511. Health Education in School and Community. Prerequisite: Four 
courses in education. South Campus. Mr. Gabrielsen. Mr. Smith and Mrs. 
Soule. 

Analysis of problems in health education as they pertain to children in school and 
out of school, and to adults: the place of the classroom teacher and the school ad- 
ministrator in the health program. Opportunity for independent study will be pro- 
vided whenever possible. 



316 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

714-715. (Workshop) Problems in Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation. 5 or 10 hours. Mr. Gabrielsen, Mr. Smith, and Mrs. Soule. 

A course of the workshop type dealing with the problems met in the development 
of a comprehensive program of health education, physical education and recreation 
in the school and school community. Special emphasis on problems identified by the 
student. 

RECREATION 

18. Social Recreation. 3 hours. South Campus. The Staff. 

Discussions, participation, and practical experience in conducting social activities, 
including parties, folk games, skits, mixers, community sings, holiday celebrations, 
and special occasions. 

384. Interpretation of Recreation. 3 hours. Memorial Hall. Mr. Gabriel- 
sen. 

Current programs and practices in recreation are studied in relation to our social 
and economic culture. Opportunities are given to observe recreational programs in 
operation. 

385. Problems in Rural Recreation. 3 hours. Memorial Hall. The Staff. 
The use of community resources in planning for rural recreational programs. Ob 

servation of functioning programs will be made when possible. 

386. Camping Leadership. 3 hours. South Campus. Miss Lewis. 

The study of the duties and responsibilities of camp counselors, cabin counselings, 
and leadership techniques in program activities. 

387. Community Recreation. 3 hours. Memorial Hall. Mr. Gabrielsen. 
The study of the organization and administration of recreational programs which 

fill the leisure time needs of the total community. A review of several community 
programs will be made when possible. 

512. School and Community Recreational Programs. Prerequisite: Four 
courses in education. Memorial Hall. Mr. Gabrielsen, Mr. Smith, and Mrs. 
Soule. 

A study of philosophy, program materials, facilities, equipment, and general super- 
vision. Opportunities will be provided for observation, participation, and study of 
outstanding recreational programs. 

DANCE 

311. Folk Dancing. 3 hours. Prerequisite: One quarter of folk dance or 
permission of instructor. South Campus. Miss Lewis. 

This course provides opportunities for practice and direction in American and 
foreign Folk Dancing. 

Creative Dance. The introductory* as well as the following upper divi- 
sion courses provide the opportunity to study dance as creative and artistic 
expression of individual personality. 

357. Intermediate Dance Composition. 3 hours. Prerequisite: One quar- 
ter creative dance. South Campus. Miss Miller. 

The study of force, time, and space as the elements of expressive movement. Indi- 
vidual and group problems. 

358. Intermediate Dance Composition. 3 hours. Prerequisite: Two 
quarters of dance or consent of instructor. South Campus. Miss Miller. 

A continuation of 357 and including the study of visual design in relation to move- 
ment, rhythmic form and notation. 

359. Dance History. 3 hours. Prerequisite: One quarter in dance. South 
Campus. Miss Miller. 

Consideration is given to the history and theory of dance as education, recreation, 
and art: its relationship to other modes of human expression; and the study of 
representative dance forms from the primitive through more advanced periods of 
civilization. 

368. Dance Accompaniment. 3 hours. Prerequisite: One quarter of dance. 
South Campus. Miss Miller. 

Sound in relation to movement. Voice, sounds of the environment and various in- 
struments used in movement and accompaniment. 

399. Advanced Dance. Prerequisite: Physical Education 358 or consent of 
the instructor. South Campus. Miss Miller. 

Advanced problems in technique and composition including problems of produc- 
tion, costuming, and group direction. 

*A sequence of three introductory classes in Creative Dance is offered each quarter 
as a part of the service (Physical Education 1-2) program. These classes include 
both technique and composition. 



THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

THE FACULTY 
James Edward Gates, B.S., Ph.D., Dean. 
Robert Taylor Segrest, B.S.C., M.S.C., Associate Dean. 
Hope Swindel Sailors, Secretary. 



Alvix Blocksom Biscoe, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Dean 
of Faculties. 

♦Homer Augustus Black. B.B.A., M.B.A., C.P.A., Associate Professor of Ac- 
counting. 

Robert Preston Brooks, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Emeritus 
Dean of Faculties. 

James Whitney Bunting, B.S., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics 
and Director of the Bureau of Business Research. 

John Francis Burke, B.B.A., M.B.A., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting. 

John Elmer Champion, B.B.A., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

A. Aldo Charles, B.S., LL.B., M.Ed., D.Ed., Professor of Economics. 

Samuel Jefferson Cobb, Sr., B.B.A., M.B.A., Statistician, Bureau of Business 
Research. 

Morris William Hollowell Collins, Jr., B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of 
Political Science. 

**John Edward Dean, A.B., M.B.A., LL.B., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of 
Accounting. 

Robert David Entenberg. B.S.B.A., M.S.B.A., Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics. 

Robert David Froemke, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

James Teasley Frye, B.B.A., M.B.A., Temporary Instructor in Business Ad- 
ministration. 

James Edward Gates, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Dean of the 
College of Business Administration. 

John Stanley Gray, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Harold Milton Heckman, B.S.C., M.A., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting. 

Melvin Clyde Hughes. A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political 
Science. 

Robert Lorenz, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 



•On leave. 
'♦Resigned November 30, 1951. 

[317] 



318 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Lawrence John Nachtrab, B.S.A.E., CAA Rated, C.E., Associate Professor of 
Business Administration. 

Clio Crosby Norris, A.B., Assistant Director of the Bureau of Business Re- 
search. 

Merle Charles Prunty, Jr., B.S., A.B.. A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Geography 
and Geology. 

Einar Rasmussen, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Business Administration. 

♦Costic Roman, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Business Administration. 

Albert Berry Saye, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 

Gregor Sebba, Dr. of Pol. Sci., Dr. of Law, Professor of Economics. 

Robert Taylor Segrest, B.S.C., M.S.C, Professor of Economics and Associate 
Dean of the College of Business Administration. 

Howard Ross Smith, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

Glenn Wallace Sutton, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Finance. 

Emil Samuel Troelston, B.S., A.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

Laurence Henry Walker. B.S., M.Ed., Part-time Acting Assistant Professor 
of Economics. 



Omer Clyde Aderhold, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., President of the University. 
Alvtn Blocksom Biscoe, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of Faculties. 



Joseph Thomas Askew, Ph.B., M.A., LL.D., Dean of Student Affairs. 

Walter Newman Danner, Jr., B.S.A.E., M.S.A., Registrar and Director of Ad- 
missions. 

John Dixon Bolton, C.P.A., Comptroller and Treasurer. 



*Ou leave. 



THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 319 

ORGANIZATION AND PURPOSE 

The College of Business Administration was authorized by the Board of 
Trustees in 1912 and began operations in 1913. For many years it was 
called the School of Commerce. Since 1926 the College has been a member 
of the national standard-setting organization, The American Association of 
Collegiate Schools of Business. 

The primary aims of the College are to provide a foundation of general 
culture, to broaden the viewpoint and develop sound thinking and, at the 
same time, to supply practical training for students who wish to prepare 
for business and commercial careers. This training includes many courses 
designed to provide an understanding of the history and general principles 
that underlie the present economic organization of society, as well as courses 
devoted to special subjects of a technical character. Fields covered are ac- 
counting, aeronautical administration, general business, economics, finance, 
industrial relations, marketing, public administration, insurance and real 
estate, secretarial studies, economic statistics, and retailing. 

The curriculum of the College, however, is by no means restricted to 
purely economics and business courses. The requirement of the American As- 
sociation of Collegiate Schools of Business is that at least 40 per cent of the 
credit hours required for graduation must be in liberal or cultural courses. 
A list of courses of this character, so essential in the training of a well 
rounded college graduate, will be found under Degree Requirements. The 
degree of Bachelor of Business Administration is awarded upon completion 
of the four-year course. 

EQUIPMENT 

The College is housed in a modern, commodious, and attractive building, 
ronstructed for the joint occupancy of the College of Business Administra- 
tion and the School of Journalism. In 1948 a large addition was made to the 
building and the interior of the other portion was remodeled to provide 
necessary facilities for the increasing enrollment. 

The College of Business Administration Library has its own collection of 
material, which is additional to the facilities of the General Library. The 
collection contains economic and business publications. The College sub- 
scribes regularly to important periodicals in the general field of business, 
finance, and industry, including the statistical services of Babson Institute, 
Brookmire, Moody, and Standard and Poor. It has also a good pamphlet file 
and some of the outstanding financial and commercial newspapers. A full 
time librarian and several student assistants are in charge. 

The College of Business Administration is equipped with the various types 
of machines common in business: adding machines, bookkeeping machines, 
mimeograph equipment, and dictating machines. In addition, International 
Business Machines Corporation equipment is available for instructional pur- 
poses in the laboratories. The latest types of this punch card accounting 
machinery are included, such as sorters, punches, tabulators, and summary 
punches. Alphabetical punch card equipment has recently been added to 
the numeric machines. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

The first two years of a number of University curricula often provide for 
general courses, such as History llOx-y, (History of Western Civilization), 
English 22x-y, (Survey of European Literature), and others shown below as 
required in the curriculum of this College. Students who transfer with less 
than junior standing and without credit for the general courses required in 
this curriculum will be required to take them here unless they have credit 
for courses of equal value in the same fields. 

In the case of students who transfer with junior standing from standard 
colleges without these general courses, provisions are made for substitution 



320 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

of courses in the same fields. The junior-senior courses are arranged so that 
a student who has completed the freshman and sophomore years at a standard 
institution with satisfactory grades can ordinarily complete the Bachelor 
of Business Administration degree requirements in six quarters. 

Where a prospective student is in doubt as to the manner in which this 
rule works a letter of inquiry should be sent to the Dean, College of Business 
Administration. 

CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION 

A grade of "D" or "D plus," while giving hours credit, is considered by 
the faculty of the College of Business Administration to represent inadequate 
accomplishment in pursuing the specialized courses required for the B.B.A. 
degree. Candidates for the Bachelor of Business Administration degree must 
earn at least a grade of "C" in the following courses: 

Economics 5x and 5y; Business Administration 6x and 6y; Business Ad- 
ministration 8; the core curriculum; and at least four of the courses required 
in the major concentration group. Should a student receive a grade of "D" 
or "D plus" in any course that is prerequisite to another, he can register 
for the second course before he achieves the necessary minimum grade on 
the prerequisite only with the permission of his major professor. 

BUSINESS PRACTICE 

The College of Business Administration with the cooperation of certain 
business firms has arranged for a few carefully selected students to obtain 
actual experience in business while still pursuing work toward the degree 
of Bachelor of Business Administration. Such students, upon the recom- 
mendation of the professor in charge of the major concentration group, may, 
with the approval of the Dean of the College and the College Executive Com- 
mittee, be permitted to enter a cooperating business establishment in Atlanta 
or other city and spend a quarter in learning first hand something of the 
operation of the business. This arrangement is limited to selected students 
within 55 hours of graduation. A maximum of fifteen hours of elective credit 
will be given for the quarter. While absent from the University the students 
will be under supervision of their major professors. Grades for this work 
will depend upon the report by the head of the business as well as upon such 
written reports as may be required from the student. 

Application for permission to register for business practice (Business Ad- 
ministration 340) must be made through the student's major professor dur- 
ing the quarter preceding the planned registration. Students approved for 
this privilege will oe required to register in the usual way and pay the pre- 
scribed fees. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

The national honor society for students of schools of business, Beta Gamma 
Sigma fraternity, has a charter in practically every member institution of 
the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business. The Alpha chap- 
ter of Georgia was the sixth established of the forty-eight chapters now active. 
The purpose of this fraternity is to encourage and reward scholarship and 
achievement. Every year about ten percent of the seniors are awarded the 
Beta Gamma Sigma key. 

Business Administration students are eligible for election to The Honor 
Society of Phi Kappa Phi, and those who have a large proportion of their 
work in liberal arts subjects, including economics, are eligible for election 
to Phi Beta Kappa. 

The College also has chapters of the three leading professional organiza- 
tions for students of schools of business, the Alpha Kappa Psi, the Delta 
Sigma Pi, and the Phi Chi Theta fraternities. Delta Sigma Pi awards an- 
nually a key to the most distinguished Business Administration graduate 
of the year, while Phi Chi Theta awards a key to the most distinguished 



THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



woman graduate, and Alpha Kappa Psi awards a gold key each year to the 
male Business Administration student having the highest scholastic average 
during three years at the University of Georgia. 

The Economics Society is an organization in which membership is open 
to all students enrolled in the College of Business Administration who have 
an average grade of "C" or better. Students enrolled in other colleges who 
are interested in economics are invited to become members. 

BUREAU OF BUSINESS RESEARCH 

The College of Business Administration established a Bureau of Business 
Research in 1929. A program of research on specific economic and business 
problems of Georgia is carried on by both faculty members and students of 
the College. 

A monthly report on Retail Trade Trends in Georgia is prepared, showing 
variations for twelve kinds of businesses. Separate trends are calculated 
for Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus. Macon. Savannah, and Albany. Approxi- 
mately 60 stores cooperate by supplying monthly reports of their retail sales 
to the Bureau of Business Research. This program is carried on in coopera- 
tion with the Bureau of the Census. 

Georgia Business, a monthly review of business activity, is published by 
the Bureau. Statistical indexes showing changing economic conditions in 
the United States with particular attention to the effects upon Georgia are 
summarized. A composite index of business activity in Georgia is also pre- 
sented. The bulletin is available without charge to citizens of Georgia. 

Currently the Bureau of Business Research is devoting special attention 
to developing research facilities for use by the students and faculty of the 
College of Business Administration. The Bureau cooperates with state and 
federal agencies and private firms in conducting studies and distributing 
information on problems of economic interest to Georgia. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

In the Graduate School of the University the degrees of Master of Business 
Administration, Master of Science in Business Administration, and Master 
of Arts with a major in economics are offered. 

The Master of Business Administration is a professional degree designed 
for students intending to enter directly into business. Requirements are 
flexible to meet the needs of graduates of liberal arts colleges as well as 
professional and technical schools. A program of four quarters of graduate 
work will be necessary for applicants holding the B.B.A. degree or its equiva- 
lent and from four to six quarters for applicants holding degrees in other 
fields. Neither a thesis nor a reading knowledge of a foreign language is 
required under this program. At least fifteen hours of each student's pro- 
gram must be in courses numbered 800. 

Through special arrangement with the School of Journalism the degree of 
Master of Business Administration may be taken as a combination curriculum 
of the School of Journalism and the College of Business Administration, 
leading to the degree of A.B. in Journalism in four years, and the M.B.A. 
after an additional four quarters of study. This program is designed to aid 
those anticipating interpretative writing in economics and related fields, 
and also those who plan to work in the business phases of journalism. For 
details of this program see the bulletin of the School of Journalism. 

Graduate training in research methods is provided by a program leading 
to the degree of Master of Science in Business Administration. Based upon 
forty quarter hours of graduate work, a thesis, and a reading knowledge of 
a foreign language, this degree is specifically designed for students desiring 
experience in business and economic research. A minimum of three quar- 
ters of graduate work for applicants holding the B.B.A. degree or its 



322 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

equivalent is necessary. A major of twenty hours and one minor of ten 
quarter hours must be chosen from graduate courses in economics and busi- 
ness administration. One minor of ten quarter hours may be taken in a 
related field. The student has the opportunity of selecting a major from the 
specialized fields of accounting, economics, finance, industrial relations, 
marketing, public administration, and economic statistics. Fifteen hours 
of graduate study may be taken in other Schools and Colleges of the Uni- 
versity. 

The Master of Arts degree with a major in economics is available for 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science graduates who have the essential 
background in economics. It is also open to holders of the Bachelor of Busi- 
ness Administration degree who are qualified with respect to the language 
and other liberal arts requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

JUNIOR DIVISION 

The major part of the work in the freshman and sophomore years con- 
sists of general courses from the offerings of the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Courses of this type account for 73 of the 96 credit hours of the first two 
years. The purpose of these courses is to lay a broad foundation of cul- 
tural work so that the student may have some knowledge of history, govern- 
ment, science, and literature before undertaking specialized work. The re- 
maining 23 credit hours are given to necessary courses introductory to the 
specialized curricula of the junior and senior years. They are: 

Principles and Problems of Economics 10 hours 

Elementary Accounting 10 hours 

Business Correspondence 3 hours 

Orientation to Business hours 

In detail the work of the first two years is as follows: 

(Item references are to summary of total requirements as listed below). 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

English 2x-2y 10 English 22x-22y 10 

Mathematics lOlx, 102 8 Political Science 1 5 

(See Items 2 and 3) Business Administration 8 3 

Science (See Item 4) -—10 Science (See Item 4) 10 

Social Studies or Economics 5x-5y 10 

Foreign Language (See Item 5) -10 (See Item 11) 

History HOx-llOy 10 Business Administration 6x-6y 10 

Business Administration 1 a-b-c (See Item 12) 

(See Item 8) Military Science 2 or Air Science 6 5 

Military Science 1 or Air Science 5 5 Physical Education 2 (for men) .... 

Physical Education 1 (for men or 

or Physical Education 2 (for women) 5 
Physical Education 1 (for women) 5 

Total 53 Total 53 

SENIOR DIVISION 

(Note: Students admitted to the junior class of the College of Business 
Administration are presumed to possess satisfactory skill in Business Mathe- 
matics and proficiency in the correct usage of English. As candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration they are expected to main- 
tain reasonable standards in each of these. 

Those students who, by examination or by the quality of their written 
work (examinations, reports, etc.), show a lack of reasonable proficiency 



THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 3_23 

will be required to complete satisfactorily such remedial courses as are as- 
signed by the Dean of the College, prior to graduation. These courses will 
be in addition to those set out as requirements for the degree of B.B.A.) 

Any student classified in the senior division must give priority at regis- 
tration to all uncompleted junior division courses required for the Bachelor 
of Business degree before continuing with senior division courses. 

In the junior year all candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Business 
Administration are required to take a core curriculum which has been ar- 
ranged so as to include introductory courses in most of the fields of con- 
centration. This core curriculum is as follows: 

Economics 312 — Elementary Economic Statistics. 

Economics 326 — Money and Banking. 

Economics 333 — Economic History of the United States. 

Economics 360 — Principles of Marketing. 

Economics 386 — Labor Economics. 

Business Administration 351 — Principles of Organization and Management. 

Business Administration 370 — Business Law — first course. 

It is preferable that the two courses remaining to complete a normal 
schedule should be chosen from subjects not offered in the College. Students 
who plan to major in accounting will desire to begin their advanced account- 
ing courses during the junior year. Students who desire to major in sta- 
tistics will find it necessary to take required mathematics prerequisites as 
their electives as set forth under the description of that concentration group. 

SENIOR YEAR 

The senior year is a year of specialization. The student will select his 
group and in consultation with the chairman of the group will work out his 
program for the year. In each group six courses are required plus Business 
Administration 395, Personal Adjustment to Business. 

These courses complete the minimum of 89 hours in Business Administra- 
tion and Economics necessary for the B.B.A. degree. The additional twenty- 
four hours necessary to complete the 186 hours (exclusive of Military Science 
1-2 or Air Science 5-6 or Physical Education 1-2) required for graduation 
may be chosen either from the offerings of the college or from the general 
electives of the University. This arrangement will facilitate various combi- 
nations, such as business and art, business and music, or business and jour- 
nalism. 

TOTAL REQUIREMENTS 

(Note: The candidate for the Bachelor of Business Administration degree 
is responsible for meeting the requirements as listed.) 

Hours 

A. English 2x-2y, Grammar and American Literature 10 

^2. Mathematics lOlx, College Algebra 5 

At least two units in high school mathematics, including one year 
of algebra, are required as a prerequisite. Students who have insuf- 
ficient high school preparation or who for other reasons are deficient 
in their mathematics are required to take Mathematics 99, a remedial 
course in algebra. 

3. Mathematics 102, Mathematics of Finance 3 

Mathematics lOlx must be satisfactorily completed before schedul- 
ing Mathematics 102. 



324 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

4. Science 20 

Two double courses, one of which must be a laboratory course, to 
be selected from the following: 

Botany 21-22 (Lab.) 
Chemistry 21-22 (Lab.) 
Geology 25-26 (Lab.) 
Geography 121-122 
Human Biology 1-2 
Mathematics 101y, 110 
Physics 20, 27, 28, 329 (Lab.) 
Zoology 25-26 (Lab.) 

5. Social Studies or Foreign Language 10 

Students who elect Social Studies must take two courses from the 
following: 

Geography 101 — World Human Geography 
Philosophy 104 — Introduction to Philosophy 
Psychology 1 — Introduction to Psychology 
Social Science 4 — Contemporary Georgia 
Sociology 5 — Introduction to Sociology 

Students who elect foreign language must take ten hours in one 
language. A student wishing to continue his high school language 
must take language 103 and 104 as college credit will not be given 
for 101 and 102 if high school units have been presented in this lan- 
guage. 

Note: Students planning to continue work toward a Master of 
Science in Business Administration degree should select foreign lan- 
guage instead of social studies as a reading knowledge of foreign lan- 
guage is required for the advanced degree. 

6. Political Science 1, American Government 5 

7. Business Administration 8, Business Correspondence 3 

8. Business Administration 1 a-b-c, Orientation to Business 

Note: Transfer students with junior standing are not required 
to have this course for the B.B.A. degree. 

9. English 22x-22y, Survey of European Literature 10 

10. History HOx-llOy, History of Western Civilization 10 

11. Economics 5x-5y 10 

These two courses are prerequisite to all advanced courses in eco- 
nomics and business administration except by special permission of 
the instructor. 

12. Business Administration 6x-6y, Principles of Accounting 10 

These two courses are prerequisite to all advanced accounting 
courses. 

13. Core Curriculum 35 

14. Major Concentration Group 30 

15. Business Administration 395, Personal Adjustment to Business 1 

16. Electives 24 

It is preferable that the elective courses should be selected from 
subjects not offered in the College of Business Administration. 

17. Total Requirements 186 

(Exclusive of Military Science 1-2 or Air Science 5-6, and Physical 

Education 1-2) 



TH E COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 325 

SUMMARY OF DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

(Exclusive of Military Science 1-2 or Air Science 5-6, and Physical 
Education 1-2) 

Hours 
Required freshman and sophomore courses in the College 

of Arts and Sciences 73 

Principles and Problems of Economics 10 

Elementary Accounting 10 

Business Correspondence 3 

Orientation to Business . 

Core Curriculum 35 

Major Concentration Group 30 

Personal Adjustment to Business 1 

Electives 24 

Total 186 

MAJOR CONCENTRATION GROUPS 

ACCOUNTING 

Mb. Heckmax, Chairman 

Accounting knowledge is fundamental in business whether it be in retail- 
ing or wholesaling, manufacturing or selling. Internal control can be se- 
cured only through intelligent use of business statements and reports. The 
course in accounting is designed to give an understanding of the principles 
and practices in the control of business through records and reports, and 
likewise a knowledge of how to prepare these essential records and reports. 
Governmental regulations and taxation further emphasize the necessity of 
accounting knowledge. 

Recommended courses for majors in private accounting: 

Hours 

Business Administration 311, Introductory Cost Accounting 5 

Business Administration 413, Advanced Cost Accounting 5 

Business Administration 415, Income Tax Accounting 5 

Business Administration 419, Tax Accounting 5 

Business Administration 449, Analysis of Financial Statements 5 

Business Administration 453, Accounting Theory, first course 5 

Business Administration 454, Accounting Theory, second course 5 

Business Administration 479, Functions of the Controller 5 

The program in public accounting is designed to furnish adequate prepara- 
tion for the public accountants examination to those students who plan to 
enter the professional field of public accounting. Public accounting in- 
cludes the fields of auditing, system installations, and tax procedures. In 
order to complete preparation for the State CPA examination a fifth year 
of study devoted primarily to accounting subjects is recommended. The 
Georgia CPA law requires three years of practical experience prior to the 
issuance of a certificate, one year of which is cancelled for those graduates 
who have majored in accounting. 

Recommended courses for public accounting: 

Hours 

Business Administration 311, Introductory Cost Accounting 5 

Business Administration 315, Punch-card Equipment 5 

Business Administration 371, Business Law, second course 5 

Business Administration 415, Income Tax Accounting 5 

Business Administration 417, C.P.A. Review 5 

Business Administration 418, Municipal Accounting 5 

Business Administration 419, Tax Accounting 5 



326 THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

Business Administration 420, Punch-Card Accounting 5 

Business Administration 453, Accounting Theory, First course 5 

Business Administration 454, Accounting Theory, Second course 5 

Business Administration 456, Accounting Problems 5 

Business Administration 457, Consolidated Statements 5 

Business Administration 472, Auditing Principles 5 

Business Administration 473, Auditing Problems 5 

Business Administration 481, Accounting Systems 5 

AERONAUTICAL ADMINISTRATION 

Mr. Nachtrab, Chairman 

In view of the expanding development of air transportation, there is a 
growing demand for college graduates trained in management or adminis- 
tration of aircraft manufacturing or transportation industries and as air- 
port and airline managers. In preparation for a career in this field, this 
major concentration group offers courses covering aerial navigation, meteor- 
ology, aircraft and principles of flight and Civil Air Regulations as well as 
the business administration aspects of this industry. The student will also 
receive the same general training in business and economics as majors in 
other special groups. 

Hours 

Business Administration 320, Commercial Aviation 5 

Business Administration 321, Aerial Navigation 5 

Business Administration 322, Civil Air Regulations and Meteorology 5 

Business Administration 323, Aircraft Powerplants 5 

Business Administration 325, Aircraft and Theory of Flight 5 

Business Administration 327, Airport Management and Operation. 5 

Business Administration 328, Airline Administration and Practice 5 

Economics 475, Economics of Transportation 5 

Economics 485, Personnel Administration 5 

ECONOMICS 
Mr. Smith. Chairman 

An understanding of the economic realities of today's world has come 
to be an essential for the effective management of both private and public 
enterprise. Leaders in both of these important areas must have an appre- 
ciation of the impact of their actions on the nation as a whole, and also an 
appreciation of the significance of general economic developments for the 
decisions that they make. Only through intelligent planning and coordina- 
tion based upon an understanding of fundamental economic relationships can 
our nation adequately fulfill its responsibilities both at home and abroad. 
The program of training in economics is an outgrowth of this basic need. 

Hours 

Economics 406, Economic Theory 5 

Economics 434, Public Finance 5 

Economics 436, Business Cycles 5 

Economics 437, Comparative Economic Systems 5 

Economics 444, Government Control of the Economic System 5 

Economics 450, Monetary Policy 5 

Economics 455, Contemporary Economic Problems 5 

Economics 475, Economics of Transportation -... 5 

Economics 477, Public Utilities 5 

Economics 480, International Trade 5 

Economics 489, The Labor Movement — 5 

Economics 491, Applied Statistics ~— 5 

Economics 494, European Economic History _ 5 



THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 327 

FINANCE 

Mr. Sutton, Chairman 

The finance group covers the essential subjects in money, credit, banking, 
corporate finance, the securities market and the theory of investments. Dur- 
ing the past decade changes of fundamental and world-wide importance have 
occurred in our thinking and practice with reference to money standards, 
currencies, banking laws and policies, and central banking. These vital 
matters are handled in detail in the work of this department. 

Hours 

Economics 334, Personal Finance 5 

Economics 432, Fundamentals of Investment Banking 5 

Economics 434, Public Finance 5 

Economics 436, Business Cycles 5 

Economics 450, Monetary Policy 5 

Economics 491, Applied Statistics 5 

Business Administration 371, Business Law, second course 5 

Business Administration 430, Corporation Finance 5 

Business Administration 431, Investments 5 

Business Administration 449, Analysis of Financial Statements 5 

Business Administration 488, Securities Market 5 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

Mr. Segrest, Chairman 

The major in general business is designed for those students who wish to 
obtain a general rather than a specialized training in business administra- 
tion. It is especially appropriate for those who will eventually become owners 
or managers of small business concerns. In this field emphasis is placed 
upon a comprehensive view of business as a whole rather than upon some 
one of the specialized functions in business administration. This gives the 
student a broader and more extensive approach to business problems than 
that which is afforded by intensive study in a specialized field. 

The method of accomplishing this broader training is that of selecting 
certain basic courses from each of the specialized programs. This gives the 
student an appreciation of the contribution of the specialized groups to the 
going business enterprise and shows how these specialized functions must 
be brought together and organized into a working system in order to operate 
effectively. The courses listed as a part of this major concentration provide 
useful training for the prospective business man regardless of the type of 
business entered. 

Hours 

Economics 334, Personal Finance 5 

Economics 436, Business Cycles 5 

Economics 444, Government Control of the Economic System 5 

Economics 485, Personnel Administration 5 

Economics 490, Labor Legislation 5 

Business Administration 371, Business Law, second course 5 

Business Administration 387, Life Insurance 5 

Business Administration 388, Property and Casualty Ins